How many people, still burn firewood in their pre epa wood burning stove ?

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Itslay90

Feeling the Heat
Dec 16, 2022
434
Upstate,NY
The reason I asked, is because I still see people using them. The question for you is , why haven’t you switched over to a epa wood burning stove yet.. I will love to hear your feedback on this
 
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The Classics forum is all about pre-EPA stoves.
 
The reason I asked, is because I still see people using them. The question for you is , why haven’t you switched over to a epa wood burning stove yet.. I will love to hear your feedback on this
I still use one in an outbuilding where I need lots of heat really quickly. But no way would I ever go back to heating my house with one
 
Okay, thank you for telling me..
There are enough folks still burning in them to warrant their own forum.
 
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The reason I asked, is because I still see people using them. The question for you is , why haven’t you switched over to a epa wood burning stove yet.. I will love to hear your feedback on this
I’m running a Consolidated Dutchwest FA264CCL as my main stove. Even though it is pre-EPA and has not been in production for decades, its emissions are still within current standards. No need to fix what’s not broken.

My secondary stove is an old Schrader. It is an occasional use stove, used when I want to heat the walk out basement level, or for some extra heat when it’s real cold. I do not see a compelling argument to upgrade a stove in this situation, either from a financial or environmental standpoint.
 
I still burn in a first edition Vermont castings defiant my addition was put up in 1978 and that stove was put in then. At my age in my condition I won't be burning it to much longer and the big reason is I can't afford to replace it and can't afford the gas to run the boiler. I'm making my way to the creek without a paddle
 
I think with todays very high costs of EPA stoves I bet many people are thinking twice before replacing their older stoves. Yes tax incentives help along with local change out programs but still those thousands of dollars can sure buy a lot of firewood to feed the old beast.
 
I’m running a Consolidated Dutchwest FA264CCL as my main stove. Even though it is pre-EPA and has not been in production for decades, its emissions are still within current standards. No need to fix what’s not broken.

My secondary stove is an old Schrader. It is an occasional use stove, used when I want to heat the walk out basement level, or for some extra heat when it’s real cold. I do not see a compelling argument to upgrade a stove in this situation, either from a financial or environmental standpoint.
That stove does not meet current standards. For its day it was absolutely one of the best. But not up to modern standards at all
 
I’m running a Consolidated Dutchwest FA264CCL as my main stove. Even though it is pre-EPA and has not been in production for decades, its emissions are still within current standards. No need to fix what’s not broken.

My secondary stove is an old Schrader. It is an occasional use stove, used when I want to heat the walk out basement level, or for some extra heat when it’s real cold. I do not see a compelling argument to upgrade a stove in this situation, either from a financial or environmental standpoint.
If it was made in 1990 or later it is EPA tested and approved. The FA264CCL meets the US EPA emissions limit for wood heaters sold after 7/1/1990. The 2011 EPA listing for it shows a very respectable 1.6 g/hr rating.
 
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Another one using an older 79 Kodiak Stove for home heating. I intend to upgrade one day... but it is not on my priority list and the Kodiak serves me well
 
Fisher Papa. bholler said it, lots of heat fast. My schedule is goofy especially during winter storm season. If I had a standard 8-5, I would absolutely have a new epa stove.
 
At -50 in our spread out, unconventionally shaped, rancher with 16’, and 12’ and 14’, ceilings in most rooms we appreciate our Fisher Grandma bear. Frankly we are concerned an affordable modern stove would let us down. We see people throw them away every spring after a hard winter.
I suppose fear of cold paralyzes us.
 
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At -50 in our spread out, unconventionally shaped, rancher with 16’, and 12’ and 14’, ceilings in most rooms we appreciate our Fisher Grandma bear. Frankly we are concerned an affordable modern stove would let us down. We see people throw them away every spring after a hard winter.
I suppose fear of cold paralyzes us.
There are hundreds of thousands of homes heated with modern stoves. Like anything else, success depends on doing things right. Many people go for a cheapo model stove picked up at a big box store and try to burn poorly seasoned wood in them. That's a recipe for disappointment. Done right, a modern stove will burn cleaner, use less wood, and it will provide a nice fire view. If anything, it's fear of costs that paralyzes most folks these days.
 
I still burn with a 1980s morso 1125. While it isn't up to today's standards it was ahead of it's time and does a good job heating my house. It has a baffle at least. Old stoves can still do a decent job when burned with dry wood. I certainly plan to upgrade it one day but there are more important projects ahead of it on the to do list.
 
There are hundreds of thousands of homes heated with modern stoves. Like anything else, success depends on doing things right. Many people go for a cheapo model stove picked up at a big box store and try to burn poorly seasoned wood in them. That's a recipe for disappointment. Done right, a modern stove will burn cleaner, use less wood, and it will provide a nice fire view. If anything, it's fear of costs that paralyzes most folks these days.
Yes, I’ve seen references to the high price of new good quality stoves but haven’t checked the prices. Next time I’m out of the bush and off to town I may pop in to the actual wood heat store and sniff around. I think what happens here is what you say where folk buy a stove that isn’t a good brand and, here specifically, buy one too small for their place when it’s pushing -50 and so they over fire them. The stoves end up twisted etc.
If this old place was rectangular instead of some bizarre drunken X shape with the stove way at the end of one arm, I might have looked at a change before now.
 
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Fisher Papa. bholler said it, lots of heat fast. My schedule is goofy especially during winter storm season. If I had a standard 8-5, I would absolutely have a new epa stove.
Why would an 8-5 be important for a new stove? They give you longer burn times
 
8-5 was just a reference that most can understand. Lots of new stoves will keep a house plenty warm for 12+ hours.

Being gone regularly for days and rare occasions weeks at a time in the winter, lots of fast heat is needed to get things back to a comfortable level. The Fisher handles this need very well, knowing full well it’s nowhere near efficient.

Owl
 
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8-5 was just a reference that most can understand. Lots of new stoves will keep a house plenty warm for 12+ hours.

Being gone regularly for days and rare occasions weeks at a time in the winter, lots of fast heat is needed to get things back to a comfortable level. The Fisher handles this need very well, knowing full well it’s nowhere near efficient.

Owl
And it's paid for...
 
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My Vigilant is 42 years old. It's heated my house every Winter for all those years. It still works. Why should I get rid of it. The best $500 investment I made. Yup, that's what it cost me.
You got a good deal. I bought our Resolute when that model first came out and it was $495. That was more money than I had ever paid for anything back then. Including my car. I think the higher price must have been due to shipping costs to the west coast. Loved that stove.
 
You got a good deal. I bought our Resolute when that model first came out and it was $495. That was more money than I had ever paid for anything back then. Including my car. I think the higher price must have been due to shipping costs to the west coast. Loved that stove.
That was 1981. The $500 was a lot of money back then. Especially since I had just bought my house less then a year earlier. Still in the same house, that's why I still have the same stove. Have to do a re-gaskit before the heating season starts in a few months.
 
That was 1981. The $500 was a lot of money back then. Especially since I had just bought my house less then a year earlier. Still in the same house, that's why I still have the same stove. Have to do a re-gaskit before the heating season starts in a few months.
Excellent investment, house and stove!
 
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Still using a Resolute II and a Vigilant II. Put the Resolute in 34 years ago when I moved into this house. Not planning on replacing the stove or the house.
 
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