Installing an EKO

Ilia Posted By Ilia, Feb 26, 2018 at 10:17 PM

  1. Ilia

    Ilia
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    Feb 26, 2018
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    Started looking at wood and pellet boilers recently for my new house and heard good things about the EKO boilers. I see they are on sale at newhorizoncorp website for a good price. Do you know if it's ok to install this to heat a house since they don't seem to be EPA certified. How much cleaner burning and more efficient are the new EPA certified wood boilers? Would I have a problem with code compliance in NH installing an EKO boiler in a shed away from the house? From what I've seen, there is a big price difference between this boiler and other similar size boilers costing around $10000. I plan on installing water storage to make the system more efficient since the house is small and well insulated.
     
  2. Bad LP

    Bad LP
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    10K opens a lot of doors for wood boilers. I wouldn't jump on it just yet.
     
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  3. Ilia

    Ilia
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    Feb 26, 2018
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    The EKO is about $4000 shipped so not a bad deal.
     
  4. 3fordasho

    3fordasho
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    I basically asked the same question about EKO, Vigas, Biomass, Tarm, etc. The only ones that have gone through the new EPA certification process seem to be Froling, Effecta, and Varm. (talking indoor gassers- there are a few others that have EPA compliant models- Garn, woodgun, econoburn) The certification process is expensive, and while most of the euro gassers are clean burning and would pass, I suspect with current energy pricing that the resulting sales would not offset the costs of certification. Now with that said, could you install the EKO? I know I could and nobody would give a rip - nobody would even know about it. Your state, county, township, insurance co. may have different code requirements and would be best to check with them.
     
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  5. Chris Hoskin

    Chris Hoskin
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    Aug 29, 2008
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    It is not legal to sell or install a non-EPA wood burning appliance into a residential application.
     
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  6. 3fordasho

    3fordasho
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    Also in my case If I chose to install a non EPA approved boiler, it would be in a self insured outbuilding. I am also in an rural area where such an install will not bring code inspectors around. If I was to install in my insured living structure, you bet it would be a EPA certified, and would have other required certs, UL/CSA etc.

    The price difference for me between the EKO and EPA certified equivalent (at least size wise) is about $3k. That $3k also buys you some more advanced controls like lambda exhaust monitoring and a lot of ease of use features (auto primary/secondary air adjustment) that makes that extra $3k seem like a bargain over the long haul.
     
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  7. Fred61

    Fred61
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    The OP is saying he plans to heat a "small house". How small?
    I'm heating a small house, just slightly over 1000 sq/ft. It's a re-insulated 1970s ranch that's not just "well insulated" but "properly insulated". If his house heats as well as mine he should seriously consider the EKO. First of all the price is only 75% of what I paid for mine 10 years ago.
    Secondly, When only burning 3 to 4 hours a day to re-heat storage, does he really need all the bells and whistles of the Froling or other "Cadillac" boilers out there?

    Unfortunately, due to age and health that has sapped my stamina this is my last year burning wood. I also want to simplify the heating system for my wife when she's alone. I'm going to miss the daily smile on my face when I put a few sticks in the firebox to heat storage and shut it off 3 hours later. Oil just doesn't do that for me!
     
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  8. NateB

    NateB
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    Mar 5, 2013
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    The EKO does a good job heating, but if you have to load it with a fire in it the room get filled with smoke. It is not a problem for me since it is not in the house, and I only burn once a day, but it is annoying. If you are not into fiddling with things, I would get the fancier controls. Also if you only burn once a day there will be smoke on startup.
     
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  9. Fred61

    Fred61
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    Your experience is totally opposite from mine. I can open my boiler at any time except within a few minutes from start-up and will get no smoke into the room. If you know how to start a new "cold" fire you will not get any smoke.

    EKO firebox 003 (760 x 507) resized.jpg
     
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  10. Fred61

    Fred61
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    I haven't adjusted my settings in eight years if that's what you mean by "fiddling".
     
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  11. Hydronics

    Hydronics
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    I have to agree with Fred on this one - I'd be hard pressed to find a reasonable return on investment for an additional $6K. You may be tired of burning wood before then. Nothing flashy about an EKO but it will do the job well. An outdoor shed is the ideal setup for one.
     
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  12. Fred61

    Fred61
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    Plumbing storage and close boiler piping costs are the same regardless of how much you spent on the boiler. If I had spent $10,000 to $12,000 on a boiler after 10 years I would not have recouped my investment when burning only 2 to 3 cords per year. I would have been ahead by doing nothing and relying on oil. Plus I wouldn't have had to build a woodshed.

    Even installing a lowly EKO, I'm only slightly ahead on payback. I have over $2000.00 in the stainless tank when I add in 200 feet of copper and the cost of the tank plus welding. I'll be lucky to get $4000.00 when I sell boiler and tank.
     
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  13. ihookem

    ihookem
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    If you have a small house and is well insulated you will never get your money back . I dumped 10k into mine already and have burned with it 9 yrs after this year. I have a 2200 sq. ft ranch that really is insulated properly. I dont think I would use $1,000 of natural gas per yr to heat his house . It has 9' walls to boot. I do however love the wood boiler cause I also have 1,000' of 1/2" pex under the floor stapled up and it is a much better form of heat than forced air. I have it hooked up to my furnace but almost never use it through my furnace. My house is so quiet and relaxing that people come over and compliment how quiet my house is, and very comfortable. I will use my boiler till it dies and most likely will not burn anymore. However, my piping should be good and just replacing the boiler would not be so bad. If you have a 1,000 Sq. ft house you are better off with a wood burner in the house for comfort and to cut energy bills. I miss my fireplace though. We have a gas one in our new house and can heat the family room and kitchen .
     
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  14. easternbob

    easternbob
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    I really like my EKO 25. I have it in a separate well insulated shed 60' from the house so no worries about smoke. The short walk from the basement is not bad especially when I get to the shed and it's toasty warm. I designed the shed so my woodshed is attached,easy and dry. One fire a day to heat the storage.
    At $4,000 delivered maybe I should buy a replacement to have sitting in the barn when need it???
     
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  15. stee6043

    stee6043
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    There's a used EKO setup for sale on this site. It would be a heck of a deal for someone in the market...
     
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  16. Fred61

    Fred61
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    Mine will be for sale this Spring.
     
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