Hearthstone II

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bailey020408

New Member
Jan 16, 2008
21
SE Iowa
Hi - can someone talk with me a bit about the pros and cons of the Hearthstone vs. something like a Vermont Castings? The particular stove I'm looking at is older, a Hearthstone II. According to the owner it's been used only about 20 times and now they want to sell it. I believe it was manufactured/tested in 1981, which is a little bit of a conern, but maybe shouldn't be. A picture of the stove is attached. They said it was $3000 new are are asking $1500.
 

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struggle

Minister of Fire
Oct 24, 2006
727
NW Iowa
I have no experience with that stove but it seems priced kind of high to me since the new EPA models work night and day different in both heat output (far better)and wood usage (far less wood like by a third) and much cleaner burning.

There are other that will respond in time about this stove that have used it though.

I would think you would be better off getting a new steel stove in that price range.

The stove does look nice though.
 

STOVEGUY11

Feeling the Heat
Feb 12, 2008
424
SOUTHERN CT
Great stove, buts parts are expensive on the older Hearthstone models. I would check it over and make sure everything looks good. Check for warped cast parts, cracked stones. It will most likely need to new gaskets. Try to talk them down on the price as well, thats alot for a 25 year old stove.
 

edthedawg

Minister of Fire
It does look a bit dated but if you like the style and the price, then fine. Soapstone stoves are just plain different from something like a VC stove. Takes longer to warm up, but once they get there, they stay nice and warm for hours, even if the fire goes out. Not like a cast / steel stove that warms up quickly but also cools noticeably faster. If you're not going to burn 24/7 then maybe you want something from VC.

Check out https://www.hearth.com/ratesingles/rate1405.html

I'm trying to find other details online, but I know one of the biggest concerns w/ the current ones is the fragile ceramic baffle plate above the secondary tubes - look up inside the firebox to see it. Any cracks there and you have to replace it. Don't tap it w/ a poker or split! Similar concerns with the stone surfaces as noted above, but those are much more durable - you just have to slowly get it 'conditioned' up to temp at the start of each season... The front loading door is also much larger on the new ones - this one has a stone side-loading door, right?
 

frwinks

New Member
Oct 27, 2006
52
The Hills of Mulmur
wow, looks to be in excellent condition... if the inside looks anything like the outside (from the pic), then that explains the price tag.
Although it's an older stove ours has no problems heating our 1300sqft+ open concept bungalow. I had to rebuild the internals of ours because of abusive previous owners who overfired it on "few" occasions. Very simple construction, no ceramics, bricks, or complicated baffles. I think they'll have more luck selling it for around $1000 ;-)
 

katman

Member
Jul 7, 2008
168
annapolis md
Looks like it is in great shape. I have one of similar age in my barn. consumes a lot of wood for the heat produced. But like others have said, once the stones warm the heat is very even. Try for no more than 700. It is an old stove, not an antique. the new stoves are more efficient.
 

kwburn

Feeling the Heat
Nov 19, 2005
253
Connecticut
i rebuilt the exact same stove last year and sold it on ebay for around $1200-1300 i think. so in the condition its in that may be what it's 'worth' on the 'market'. you need to see whats doing on the inside though. if those 20 burns were too hot it could be warped and there is also a secondary air tube in there which may or may not be in good condition and a replacement is $75-125. parts are available and yes, are not cheap. construction is very simple like Burning Chunk said.

that said, if i had ANY intention of getting efficient burns by todays standards i would not touch it regardless of how cheap you can get it for.
much better options for that kind of $$, new and used.

it also weighs close to 600 lbs if i remember. there is a reason its on a floor jack. i've moved plenty of stoves and that one was the scariest!
 

wellbuilt home

Minister of Fire
Jul 6, 2008
532
NY
I used a stove like that in the 80s . I think its a great stove . we would heat a 3500sqft house with it . I liked throwing large logs in it . I have a new equinox and the fire box is much smaller. The EQ cost me 3000 bucks but it really burns .
 

lazeedan

Feeling the Heat
Dec 14, 2006
286
SW Michigan
I'd keep looking. Alot of money for old stove no matter what condition it's in.
 

Rich L

Minister of Fire
Jan 25, 2008
846
Eastern,Ma.
g-mail.com
When I had one and while it was in good shape it was the best stove I've had due it's ability to burn coal.I'd get 20 hours of serious heat when I had the coal fired up.As mentioned before check the inside because the coal fires took a toll on the interior of the stove.Also offer them $900.00-$1000.00 if stoves in good shape.
 

kwburn

Feeling the Heat
Nov 19, 2005
253
Connecticut
burning chunk - that's exactly what i did for the air tube on the one i did. i went to a metal dealer and they had tons of odds and ends to choose from and got a really nice piece of stainless for about $15-20. came out better than the real thing.
 

8nrider

New Member
Aug 15, 2008
118
new hampshire
nice stove. we bought a 82' cream(biege) colored about 18 years ago. been using it for primary heat ever since. the stone color looks different than ours and i know there is problems getting matching colors if you need to replace any. parts are available. we paid $2000 for ours in great condition. been in 2 houses both under 2000 sq ft. it only get cold whan the fire goes out .
 

frwinks

New Member
Oct 27, 2006
52
The Hills of Mulmur
kwburn said:
burning chunk - that's exactly what i did for the air tube on the one i did. i went to a metal dealer and they had tons of odds and ends to choose from and got a really nice piece of stainless for about $15-20. came out better than the real thing.
I replaced all metal parts inside the stove that way... rebuilt the entire thing for under $100 :coolsmile: re-cemented the stone and the stove is good for another 20+ years :)
 

jdemaris

New Member
Oct 11, 2008
452
Central New York State
bailey020408 said:
Hi - can someone talk with me a bit about the pros and cons of the Hearthstone vs. something like a Vermont Castings? The particular stove I'm looking at is older, a Hearthstone II. According to the owner it's been used only about 20 times and now they want to sell it. I believe it was manufactured/tested in 1981, which is a little bit of a conern, but maybe shouldn't be. A picture of the stove is attached. They said it was $3000 new are are asking $1500.
I've seen several sell recently, in good shape in the ranges of $400 - $600. I went and looked at the $400 one. It was like new, and now I'm kind of wishing I'd bought it - but it was a little small for my purposes.

I have a later Hearthsone Mansfield - and as far as I know, it's the biggest that company makes. And, it still seems small to me, as compared to many larger stoves I've had in the past (e.g. a Thermo-control 500).

$1500 for a used stove sounds rediculous to me - but . . . this is the worst time of year to buy a wood burner.
 

bailey020408

New Member
Jan 16, 2008
21
SE Iowa
Thanks everyone for your excellent input! I plan to take a look at it tomorrow and see if I can negotiate on the price, and also confirm with my contractor that the weight won't be a problem on my floors.
 
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