I finally took the leap!

Status
Not open for further replies.

BrotherBart

Modestorator
Staff member
I still don't understand why everyone feels the need to line a perfectly good masonry chimney? If you burn dry wood at a reasonably hot temperature you won't have any more creosote problems than you will with a liner.
That is what I thought. But after one year with the two EPA stoves I went ahead and lined the chimneys and difference was day and night. Not only great draft and better burns but a heck of a lot easier to clean.

Linerz in chimleys is gud.
 
  • Like
Reactions: PapaDave

Ram 1500 with an axe...

Minister of Fire
Mar 26, 2013
2,327
New Jersey
It wouldn't hurt to get a second and third quote, a great way to learn more.....and ask questions....
 
  • Like
Reactions: Grisu

Grisu

Minister of Fire
Nov 1, 2010
4,121
Chittenden, VT
I'm also interested in burning Evni Blocks. Your thoughts? I know they're pricier than wood but they're so much cleaner and can be stored in the house.
Quite a few people here have used them successfully. Just be aware that those blocks are really dry and can get your stove very hot in a hurry. Here are some instructions on how to use such blocks from a competing brand: http://www.ecobrick.net/instructions
Essentially, pack them tight. Start with a few and then increase their number with every burn, as long as you feel comfortable that you can control the fire.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
18,329
central pa
I personally have never been impressed with the 2 ply liners we use heavy wall flex liners that are classified as smooth wall also. If I were doing it I would put in an insulated heavy wall liner. But I would use regular light wall before the 2 ply stuff and defiantly insulate it. If it is a rectangle liner it is definatly to big and you should line it.
 

Prishie

New Member
Jan 13, 2014
29
Guilford, Connecticut
Quite a few people here have used them successfully. Just be aware that those blocks are really dry and can get your stove very hot in a hurry. Here are some instructions on how to use such blocks from a competing brand: http://www.ecobrick.net/instructions
Essentially, pack them tight. Start with a few and then increase their number with every burn, as long as you feel comfortable that you can control the fire.

Okay, so now I'm thinking maybe I should just pay for oil and FREEZE! :). AUGH!!!!!
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
18,329
central pa
We have a few customers that burn ecobricks or ones like them. Those people seem happy with them and all but one of the 5 or six customers we have that burn them exclusively have very clean chimneys every year. But yes they do burn hot so I would start slow don't pack the stove full to start.
 

Grisu

Minister of Fire
Nov 1, 2010
4,121
Chittenden, VT
Okay, so now I'm thinking maybe I should just pay for oil and FREEZE! :). AUGH!!!!!
Sorry, was not my intention to scare you. Just start small and then increase the loads you put in, until you know how the air control affects the fire. Stay with the stove during the startup phases until the air is in its final setting. Invest in a good stove thermometer (Condar is usually recommended) that you know the stovetop temps. It just takes some practice, even with wood.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
18,329
central pa
Yeah like grisu said no need to be scared off it isn't complicated it just takes a little bit of a learning period. I am sure you will get it down pretty quickly.
 

prezes13

Minister of Fire
Jan 12, 2014
910
Connecticut
Eco bricks are really great, I have been using them the whole month of March. I had long burns and stove ran nice and hot. I put 8-9 of them at a time and I get 6-10 hours burn times. Only downside that I can think of is their price. $265 a ton at a local dealer. If they were under $200 I think they would be a real threat to a cord wood but at this price I am rather to burn wood.
 

Prishie

New Member
Jan 13, 2014
29
Guilford, Connecticut
Sorry, was not my intention to scare you. Just start small and then increase the loads you put in, until you know how the air control affects the fire. Stay with the stove during the startup phases until the air is in its final setting. Invest in a good stove thermometer (Condar is usually recommended) that you know the stovetop temps. It just takes some practice, even with wood.
No worries! I scare easily when it comes to wood burning stoves! I'm a smart girl, I'll get the gist of it in no time. Especially with all my new 'brothers' on this site! I can already tell I'll be posting questions about Envi and Bio bricks soon!
 
  • Like
Reactions: PapaDave
Status
Not open for further replies.