Keeping Glass clean

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Jakee

New Member
Oct 27, 2020
90
New Jersey
I have only burned seasoned cherry so far. I have no issues when the fire is hot or after everything catches good and turning the air down.
I beleve the smoke stains happen when I dampen it down fully at the end of the night. It seems every couple days I have to keep after it.
Anyone else have this problem?
Any special way to keep the glass clean besides windex?
The manual just said to use a non abrasive cleaner.
Any help or advice?

Thanks in advance guys

IMG_6091.jpg
 

marty319

Feeling the Heat
Nov 17, 2014
423
Belair mb
I have only burned seasoned cherry so far. I have no issues when the fire is hot or after everything catches good and turning the air down.
I beleve the smoke stains happen when I dampen it down fully at the end of the night. It seems every couple days I have to keep after it.
Anyone else have this problem?
Any special way to keep the glass clean besides windex?
The manual just said to use a non abrasive cleaner.
Any help or advice?

Thanks in advance guys

View attachment 271258
Dip wet paper tower in some cold ashes and will clean glass very well
 

venator260

Feeling the Heat
Nov 16, 2015
365
Huntingdon County, Pa
On my FP25, I've never used anything but a wet rag. I get a haze on it that needs wiped off every couple of days.

I'm not sure if Windex is advised. On the stove in my basement, something that I did etched the front glass, and now the haze is permanent. Which is why the FP 25 in my living room gets only water.
 

Seasoned Oak

Minister of Fire
Oct 17, 2008
7,217
Eastern Central PA
I use Rutland blue creme. Keep it clean ,if you let it go too long you may not get it clean again. The haze will get etched into the surface.
 
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Caw

Minister of Fire
May 26, 2020
1,091
Massachusetts
Definitely do not use Windex! The ammonia will etch the glass. Stove glass is actually ceramic so you have to clean accordingly. I find I can clean it adequately with a wet rag dipped in ash 99% of the time. If it gets real bad use stove glass cleaner.

If you just accept that its never going to stay perfect and give it a touch up whenever its cool enough you'll be a happy camper. A little grey or even a touch of brown is normal just don't let it get away from you. If its getting fark brown/black/syrupy on the regular something is wrong. Either the wood isn't good enough or you're over cutting the air overnight.
 
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Bad LP

Minister of Fire
Nov 28, 2014
1,845
Northern Maine
some cold ash from the stove and a damp paper towel. The biggest expense is the paper towel.
 

Seasoned Oak

Minister of Fire
Oct 17, 2008
7,217
Eastern Central PA
Definitely do not use Windex! The ammonia will etch the glass. Stove glass is actually ceramic so you have to clean accordingly. I find I can clean it adequately with a wet rag dipped in ash 99% of the time. If it gets real bad use stove glass cleaner.
I didnt think of that, ceramic stove top cleaner. Ill have to try that on my NC-30 . There are parts of it i was never able to get clean,but i can always get my stove top clean.
 

Caw

Minister of Fire
May 26, 2020
1,091
Massachusetts
It works well. Just make sure the glass is cool and you get it all off before refiring. Ive only had to use it once this year so far after an overnight burn with questionable wood. That stack clearly wasn't ready lol. Was too lazy to test with my meter but caused more work in the end!
 

marty319

Feeling the Heat
Nov 17, 2014
423
Belair mb
It works well. Just make sure the glass is cool and you get it all off before refiring. Ive only had to use it once this year so far after an overnight burn with questionable wood. That stack clearly wasn't ready lol. Was too lazy to test with my meter but caused more work in the end!
Don't think you were too lazy.i think you were worn out from playing with the elephant lol
 

Seasoned Oak

Minister of Fire
Oct 17, 2008
7,217
Eastern Central PA
It works well. Just make sure the glass is cool and you get it all off before refiring. Ive only had to use it once this year so far after an overnight burn with questionable wood. That stack clearly wasn't ready lol. Was too lazy to test with my meter but caused more work in the end!
I cant find anything online about using stove top cleaner on a woodstove. I cant see why it would harm the woodstove. My ceramic stove top is 25 yrs old and looks like it was purchased yesterday. I use a razor blade scraper first and the cleaner after. Iv seen some ceramic stoves with a nasty thick hefty crust on them.
 
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SidecarFlip

Minister of Fire
Feb 7, 2010
5,273
S.E. Michigan
Posted it elsewhere... I just take a NATURAL BRISTLE paint brush (I use the cheap one's from HF) and brush the haze and fly ash off the glass a couple times a day. Works like a charm for me. Never use Windex. Don't use a poly bristle paintbrush, it will melt and stick to the glass.
 
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Caw

Minister of Fire
May 26, 2020
1,091
Massachusetts
I actually got the recommendation from the stove dealer and have used it ever since. I find it works better than the regular wood stove glass cleaner like Imperial etc. I figure he uses it on all his active displays and they are pristine no etching.
 
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SidecarFlip

Minister of Fire
Feb 7, 2010
5,273
S.E. Michigan
HF paintbrush is cheaper. Besides, my wife guards her Mr. Clean magic erasers like they are gold....
 
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Seasoned Oak

Minister of Fire
Oct 17, 2008
7,217
Eastern Central PA
I had to spend a few hours scraping the haze off my NC-30 shop stove with a razor blade scraper after neglecting it for too long. I tried everything else first. Got about 80% of it off. My other 3 woodstoves that i use regularly are all good as i keep after them every few loads. Just like a kitchen stove if you let it go too long, your in for a difficult time cleaning it.
 

