Moving a Meridian stove

Tango papa Posted By Tango papa, Feb 7, 2019 at 5:28 PM

  1. Tango papa

    Tango papa
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    May 2, 2016
    28
    9
    Loc:
    Peterborough, ON Canada
    My beloved Meridian stove needs repair to the refractory lining again and I have decided to replace it. Does anyone have any experience or ideas on moving a 550# stove? It has to step down about 2” off the hearth and then one step down into the porch and another step down onto outside grade. I would hate to demolish it, but right now that is what the new stove installer is suggesting I do.
     
  2. begreen

    begreen
    Mooderator 2.
    NULL
    
    Staff Member

    Nov 18, 2005
    76,461
    12,199
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    If you can get wheels under it then moving is much easier. Tip it and put a piece of plywood underneath it that is slightly larger than its diameter. Then take a stout hand truck (appliance dolly) and slip its lip under the plywood. Put a moving blanket over the stove to protect it. Then move the stove so that it touches the frame of the hand truck and ratchet strap the stove to the hand truck so they become one unit. Now the stove will be fairly easy to move with a helper or two. Myself and 2 helpers moved our 600# stove this way. It went smoothly.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  3. Tango papa

    Tango papa
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    May 2, 2016
    28
    9
    Loc:
    Peterborough, ON Canada
    That is a great idea. The stove even has a "flat side" where the door is and I can strap that to the dolly at least until I get to the outermost porch door. That is 31" and the stove is 32. At that point I have to turn it 90 degrees and restrap it nut should have the room to do that. If I can get it out im one piece I can even try to sell it. It could still do service in a cottage or camp.
     
  4. begreen

    begreen
    Mooderator 2.
    NULL
    
    Staff Member

    Nov 18, 2005
    76,461
    12,199
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    If nothing else, the hardware still has value if you decide to sell the stove for parts.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  5. Ashful

    Ashful
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Mar 7, 2012
    13,956
    6,705
    Loc:
    Philadelphia
    Are there any soft floors, like pine or cork? If so, you’ll want to lay down some plywood to protect the floor from the dolly. DAMHIKT.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  6. Tango papa

    Tango papa
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    May 2, 2016
    28
    9
    Loc:
    Peterborough, ON Canada
    The floor is oak parquet but I’m thinking’s of getting some wafer board 4x8s to lay down. Cheap insurance. I will sell it on kijiji if I can.
     
    Ashful likes this.
  7. begreen

    begreen
    Mooderator 2.
    NULL
    
    Staff Member

    Nov 18, 2005
    76,461
    12,199
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Our floors are white oak. The pneumatic tires on our hand truck didn't scratch the floor. But it you want to be cautious lay down some cardboard.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  8. Ashful

    Ashful
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Mar 7, 2012
    13,956
    6,705
    Loc:
    Philadelphia
    We have one room of new white pine, a previous owner laid over the original 1770’s old-growth pine. I steam-rolled tire tracks into it moving one stove, the stove was just too heavy for the soft new pine wood fiber to support. No scratches, but obvious indentation. Might be a good excuse for me to tear up this new floor and check our what’s beneath, someday.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  9. begreen

    begreen
    Mooderator 2.
    NULL
    
    Staff Member

    Nov 18, 2005
    76,461
    12,199
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    New growth white pine doesn't seem to have the durability of old growth. On oak there was nary a trace in spite of moving a 600# stove.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  10. MTY

    MTY
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 9, 2019
    89
    60
    Loc:
    Idaho
    The operative word in bgreen's first post is STOUT.

    If you do lay down a sacrificial surface, you can strap a piece of plywood to the bottom of the stove, place pipe as rollers under the stove and push it around easily. i have moved 3K pound machines this way. It is a one man operation.

    Depending on the approach angles, an engine hoist could get it off the pedestal and down the step.
     
  11. begreen

    begreen
    Mooderator 2.
    NULL
    
    Staff Member

    Nov 18, 2005
    76,461
    12,199
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    I move stoves using a Milwaukee hand truck and ratchet straps. Rated 800# I think. It didn't grunt for a moment when moving the heavy T6.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  12. MTY

    MTY
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 9, 2019
    89
    60
    Loc:
    Idaho
    A few years ago, I drove over to Missoula and bought a really nice Fisher. I off loaded it with the tractor. I put it on the hand truck and started down the walk. I barely got moving when the tops of the tires started pointing inward. It was not quite up to the task. Most likely made in China as I only paid about $20 for it new.
     
  13. Ashful

    Ashful
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Mar 7, 2012
    13,956
    6,705
    Loc:
    Philadelphia
    The new pine averages less than 5 growth rings per inch, the old shows over 20 rings per inch. The old is also entirely quarter sawn, the new is a mix of quarter, rift, and even a few planks approaching a face cut. Yeah... that might have something to do with it! :)
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  14. Ashful

    Ashful
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Mar 7, 2012
    13,956
    6,705
    Loc:
    Philadelphia
    ... oh and to move my three big Jotul Firelights, I'd just jack them up with planks and prybars, slide a 4-wheeled dolley under them, and wheel them outside. Once out on the porch, I'd ramp down to the lawn, then pick them up with the front end loader and set into the bed of the pickup truck. Quick and simple, only ever needed help to keep them from swinging as I'd lift with the loader, otherwise it was a one-man operation.

    Those stoves had the advantage of a stout cast ash pan drawer that hung between the four legs, perfect for supporting the stove while the legs dangled on either side of the dolly. On this tall bulbous thing, I'd be looking at the hand truck option, with some carpet between the hand truck and stove.
     
    Stop hovering to collapse... Click to collapse... Hover to expand... Click to expand...
  15. Tango papa

    Tango papa
    Member 2.
    NULL
    

    May 2, 2016
    28
    9
    Loc:
    Peterborough, ON Canada
    I ended up renting a multi-mover from Home Depot. Worked beautifully. Basically a heavy duty fridge cart that has two additional wheels that have adjustable locating pins. They “catch” the load as you tilt back and now you are on four large, rubber wheels. I was able to move it across the snow packed covered driveway with ease. You still need four people to control the stove as you slip a piece of ply under it and when you unload it.
     
    Ashful likes this.

Share This Page