Modern wood stove designed for radiant heat- does it exist?

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CodSandwich

New Member
Mar 29, 2022
1
Kisap County, WA
Hi,

I'm looking to get a freestanding woodstove to replace my current propane fireplace insert. We're looking for a good heat output in a large, high ceilinged, poorly insulated home. All the new woodstoves I have seen seem to rely primarily on convection heat, which I don't think would be the best for our space, considering how much airspace there is to heat- correct me if I'm wrong, but it's my impression that radiant heat will heat objects, not air, which would be much better for my particular house setup.
I know radiant heat stoves come with higher required clearances, which is why they aren't as popular- that wouldn't be a problem for us though, we have a fully tiled floor and lots of open space. Are there any newer stoves that are uninsulated/primarily designed for radiant heating? Any stove recommendations? We are also definitely looking for non-catalytic stoves.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
93,756
South Puget Sound, WA
The Drolet Austral III is unshielded and a big heat maker. The Jotul F500v3 and Hearthstone Manchester are also radiant stoves.
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
4,525
Long Island NY
I take issue though with radiant stoves heating things vs convection stoves heating air.

I have a convective stove, but the stuff within 10 ft does get warm. Moreover, a radiative stove does not make a couch 80 F and keeps the air at 50 F.

You'll still need a ceiling fan to push down the heat.

This is not to say the suggestions above are not good.

Regarding the floor, check to make sure only ember protection is required (except for when the tile is directly on concrete - in which case you will loose a lot of heat to the floor).
 
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snobuilder

Feeling the Heat
Dec 16, 2021
432
WI
The Drolet Austral III is unshielded and a big heat maker. The Jotul F500v3 and Hearthstone Manchester are also radiant stoves.
Ok so i'm a bit confused.....
The Drolet Austrial looks to be very much like my Peasant Hearth in design and even price and comes up as a direct comparison on the Lowe's website.
So I guess I am wondering what the OP means by convective vs. radiant wood stove because I'm pretty sure my P.H. stove heats everything....air and objects in the room as well, in fact I actually think it is the heated air that is then heating the objects....LOL
What would be the differences between "convective" and "radiant" ? Is it an insulated firebox?.... and even if it is, the metal has to get hot and then either radiate or if a blower attached, blow the heated air around but it heats the air in the room either way.
Is this a third category of stoves aside from cat/non-cat?
 
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EatenByLimestone

Minister of Fire
Shielding is the main difference. Radiant stoves are a steel box. A convective stove is a steel box with a cover over it to encourage air to move over the hot surface and convect the heat away.

Radiant stoves also heat through convection and convective stoves heat through radiant heat. It’s just a difference in percentage of 1 function over another.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
93,756
South Puget Sound, WA
Ok so i'm a bit confused.....
The Drolet Austrial looks to be very much like my Peasant Hearth in design and even price and comes up as a direct comparison on the Lowe's website.
So I guess I am wondering what the OP means by convective vs. radiant wood stove because I'm pretty sure my P.H. stove heats everything....air and objects in the room as well, in fact I actually think it is the heated air that is then heating the objects....LOL
What would be the differences between "convective" and "radiant" ? Is it an insulated firebox?.... and even if it is, the metal has to get hot and then either radiate or if a blower attached, blow the heated air around but it heats the air in the room either way.
Is this a third category of stoves aside from cat/non-cat?
There are many stoves that have the same basic design as the Pleasant Hearth. The devil is in the details of construction.

A radiant stove can be good for larger spaces where the radiant heat can be felt at a distance. And in some cases, it's just what people are used to. We had an old fellow here that went from a Nashua to Summit and complained constantly about the lack of heat. After many posts and threads it was determined that after he learned how to run the stove, the room temp was in the high 70s, it was getting good long burns, buthe still was not happy. What he missed was the radiant heat. He sold the Summit and got an Austral and was a happy camper after that.
 

moresnow

Minister of Fire
Jan 13, 2015
1,978
Iowa
There are many stoves that have the same basic design as the Pleasant Hearth. The devil is in the details of construction.

