Highbeam's NC-30 Blower Design

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Leckbass

Member
Sep 22, 2017
92
NJ
I've been reading Highbeam's design for a blower on his NC-30 from about 2015. I see that the blower is still available on Amazon, I can build the brackets. I want to add a rheostat, a snap disk thermostat, and a bypass. (I've been thinking about this and haven't done anything...)

Has the motor held up to the heat on the stove?

Can I mount that snap disk to the rear of that stove to keep the top looking good?

Anything you would change about your design?
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
92,792
South Puget Sound, WA
A link to the original posting would be helpful for context.
 
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Highbeam

Minister of Fire
Dec 28, 2006
19,679
Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
I've been reading Highbeam's design for a blower on his NC-30 from about 2015. I see that the blower is still available on Amazon, I can build the brackets. I want to add a rheostat, a snap disk thermostat, and a bypass. (I've been thinking about this and haven't done anything...)

Has the motor held up to the heat on the stove?

Can I mount that snap disk to the rear of that stove to keep the top looking good?

Anything you would change about your design?

The motor has held up perfectly. It’s pretty cool down low behind the stove and the running fan self cools by pulling air across the motor. It was designed for fireplace operations.

The snap disk can go anywhere that gives you the temperature swings needed to turn the fan on and off. There could be some trial and error. Putting it on top is pretty ugly but great for function. Commercial stoves always hide it in back.

My improvement would be to install a rheostat somewhere to adjust the blower speed. They sell them for this application and they are pretty cheap. The purpose is just to reduce noise while not needing maximum output.
 

Leckbass

Member
Sep 22, 2017
92
NJ
The motor has held up perfectly. It’s pretty cool down low behind the stove and the running fan self cools by pulling air across the motor. It was designed for fireplace operations.

The snap disk can go anywhere that gives you the temperature swings needed to turn the fan on and off. There could be some trial and error. Putting it on top is pretty ugly but great for function. Commercial stoves always hide it in back.

My improvement would be to install a rheostat somewhere to adjust the blower speed. They sell them for this application and they are pretty cheap. The purpose is just to reduce noise while not needing maximum output.
Definitely going to install the rheostat, maybe I'll hide the snap disk right behind the black pipe