Jotul F500 Oslo maintenance

Sawset

Feeling the Heat
Feb 14, 2015
473
Palmyra, WI
Jotul F500, 2009, non cat.
If I were to have a professional sweep come to have a look at my stove, what would be a likely scenario for maintenance and checks required for a 10yr old stove. What checklist, what go through would occur. Currently I have no major issues that come to mind.
Things I've noticed:
I do notice that when dampering down, that the amount has become more closed than original, in order to maintain the same burn rate and temps. I've replaced no door seals to date. The latchs are spring loaded, and still have significant spring travel left. No creosote hot spots have appeared either on the glass or ash door area.
Also, I would question the sealing of the secondary manifolds. Do they need to be pulled apart and resealed with furnace cement (Meeco or Rutland come to mind). I did notice joint seal in that area originally, but have not maintained it, nor was I concered about performance because of it. Have I lost touch, would I see a significant boost in performance by sealing the secondary manifolds? Any checks for joint sealing between cast plates? Lighting inside, look for light outside? Typically do cast stoves need resealing over time, how much time, what criteria to determine that.
I've heard that the top is shipped with hold down brackets, and that in years past those were considered shipping brackets and were left off once the stove was placed. Mine are off. Is that ok. It's handy to clean and access the inside, but is it safe. A backpuff could lift it, or could it not.
Thanks
 
Last edited:

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
78,132
South Puget Sound, WA
Stove gaskets are due for replacement. That includes the ashpan, front and side doors. It's ok to have the shipping bolts removed. The top is gasketed too. That gasket may still be ok.
 
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bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
18,408
central pa
I have never had to tear down one of those jotuls because of leaks their joints seem to hold up really well. But like bg said yes you are due for new gaskets. Make sure the glass is still nice and tight as well.
 

Sawset

Feeling the Heat
Feb 14, 2015
473
Palmyra, WI
So it looks like gaskets for sure. It looks like guys have been having good luck with the Rutland cement on the graphite fiberglass rope. Bg, did that combination hold up on your T6. I think you mentioned that it did at one time, and that the meeco cement did not?

Check that the glass gasket is snug.

Leaving the lid loose is still ok. I'll leave it that way with a little more confidence now.

What it sounds like with the manifolds is that it won't hurt to seal them, but not a major concern. My thought is to get some furnace cement and seal the manifold casting joints anyway. Probably won't hurt. I'll see if I notice a difference.

Otherwise leave the rest of the castings alone.

I do use graphite on the door hinges and primary air slider.

Other than that, I can't think of anything else.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
18,408
central pa
So it looks like gaskets for sure. It looks like guys have been having good luck with the Rutland cement on the graphite fiberglass rope. Bg, did that combination hold up on your T6. I think you mentioned that it did at one time, and that the meeco cement did not?

Check that the glass gasket is snug.

Leaving the lid loose is still ok. I'll leave it that way with a little more confidence now.

What it sounds like with the manifolds is that it won't hurt to seal them, but not a major concern. My thought is to get some furnace cement and seal the manifold casting joints anyway. Probably won't hurt. I'll see if I notice a difference.

Otherwise leave the rest of the castings alone.

I do use graphite on the door hinges and primary air slider.

Other than that, I can't think of anything else.
I use high temp silicone on all door gaskets
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
78,132
South Puget Sound, WA
So it looks like gaskets for sure. It looks like guys have been having good luck with the Rutland cement on the graphite fiberglass rope. Bg, did that combination hold up on your T6. I think you mentioned that it did at one time, and that the meeco cement did not?
I am not fond of Rutland or Meeco gasket adhesive. My best success has been with black or red RTV silicone. This is what most stove companies are using now. I also prefer the factory gaskets, even if they cost a lot more. In the case of our stove there is a big difference between aftermarket and the OEM door gasket.
 

firefighterjake

Minister of Fire
Jul 22, 2008
18,853
Unity/Bangor, Maine
I would at the very least check the gaskets. Most of my gaskets have held up very well over the years. I've replaced a couple of them in the past couple of years . . . others are still OEM and work fine. Just do the dollar bill check on them.

Check for cracks or issues with a bright light inside the firebox in a dark room. That will let you know if you need a rebuild or additional work.

Be sure to clean above the baffle. As mentioned you can take off either the oval plate or the entire top if the latches have been removed. I keep mine in just because I'm that "sort of person", but folks say you can take them off as the heavy plate and top should keep everything in good order . . . in the event of a backpuff the smoke will most likely escape a much easier route out such as the primary air or stove pipe connections.

Also take off the doghouse cover. I like to vacuum out any fine ash that has fallen on to the sliding mechanism and then liberally coat it with graphite powder to allow smooth movement.
 
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Ctwoodtick

Minister of Fire
Jun 5, 2015
1,060
Southeast CT
I am not fond of Rutland or Meeco gasket adhesive. My best success has been with black or red RTV silicone. This is what most stove companies are using now. I also prefer the factory gaskets, even if they cost a lot more. In the case of our stove there is a big difference between aftermarket and the OEM door gasket.
Just curious why you prefer the RTV silicone over the gasket ashesive. I’m looking to possibly redo my door gasket and I’m looking for the best way to do it.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
78,132
South Puget Sound, WA
A few reasons. In the past I have had mixed success with Rutland's adhesive. Some issues were incomplete bonding and if you put too much on a small diameter gasket it can saturate into that gasket and make it too hard. Meecos was just too runny. RTV allows a smoother application of just the right amount and it doesn't run or soak in and stiffen up the gasket. Note that Rutland now sells black RTV for gaskets too. That should be fine.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
18,408
central pa
Just curious why you prefer the RTV silicone over the gasket ashesive. I’m looking to possibly redo my door gasket and I’m looking for the best way to do it.
It just works better lol. I find it sticks better longer. It is easier to clean out. And it is much easier to use.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
78,132
South Puget Sound, WA
Thanks for the info. Is the RTV straightforward to remove if need be?
Seems to be, I see it used on a lot of stoves these days. The only issue I have had was when I used Blue Permatex RTV. It hardened up like a rock and was a pain to remove. Haven't seen that with the red or black RTV.
 

Sawset

Feeling the Heat
Feb 14, 2015
473
Palmyra, WI
I see many different kinds of rtv in both red or black. And also color/brand/use combinations that aren't consistant. What would be the minimum required specs for use on a wood stove. There are popular automotive reds and blacks used on say turbochargers and exaust manifolds. Are these application types suitable? I would think yes, but then am not sure. I see some for applications over 1000deg, some 2000deg. Most are rated at 500-650f.
Also thanks for the info. It's all helpful.
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
78,132
South Puget Sound, WA
Most are rated 5-600ºF which is ok for this application.
 
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kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
4,386
07462
Don't forget about the chimney pipe, some brands break down faster then others so its important to check all connecters and the chimney system itself.
 
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Sawset

Feeling the Heat
Feb 14, 2015
473
Palmyra, WI
Just another bit of information. Over time I found that the side door handle would start to turn hard and seem to bind. No amount of graphite helped. I was able to take a punch and drive out the press fit pin holding the assembly together, remove the works, sand the handle shaft and the hole it went through with emery cloth, coat it with graphite and put it all back together. Really improved the situation. Evidently the steel used for the shaft is able to rust slightly, or at least that's what it seemed like. Buff it clean, and it's back to running smooth again.
 

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