A radiant stove can be good for larger spaces where the radiant heat can be felt at a distance. And in some cases, it's just what people are used to. We had an old fellow here that went from a Nashua to Summit and complained constantly about the lack of heat. After many posts and threads it was determined that after he learned how to run the stove, the room temp was in the high 70s, it was getting good long burns, buthe still was not happy. What he missed was the radiant heat. He sold the Summit and got an Austral and was a happy camper after that.
I believe he is on to another chapter. WS Ideal Steel.
 

jalmondale

Member
Dec 16, 2021
118
NY
Except for the non-catalytic requirement, I'd say Woodstock Soapstone as well - it's radiant heat, but at a lower more consistent temperature (because of the thermal flywheel effect of the soapstone - it's the closest I could get to a masonry heater in my house =P). Depending on why you want a non-cat, I can at least comment on the Fireview having a very easy-to-clean cat (just lift the top of the stove, loosen two bolts, and out it comes, no messing around in the firebox required), and the replacement ones seem to be on the cheaper side. If you want bigger flames, Woodstock makes some hybrids that might work.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
93,756
South Puget Sound, WA
Soapstone, masonry heaters, and cast iron clad stoved are what I would call softly radiant. It's a buffered heat that is a less intense than when there is nothing between a 1200º firebox and the room but 3/16" steel or 1/4" cast iron.
 
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Bad LP

Minister of Fire
Nov 28, 2014
2,001
Northern Maine
Soapstone, masonry heaters, and cast iron clad stoved are what I would call softly radiant. It's a buffered heat that is a less intense than when there is nothing between a 1200º firebox and the room but 3/16" steel or 1/4" cast iron.
More mass is a more even heat for sure but if you want it hot then a single layer stove is the winner.
 

jalmondale

Member
Dec 16, 2021
118
NY
Soapstone, masonry heaters, and cast iron clad stoved are what I would call softly radiant. It's a buffered heat that is a less intense than when there is nothing between a 1200º firebox and the room but 3/16" steel or 1/4" cast iron.
Definitely agree that a 350 degree stovetop is going to be less intense than an 800 degree stovetop, but it sounds like the OP's goal was just to get a stove that heated more via radiant than convection (rather than specifically trying to have a really hot single point source). In that case, having a 'softly radiant' source might be ideal (that was something I specifically wanted for a stove) - the IR can heat all the edges of the room without over baking the area near the stove.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,682
central pa
Definitely agree that a 350 degree stovetop is going to be less intense than an 800 degree stovetop, but it sounds like the OP's goal was just to get a stove that heated more via radiant than convection (rather than specifically trying to have a really hot single point source). In that case, having a 'softly radiant' source might be ideal (that was something I specifically wanted for a stove) - the IR can heat all the edges of the room without over baking the area near the stove.
Unless you are in that area near the stove getting hit with the radiant heat. I really think to much is made out of the radiant/convective thing. Even a pure radiant stove is going to also heat convectively to some point. And no matter what a woodstove is a single point heat source.
 
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stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
4,525
Long Island NY
^^that.
And I can still burn myself radiatively by sitting in front of the stove, if I so wish, with a stove that is designed as "convective".
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
93,756
South Puget Sound, WA
Unless you are in that area near the stove getting hit with the radiant heat. I really think to much is made out of the radiant/convective thing. Even a pure radiant stove is going to also heat convectively to some point. And no matter what a woodstove is a single point heat source.
Yes, all stoves heat by both means to some extent, but there can be a bias in one direction or another. We didn't get specifics on why the OP wants a radiant stove but if this is like the case with oldspark's stove, then the OP may want something that is intensely radiant from the sides as well as the front and top. The initial question and title of the thread imply this.
 
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bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,682
central pa
Yes, all stoves heat by both means to some extent, but there can be a bias in one direction or another. We didn't get specifics on why the OP wants a radiant stove but if this is like the case with oldspark's stove, then the OP may want something that is intensely radiant from the sides as well as the front and top. The initial question and title of the thread imply this.
Absolutely there is usually a bias one way or another. And in some situations that can make a big difference. But most of the time I don't think it matters much