Internal piping question

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shredit

Member
Nov 10, 2017
44
Bonner , Idaho
Just build a house and external piping is done. Kuma arrives tomorrow so I need to pipe from the stove to the ceiling box. Should I be using double wall for this run? It will be ~ 7’ of pipe. Also is there anyway to install pipe that will make cleaning easier instead of having to get on the roof of an A frame? Probably a stupid question, but I’m wondering if they make a section of pipe that runs in series with the other sections that is designed to open up and make cleaning easier from inside the house using a flexible chimney brush
 

kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
6,541
07462
I personally like black double wall (dvl) its more robust w/ stainless steel inner pipe, telescoping dvl is the cats meow, makes getting access to the stove collar a breeze.
As far as a clean out for the outside portion of the chimney, you should have a T where the pipe comes from the outside of the house then goes up, there should be a clean out cap where you can take it off and insert a chimney brush to do your cleaning from the ground, make before doing that make sure your cap is rivetted to the chimney and if you can, remove the screen so it doesnt clog up (if you in a fire prone area, leave the screen but be mindful that it will need to be brushed off once a year at a minimum.)
 
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rwhite

Minister of Fire
Nov 8, 2011
1,887
North Central Idaho
Pics would be helpful. They do make telescoping double wall stove pipe. I've have never found that it telescopes easily but it is good enough to lift off the stove and remove a section to clean from the bottom up. I use a sooteater brush. Works great if you keep on top of it. I usually do it midway through winter and again when I clean everything up after the snows gone.
 
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shredit

Member
Nov 10, 2017
44
Bonner , Idaho
It is a vertical run all the way through the roof, there was no T installed on the external pipe for cleaning so I’m trying to learn how I can clean the entire chimney from inside. Here is a picture of the indoor set up. The jackwagons that built the house put the stove chimney in the wrong spot, it will not be centered over the stove so I will need a small offset near the top about 6 inches to 12 inches. These telescopin double wall sections, how long are they and am I going to need to seal the different sections of the chimney together? I’ve been reading contradictory things on that. Here is a picture of what I have
86AC466B-0E44-41B9-8EDD-95A7A8EBA72E.jpeg
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,452
central pa
It is a vertical run all the way through the roof, there was no T installed on the external pipe for cleaning so I’m trying to learn how I can clean the entire chimney from inside. Here is a picture of the indoor set up. The jackwagons that built the house put the stove chimney in the wrong spot, it will not be centered over the stove so I will need a small offset near the top about 6 inches to 12 inches. These telescopin double wall sections, how long are they and am I going to need to seal the different sections of the chimney together? I’ve been reading contradictory things on that. Here is a picture of what I have
View attachment 292651
No sealing needed. Lengths vary allot depending upon manufacturers. I don't know about Kuma's but most stoves now let you clean right up through them
 
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shredit

Member
Nov 10, 2017
44
Bonner , Idaho
I found DVL double wall 45s, can they overlap or do the ends of the 45s need to be joined? I’m not sure exactly how much of an offset I’ll need. What do you recommend?
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
4,353
Long Island NY
Look at a SootEater - you can clean from the inside up, either through the stove, or by (shortening and then) taking out the telescoping piece. The offset won't be an issue for such cleaning. Many folks do it this way.

The only thing to take care of is to keep the room clean; if you go through your stove up that should be fairly easy (but you may need to clean above baffles in the stove etc.). If you take a piece of stove pipe off your stove and then go up, use a plastic bag taped to the pipe with a small hole in it through which you feed the rods.
 

xman23

Minister of Fire
Oct 7, 2008
2,440
Lackawaxen PA
My setup is identical as yours, corner stove. Straight up, 12/12 pitch roof. I used single wall inside. The stove is tucked into the corner, legal distances. The stove and single wall has rear heat shield. I wanted the heat off the pipe, and it's a lot. That said the heat loss in the chimney will reduce the heat to the upper double wall chimney. For me there has been no issue with any creosote build up. Once a year cleaning works fine for me. Normal very small chips and dust.

