Husqvarna chainsaw question about durability.

redmanlcs Posted By redmanlcs, Jun 3, 2019 at 10:28 PM

  1. redmanlcs

    redmanlcs
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    I assume, that when talking about Husqvarna chainsaws, there may be a quick way to tell the quality of the saw on looks alone. Price is one indicator as you get what you pay for..... sometimes........

    I have a cheap Husky 240. 185 hard earned dollars for what I think may just be a Poulan with springs and orange plastic. Well it still starts and runs. I broke the chainbrake due to operator error, but in that case it left me wondering how this company could let an operator like me break it in the first place.. Long story.

    My air cleaner is cleaned by first taking out four screws that retain the access cover. 460 rancher is the same way. Or the 455.

    435e however this cover is attached by quick connetors, snap clips, whatever for easier maintenance. This saw is reasonably priced for me at 250 bucks. I use a 14 inch bar the most currently, but a bigger saw is in my future. The saws that have this snap feature tend to be higher priced per bar length. The difference being a few more cc's and the tout of better reliability

    I love the looks of the 440, I could use a bigger saw. It has the snap connectors. Is the 440 worth buying?. Is the quick snaps a sign a better quality? Owner opinions?
     
  2. TreePointer

    TreePointer
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    Ten years ago, the 346XP was Husqvarna's top 50cc offering, and it has the 440's snap fasteners.

    Mine is over 10 years old and they've held up fine.
     
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  3. SpaceBus

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    I have a 460, but just bought a used 346xp on ebay. Consider the weight of the saw above most other qualities while making your choice.
     
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  4. redmanlcs

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    personally I would rather deal with a few extra pounds if the saw would last over two years. Price and durability trumps all else for me.
     
  5. SpaceBus

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    I feel like I read on one of your threads that you are getting older. There's a guy here in Maine that rebuilds saws and will ship them. He's got a Stihl 026 pro for less than $200. I was going to buy a 346xp from him, but it sold. If you go with a quality and durable saw, it will be lighter and more powerful. The homeowner saws are heavier, less powerful, and obviously inexpensive.

    Pick two: cheap, light, durable

    There's a reason I'm buying a used pro saw. It's pretty close in peak HP, but not torque, to my current 436, but it weighs almost 4 lbs less naked. The 346 also costs three times as much as my 460 new. Used it costs less than my 460 new, so much less I snagged a super light 16" bar and two chains. I got tired of slinging that 460 and 20" bar around. I thought about trading it in for a new saw, but figured I might still want it around for stuff. I could only cut two tanks, more if I pushed myself, with the 460 in a day due to the weight. I'm also not a big guy, so that's part of it.
     
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  6. TreePointer

    TreePointer
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    For those who aren't aware, there are two versions of the 346XP. The second version often is referred to as "new edition."

    346XP = 45cc

    346XP (new editinon) = 50cc
     
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  7. redmanlcs

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    yes spacebus, I am getting older.. mid 40's in age with a ton of hard labor under my belt that has took a toll on my back, knees, shoulders, etc. Sometimes I feel like not even getting out of bed. I didn't think about it then, but yes pro saws do tend to be lighter in most cases. I started with a poulan 3314, while it did great when it ran, it locked up tight 2nd year into working it... I spent a few dollars more for a husky 240, homeowner, I think the poulan cut better but the husky has way less vibration which is a plus. It still working strong, but I feel like its not very durable as I have already had to remove the chainbrake due to operator error, now its much more dangerous to operate.

    I haven't had much luck with used equipment. My motto is that if something works good, people don't get rid of it. Cars, electronics, houses.. etc.. almost everything I have purchased used has had something wrong with it that I had to fix. I recall one time I bought a saw for twenty bucks.. I think it was a small McCullough. Guy said that it cuts great and he just didn't use it any more. I started it up and tested it out.. it cut great, ran great, oiler worked.. I bought it.. I went to adjust the chain and bingo...all the bar adjustment goodies had been removed and the place where the screw fit was busted out of the housing. Who would have thought. I'll pass on used anything because I have been burned way too many times.

    I'm just curious if its safe to say that the snap covers on husky saws would be a good indicator of quality. I'm pretty much stuck with huskys as the closest sthil store is two hours away and I hear their quality has went down hill... not sure of that... way overpriced too in my opinion.

