Morsø 3142b or 3112b

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LordHill

New Member
Aug 25, 2021
14
WA state
Been poking around the forums a bit, tons of great knowledge to be found but I still have a few unanswered questions. I’m looking at buying a new Morsø wood stove for heating my aprox. 1200 sq ft wa state home. I’ve narrowed down my choice to either the 3142b or the 3112b. I know the 3142 is convection and the 3112 is radiant. Slightly different technology and different size firebox but essentially the two stoves seem very similar. Can someone expand upon the differences or provide a more detailed description of these two models and possibly recommend which model they would choose and why? I’m also curious if I did choose one of the other, do both stoves have different side panel options? For instance if I wanted the 3142 with blank sides is it available to the US market or are squirrel sides the only option for 3142 model? I’ll be fitting into existing tile lined brick chimney using a new ss flex liner too. Plan is to add some non combustible surfaces to the walls and floor in order to lesson the required clearances and bring tighter to the corner, but holding off until I know exactly what stove I will have installed. Will provide picture. Was using box to represent where the stove will sit but it will be tighter to the corner. Thank you in advance!

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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
89,791
South Puget Sound, WA
These are small stoves and more of a room heater than the whole house. The manual does not permit clearance reductions so be sure to check with the inspecting authority before reducing clearances. If they permit a clearance reduction it will have to be with an NFPA 211 wall shielding. A non-combustible surface alone does not permit clearance reduction. Also, be sure that you have dry, fully seasoned firewood on hand that is 12" or smaller. This can sometimes be a challenge to obtain.

As an alternative perhaps consider the Jotul F45 which will take the more common 16" firewood and will have a longer burn time if the intent is to heat the entire home 24/7 with wood. The F45 does permit closer clearances with NFPA 211 wall protection.
 
Nov 21, 2020
154
NeK Vermont
These are small stoves and more of a room heater than the whole house. The manual does not permit clearance reductions so be sure to check with the inspecting authority before reducing clearances. If they permit a clearance reduction it will have to be with an NFPA 211 wall shielding. A non-combustible surface alone does not permit clearance reduction. Also, be sure that you have dry, fully seasoned firewood on hand that is 12" or smaller. This can sometimes be a challenge to obtain.

As an alternative perhaps consider the Jotul F45 which will take the more common 16" firewood and will have a longer burn time if the intent is to heat the entire home 24/7 with wood. The F45 does permit closer clearances with NFPA 211 wall protection.
Yea but the F45 is god aweful ulgy. The F500 is better. Good condition f-400 even better. Sucks Jotul stopped making the best 2 stoves, the 3 and 400.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
89,791
South Puget Sound, WA
Yea but the F45 is god aweful ulgy. The F500 is better. Good condition f-400 even better. Sucks Jotul stopped making the best 2 stoves, the 3 and 400.
Yes the F400 was a good looker, but the F45 though different and not with the gothic look, it is far from ugly and nicely made.
 

LordHill

New Member
Aug 25, 2021
14
WA state
I’ve considered the F45 but I’m limited with space in that corner and even with clearances reduced stove protrudes. I like the looks of the f500 Oslo but it’s prob too much stove for my home and I’m not crazy about the new fyre tech. When I say I’ll add noncombustible behind I’m saying clearance affected surfaces will be metal stud-concrete board- tile. Properly done it seems like the manual allows u to reduce those clearances. Says even with non combustible surfaces clearance must be no less then 4inches. The stove will be used as a supplemental source of heat mostly thru the colder days of winter.I’ve heated the entire house with cadet space heaters for the past few years. I know the 3112 fits a 12” split but I thought the 3142 would fit a “15.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
89,791
South Puget Sound, WA
Even with an NFPA 211, ventilated wall shield the minimum clearance allowed is 12" unless the stove mfg has tested the stove and included the tested lower clearances in the documentation. The F45 has a reduced clearance table.

What other stoves have been considered? The traditional looking. PE Alderlea T4 can be installed with 5" corner clearances.
 

LordHill

New Member
Aug 25, 2021
14
WA state
I’ve mostly been looking at Morso, and Jøtul because those brands are well known and available thru dealer near me. I also like the more minimalist Scandinavian/European designs. Looked at and considered lopi too because they are manufactured locally. I’m open to all suggestions. Just looking for a quality brand that meets my functional needs and looks good. My house is a 1952 bungalow style and I’m looking to buy brand new as well as take advantage of the new tax savings.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
89,791
South Puget Sound, WA
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LordHill

New Member
Aug 25, 2021
14
WA state
It looks like the Alderlea T4 qualifies for the credit too, are any other stoves coming to mind that fit the criteria and will also qualify for the tax credit? Thank you again for the reply’s, all the input is very much appreciated!
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
89,791
South Puget Sound, WA
The T4 is EPA 2020 certified but with a 72% efficiency, it does not qualify for the tax credit. Only stoves with a tested efficiency of 75% or greater qualify.
 

LordHill

New Member
Aug 25, 2021
14
WA state
Shoot 75 and up, really narrows things down, I just found that information and now understand better how to sort the data, thank you begreen!
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
89,791
South Puget Sound, WA
The 7110 is a nice small stove and sized for your space. The Hearthstone G40 is a hybrid with a similar clean, contemporary look.
 