For cleaning I do a top down with a brush. I have roof walking access to the chimney. I have a 5/5 pitch shed roof of the side of the house. That roof intersects the main roof above the chimney. A high wire act on ladders, remove the top section, allows me to do top down brushing.

Bottom up cleaning works, but if you have a cap with a screen, It will likely plug. I think you have to get up there to clean it.

Just be careful the first few years, your wood won't be seasoned. You will put a lot more gummy creosote in the chimney. Clean after a month or so.
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
4,353
Long Island NY
The single wall indeed robs heat from the flue gases. The question is whether that is smart or not; you need to be able to keep the gases above 212 F (I'd say above 230 F) at the tip, or you'll get creosote condensation. Hence double wall, or insulated etc.

In your case the flue is not too long (so not a lot of cool down along the way), but the Kuuma (I think) will have fairly low exhaust temps. So I think it's safer to go with the double wall. Also double wall is more durable as noted by Kenny.
Moreover, I don't know how tall your total flue stack is, and what Kuuma requires. If you're close to the minimum required, I'd go double wall. Because retaining heat in the gases will increase the draft (and if you're close to the minimum required height, you're close to the minimum draft for the stove to function).

Regarding the 45s "overlapping", I'm not sure what you mean. Yes, you can connect two 45's back to back. (But if you are talking about cutting pieces to make them overlap, I would advise not to do that.)
 
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bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,452
central pa
My setup is identical as yours, corner stove. Straight up, 12/12 pitch roof. I used single wall inside. The stove is tucked into the corner, legal distances. The stove and single wall has rear heat shield. I wanted the heat off the pipe, and it's a lot. That said the heat loss in the chimney will reduce the heat to the upper double wall chimney. For me there has been no issue with any creosote build up. Once a year cleaning works fine for me. Normal very small chips and dust.

For cleaning I do a top down with a brush. I have roof walking access to the chimney. I have a 5/5 pitch shed roof of the side of the house. That roof intersects the main roof above the chimney. A high wire act on ladders, remove the top section, allows me to do top down brushing.

Bottom up cleaning works, but if you have a cap with a screen, It will likely plug. I think you have to get up there to clean it.

Just be careful the first few years, your wood won't be seasoned. You will put a lot more gummy creosote in the chimney. Clean after a month or so.
Rotary cleaners take care of the screen easily.
 

shredit

Member
Nov 10, 2017
44
Bonner , Idaho
I mean instead of connecting the very ends together can I have the metal overlap closer to the angle for a tighter offset, if that makes sense. So instead of just the 1/2” or whatever the ends are, can it be several inches of metal…but after looking closely at the 45s it seems it’s a different design than I was thinking and not possible?
 

shredit

Member
Nov 10, 2017
44
Bonner , Idaho
I just got my stove and the guy seemed very knowledgeable about everything. I was talking to him about my chimney and he was saying that the manufacturer of whatever pipe I get needs to match the manufacturer of the ceiling piece. Is this accurate? Do I need to find out the brand of this peice from the installer? This is a close up of my ceiling piece. 13C33821-551E-462B-81A2-D22426F667D7.jpeg
 
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bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,452
central pa
I mean instead of connecting the very ends together can I have the metal overlap closer to the angle for a tighter offset, if that makes sense. So instead of just the 1/2” or whatever the ends are, can it be several inches of metal…but after looking closely at the 45s it seems it’s a different design than I was thinking and not possible?
They need to go together completely. You will have no adjustment there.
 
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stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
4,353
Long Island NY
And yes, don't combine manufacturers in the system. All one brand. Safest that way. And tested that way.
 
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shredit

Member
Nov 10, 2017
44
Bonner , Idaho
Does my cieling box look like it will accept double wall pipe? I’m not sure of the physical differences. Kuma told me I should use double wall
 
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