    I have ran a few echo's and I like those, but have not ran one for any length of time so I don't know the quality.. Echo store is about 1 hour away and they do have a great warranty and that is a good indicator in my book.

    Think I will get the husky 440, and if it quits after a couple years I will def be done with husky/poulans.
     
  8. SpaceBus

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    A lot of people like the 440, so it should serve you well. By all accounts it's a fine firewood saw. I almost always buy used, I'd rather let someone else pay the depreciation. My truck cost over $50,000 new, I paid under half of that. I also went to automotive school, so I know how to fix it. Saws are a bit different, but parts cost nothing. If you are handy with anything, you can fix a saw. At less than 11 lbs dressed, the 346 was worth the risk for me, it's still on route from Bend OR, so I'll let you know how it turns out.

    A big part for me to buy used is that they don't make the stuff I like anymore. I certainly buy plenty of stuff new, but try and go used when I can. My wife feels the same way as you, and certainly I have been burned, but usually it works out in the end. I almost hope my saw does have issues after a year or so, it's good excuse to learn how to build a hot rod two stroke engine.
     
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  9. tadmaz

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    Whatever you get, just make sure it's from company's the pro line. Stihl, Husky, Echo, etc. You can search the forums for my couple of posts about my 240. It's beyond bad.
     
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  10. SpaceBus

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    I feel like the new class of "landowner" saws work well if a pro saw is too expensive.
     
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  11. Zack R

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    Something like this will be as durable as it gets. Magnesium case, pro saw, very well built.

    upload_2019-6-6_10-45-41.png
     
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  12. redmanlcs

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    True that...i do make exceptions .....espically vehicles....those old homelite xl.12s are legendary....not because they were great saws. Which they were...but they seem to never die...i personally know of one that has been used every year for over 25 years....still on same piston and rings.....so sometimes used is better when your mindset is that they don't make them like they used to....thanks all for the tips and opinions...
     
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  13. SpaceBus

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    Yeah, if they still made a 346xp, I probably wouldn't have gone used.
     
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  14. Sawset

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    We had a husky 50cc homeowner version from '96. And I have stihl ms260pro from '09.
    The differences are kind of stark. Husky, difficult to clean, low power, bulky ergonomics. Stihl pro, all is right with the world. I know this doesn't address the op, but is two cents none the less.
     
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  15. TreePointer

    TreePointer
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    That particular 15 year difference in saws is pretty large in many instances. Many "pro" features of the past are now standard on today's homeowner & midlevel (farm/ranch) saws. Also, your particular 50cc homeowner saw may have been purchased in '96, but it's features/design may be from 1982.

    The bottom line is that it's best to compare particular models.
     
  16. TreePointer

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    For the record, Husqvarna 545 is pretty darn close, you don't have to pay the premium price for the 550XP, and you get an Autotune carb. Stihl 261 C-M at 4.0 hp beats them all. Lots of great options these days.
     
  17. redmanlcs

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    What I find interesting, is that my previous poulan 3314 which locked up on year two....was more powerfull and cut faster than my current husky 240. The 240 cuts slower but has anti vibration which I really enjoy. Money has been tight the last 4 years or so, which made me resort to buying the cheaper saws in hope that they would last at least long enough to get my winter firewood cut. After I cut a season's worth of wood, I consider a $150 saw paid for and don't really care to basically throw it away and buy another the next year. Now my money situation is getting better and can afford a more expensive saw. I have an older stihl trimmer that has been through the wringer. I jury-rigged the carb to work without the filter. Been using it this way for over 3 years now with a washer covering the barrel of the carb to make it idle and rev sufficiently and have good power. I wonder how much longer its going to last sucking in the random blade of grass here and there, Easy to start and has never let me down, if you don't count the time a mud-dauber clogged my muffler with dirt. My husky store is just right up the road so I lean towards those just because they are nearest to me. My nearest stihl dealer has a markup of 20 percent above the msrp and that is outrageous. When i go to a stihl website and search for a saw I like, and they say its 400 dollars msrp... and I go to find it at the retailer and they want close to 500 for it... I pass.. they are the only stihl dealer in 100 mile radius so i guess they have no competition except for the husky dealers which include lowes and tractor supply. I'm about half inclinded to head down to the home depot and buy an echo. Another thing that gets me, especially in my situation.. consider this...........