SidecarFlip

Minister of Fire
Feb 7, 2010
5,273
S.E. Michigan
Sounds like my wife. She lets the oven collect burned stuff until whatever she's baking comes out tasting like whatever she baked in there prior to... The she cleans it, not like it's a big deal, it's self clean electric.
 
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Seasoned Oak

Minister of Fire
Oct 17, 2008
7,217
Eastern Central PA
Sounds like my wife. She lets the oven collect burned stuff until whatever she's baking comes out tasting like whatever she baked in there prior to... The she cleans it, not like it's a big deal, it's self clean electric.
;)But she does have great taste since she chose you for her spouse,right? Thats what i tell my wife anyway.
 

Jakee

New Member
Oct 27, 2020
90
New Jersey
Definitely do not use Windex! The ammonia will etch the glass. Stove glass is actually ceramic so you have to clean accordingly. I find I can clean it adequately with a wet rag dipped in ash 99% of the time. If it gets real bad use stove glass cleaner.

If you just accept that its never going to stay perfect and give it a touch up whenever its cool enough you'll be a happy camper. A little grey or even a touch of brown is normal just don't let it get away from you. If its getting fark brown/black/syrupy on the regular something is wrong. Either the wood isn't good enough or you're over cutting the air overnight.
I cut the air to the minimum when leaving it for the night, seemed like the right thing to do but apparently not.

The stove has only been in service for a week, I've cleaned it twice now using windex. I thought as I was using it, I should check before I do.
I definately wont use it again. I hope I didn't screw it up, it's a brand new piece of glass.
The manual said the following:
"If it is necessary to clean the glass, use a soft cloth with a nonabrasive cleaner." So I figured I was doing the right thing.
Stove ash would seem like an abrasive to me, but if you people say it's OK that's what I'll do.

Think I did any damage having used Windex twice?

Thanks
 

SidecarFlip

Minister of Fire
Feb 7, 2010
5,273
S.E. Michigan
;)But she does have great taste since she chose you for her spouse,right? Thats what i tell my wife anyway.


After 34 years, any 'buttering up' is always construed as a lie anyway....
 

Caw

Minister of Fire
May 26, 2020
1,091
Massachusetts
I cut the air to the minimum when leaving it for the night, seemed like the right thing to do but apparently not.

The stove has only been in service for a week, I've cleaned it twice now using windex. I thought as I was using it, I should check before I do.
I definately wont use it again. I hope I didn't screw it up, it's a brand new piece of glass.
The manual said the following:
"If it is necessary to clean the glass, use a soft cloth with a nonabrasive cleaner." So I figured I was doing the right thing.
Stove ash would seem like an abrasive to me, but if you people say it's OK that's what I'll do.

Think I did any damage having used Windex twice?

Thanks

Windex is non abrasive but they forget to tell you not to use certain chemicals, like ammonia based products. I totally etched my glass after using it only once and learning the hard way. The good news is you'd know right away if its messed up, it happens quick, so it looks fine it should stay that way. If you've recently used Windex just make sure its all off before you fire it up.

I think most of the EPA stove manuals will tell you for the most efficient burn the air should be a touch open. My Osburn 1600 manual says 10% and while I didn't want to believe that at first either, I've come to find it to be true from my own experience with it. Remember every setup is different. Chimney height, flue angles, wind, outdoor temp, chimney location, wood, etc all play a role. But I think on average a touch of air is usually best.

You just gotta experiment. If we want to get mathematical you want to find the limit of air the fire needs as the door approaches blackening overnight given xyz conditions! It'll be a moving but predictable mark as you get used to it.

Grey or even a light brown haze is ok. Black/dark brown is typically a sign of incomplete combustion.
 

Jakee

New Member
Oct 27, 2020
90
New Jersey
Windex is non abrasive but they forget to tell you not to use certain chemicals, like ammonia based products. I totally etched my glass after using it only once and learning the hard way. The good news is you'd know right away if its messed up, it happens quick, so it looks fine it should stay that way. If you've recently used Windex just make sure its all off before you fire it up.

I think most of the EPA stove manuals will tell you for the most efficient burn the air should be a touch open. My Osburn 1600 manual says 10% and while I didn't want to believe that at first either, I've come to find it to be true from my own experience with it. Remember every setup is different. Chimney height, flue angles, wind, outdoor temp, chimney location, wood, etc all play a role. But I think on average a touch of air is usually best.

You just gotta experiment. If we want to get mathematical you want to find the limit of air the fire needs as the door approaches blackening overnight given xyz conditions! It'll be a moving but predictable mark as you get used to it.

Grey or even a light brown haze is ok. Black/dark brown is typically a sign of incomplete combustion.
From now on at the end of the night I'll leave it open a little more. The lowest setting doesn't completely cut the air off but it's worth a faster burn than cleaning the glass so often.
I just used Apple Cider vinegar and it worked great and rinsed it with water afterward.
I'll just keep the Windex around for my diamond stones.

Thanks for your help
 
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Signet123

New Member
Sep 2, 2020
13
Northeast PA
The Rutland stove glass cleaner works well. The best thing seems to be the damp paper towel dipped in ash. This gets the glass sparkling clean and it seems to stay that way longer. When I first tried this, I was amazed. It also works to clean the glass cooktop on our electric stove in the kitchen. I was reading an article about 40 different uses for wood ash.v If your interested, Google it. It's very interesting.
 
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marty319

Feeling the Heat
Nov 17, 2014
423
Belair mb
I used paper towel dipped in ashes ,then windex to clean the glass after.inside and outside of the glass for 10 years on my enviro stove and doing the same on my osburn.never had an issue.just saying.
 
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