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LordHill

New Member
Aug 25, 2021
14
WA state
I’m taking a real hard look at the Jotul f 602 v2 because it fits the space well with the back to short wall, and it includes a 211 reduced clearance table. When I was quoted recently for similar stoves, the local store installers concluded the largest SS liner they could fit down the existing clay liner would be 5.5”. Will that size liner work with this stove. My other question relates to clearances for wood structure. My Chimney runs through my home and so there are areas where the framing is basically against the masonry. I plan to replace the clearance affected areas near the stove with metal studs, backer, tile ect but above the stove on the rest of the chimney does there need to be any clearance for my wood framing and the brick if I’m using a SS liner within a clay liner within the brick chimney. I believe the brick is 3.5” or thicker. Any response is greatly appreciated.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
25,667
central pa
I’m taking a real hard look at the Jotul f 602 v2 because it fits the space well with the back to short wall, and it includes a 211 reduced clearance table. When I was quoted recently for similar stoves, the local store installers concluded the largest SS liner they could fit down the existing clay liner would be 5.5”. Will that size liner work with this stove. My other question relates to clearances for wood structure. My Chimney runs through my home and so there are areas where the framing is basically against the masonry. I plan to replace the clearance affected areas near the stove with metal studs, backer, tile ect but above the stove on the rest of the chimney does there need to be any clearance for my wood framing and the brick if I’m using a SS liner within a clay liner within the brick chimney. I believe the brick is 3.5” or thicker. Any response is greatly appreciated.
Yes for an internal chimney you need 2" clearance to combustibles. If you don't have that the clay tiles will need to be removed to allow room for an insulated liner.
 

LordHill

New Member
Aug 25, 2021
14
WA state
I plan to run a SS liner no matter what but the inside measurement of my clay liner is about 7” so I’m told 5.5“ SS (insulated I believe) liner is biggest installer can fit. Just wondering if 5.5 will be suitable for the new 602. So using the insulated liner within the existing stack I will still need 2 in clearance all the way up? Thank you
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
89,791
South Puget Sound, WA
Sounds like it may be a standard 7x11" ID tile. If so, an insulated 6" liner can be ovalized, or a preinsulated liner can be installed. Duraliner makes a preinsulated 6" oval liner system that will fit and will have all the elements necessary to do the job.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
25,667
central pa
I plan to run a SS liner no matter what but the inside measurement of my clay liner is about 7” so I’m told 5.5“ SS (insulated I believe) liner is biggest installer can fit. Just wondering if 5.5 will be suitable for the new 602. So using the insulated liner within the existing stack I will still need 2 in clearance all the way up? Thank you
Is the liner square or rectangle?

A bare stainless liner is not an insulated liner. And if your clay liners are 7" square inside an insulated liner even 5.5 isn't going to fit. So you either need that 2" clearance and you could use an in insulated liner or the clay liners will need to be removed so you have room for insulation.

If the clay is rectangular you just need an insulated oval liner.
 

LordHill

New Member
Aug 25, 2021
14
WA state
The clay liner is 7.5”x7.5” attached photos. What’s my best option to run the 602 considering everything? On a side note, that chimney is aprox 28” from the peak of the roof, does anyone know the min height for that? I’ve scheduled for someone to rework the exterior including new crown prior to a new stove install so Ill need to verify that chimney out of roof req. for Wa state.

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bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
25,667
central pa
The clay liner is 7.5”x7.5” attached photos. What’s my best option to run the 602 considering everything? On a side note, that chimney is aprox 28” from the peak of the roof, does anyone know the min height for that? I’ve scheduled for someone to rework the exterior including new crown prior to a new stove install so Ill need to verify that chimney out of roof req. for Wa state.

View attachment 281548 View attachment 281549 View attachment 281550
It needs to be 2' above anything within 10' so you are good there. And you will need to remove those liners in order to bring the chimney up to code. It also looks like it needs some flashing work
 

LordHill

New Member
Aug 25, 2021
14
WA state
So it looks like it’s only around 6 -7/8” at most was being a bit optimistic haha, but looks like taking out the clay will clear up a lot of space. After having the clay removed will it accommodate a 6” insulated pipe? I’m just assuming the pipe internally is 6” and then how much space will the min insulatation take up? Also flashing repoint tuck and crown are all scheduled but will hold off on crown to take the liner out if need be. And with the insulated liner inside the >3.5” masonry chimney after removing clay, my existing framing is against the brick in many places up and through roof, and so what I’m trying to understand, thats okay using the insulated liner?
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
25,667
central pa
So it looks like it’s only around 6 -7/8” at most was being a bit optimistic haha, but looks like taking out the clay will clear up a lot of space. After having the clay removed will it accommodate a 6” insulated pipe? I’m just assuming the pipe internally is 6” and then how much space will the min insulatation take up? Also flashing repoint tuck and crown are all scheduled but will hold off on crown to take the liner out if need be. And with the insulated liner inside the >3.5” masonry chimney after removing clay, my existing framing is against the brick in many places up and through roof, and so what I’m trying to understand, thats okay using the insulated liner?
Yes a 6" insulated liner will easily fit without the clay. A wrapped liner will be 7.25 to 7.5.

And yes with a proper insulated liner you have a zero clearance to combustibles rating on the outside of the masonry structure