    Go to lowes buy the 240 husky for 185 bucks. Use it two years and say it locks up. Why would anyone consider spending 400 dollars on another husky even if its considered a pro unit? I don't get the whole homeowner saws vs xp. seems to me manufacturers would make all their saws good quality to ensure repeat customers... If I buy a ford and have a bad experience, I'm def not going to buy that brand again.

    I understand the homeowner vs pro saws in terms of quality. Homeowner saws used occasionally vs pro saws intended to be in service day in and day out. But why would a manufacturer allow such a wide range of quality?... they all should be quality.... hence echo's 5 year consumer warrenty and they don't have such a thing as occasional use and pro saws... so I have heard..
     
  18. SpaceBus

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    It's the weight, not the power I'm looking for.
     
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  19. Sawset

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    Price point.
    The nickel and dime choices that designers need to make - stamped, vs machined, cast, cintered, high vs low grade materials, high tolerance vs low tolerance, extensive testing and stringent pass fail vs higher production lower cost. Each part of the puzzle is scrutinized to make it faster cheaper better, to a point, a price point. Lots of choices now available to designers to siphon off some process here, or coating, or a little material there, to take it to the limit of usability. It used to be - design, then tack on double or triple as a safety factor. No more. Consumers may like the lower price. Or pro's may disregard the price and want higher quality.
    Another thing I think about is how some companies can be absolutely berserk about being competitive. Very punchy and extremely controlling. They seem to be in a better position to produce within a tighter range of quality than others. In a previous life I was involved with producing oem and aftermarket turf care equipment and parts. I thought it was interesting the range of attitudes various manufacturers had with regards to control (and quality). Some wanted feisty control of every minute detail, over the top, invasive, monitoring details, testing, prototypes, on and on. Some sent through prints and said - make. The difference was sometimes reflected in their market share, and which markets those were.
     
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  20. kennyp2339

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    Box store husky's are different then power equipment dealer husky's, the box store basically take the name of husky then re-engineers them to meet a certain price point.
    I own a 359 (10 years old) and a new 465 (<1 yr old) both are solid and very different then the crap you pick up at lowes, home depot, or any other bog box store.
     
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  21. TreePointer

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    I see what you're saying, and good deals can be had on used saws. I was making the point that, for those who can't find a good 346XP-NE, there are comparable options available today.

    Based on manufacturer's specifications:

    346XP = 11.0 lbs, ~3.7 hp

    545, 550XP, and 261C-M are all marginally lighter than 346XP.

    550XP and 261C-M produce a tad more hp than the 346XP.
    At 3.35 hp, 545 produces a bit less than the 346XP.
    261C-M is the clear hp winner in the 50cc class.
     
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  22. redmanlcs

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    In terms of quality, check this one out.

    I was involved in a alternator/starter winding operation. It is amazing how ford/chevy/dodge parts are very much alike all except a certain housing design or fastener location. We shipped electrical windings to all three manufacturers for certain parts such as alternators and starters. I recall one certain winding that was popular which was a starter winding that all three manufactures used. We at one time had a quality problem with a bearing that ran a little out of tolerance.

    Ford refused to take them what so ever.

    Chevy took some of the "bad ones" as long as it wasn't too far out of tolerance.

    Dodge took anything that would work, as long as we gave them a discount.

    I am not a "Ford man" and I don't want to bash Dodge....actually I'm not that brand specific. I'll take anything as long as the price is right and it runs good, but I know for a fact that at at one time, Ford meant quality, at least in the starter/alternator dept. :)

    I guess we can relate this story with chainsaws too!
     
  23. SpaceBus

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    Before Lee Iacoca Chrysler spent more on quality control than any other manufacturer, which was part of them going out of business.
     
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  24. redmanlcs

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    Well personally in my experience, Mopars generally had horrible wiring and ignition systems in the past. I have never heard of a problem with them like the ford pinto or the chevy corvair in reguards to basic build quality and safety issues.. With today's vehicles I think they all are quality. Think back in the 80's when domestic vehicles were lucky to get 100k on the odometer. You never know where your stuff ends up if you building something. Perhaps in the above situation the oversize bearings may have been installed in oversize housings.

    yes lee being in control almost wiped them out.
     
  25. SpaceBus

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    Corvairs and Pintos being dangerous is a myth. Hell, the Corvair monza turbos could probably give most sports cars a good fight in handling and power. Pintos made hugely popular race cars as well.
     
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