Moving questions

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I am in the middle of a flooring remodel and I'm waiting until cold weather is over before I floor underneath the stove and hearth pad. A couple questions

First, what is the best and safest way to move the stove off the hearth pad? I'm planning on scooting a wood board up to the pad and trying to push/lift the stove off of it, but it's got the 4 legs I'm afraid will get caught, it's super heavy etc... Any tips would be appreciated.

Second, the floor is a half inch thick, I didn't do the install, but will that little of a change give me a headache later on when I reinstall it? The pipe runs out the roof, I just don't know how much play is in the piping.

Lastly, with a change in flooring and floor color, I'm wanting to look at another color of hearth pad. Ours is tile, and I like the pattern well enough and don't feel like dropping another 500 on a pad, is there some spray paint or anything like that where I can repaint it, where it will not look totally stupid? Also, I figure when I put the stove back on the pad the legs will drag on it, so it will probably scratch the new paint if I did that. Again, any options or suggestions would be appreciated.

I can add pictures if needed. I've got a lopi deerfield stove, from memory I want to say it weighs in the 300-400 lb range
 

hockeypuck

Feeling the Heat
Sep 6, 2009
374
south central NH
I am in the middle of a flooring remodel and I'm waiting until cold weather is over before I floor underneath the stove and hearth pad. A couple questions

First, what is the best and safest way to move the stove off the hearth pad? I'm planning on scooting a wood board up to the pad and trying to push/lift the stove off of it, but it's got the 4 legs I'm afraid will get caught, it's super heavy etc... Any tips would be appreciated.

Second, the floor is a half inch thick, I didn't do the install, but will that little of a change give me a headache later on when I reinstall it? The pipe runs out the roof, I just don't know how much play is in the piping.

Lastly, with a change in flooring and floor color, I'm wanting to look at another color of hearth pad. Ours is tile, and I like the pattern well enough and don't feel like dropping another 500 on a pad, is there some spray paint or anything like that where I can repaint it, where it will not look totally stupid? Also, I figure when I put the stove back on the pad the legs will drag on it, so it will probably scratch the new paint if I did that. Again, any options or suggestions would be appreciated.

I can add pictures if needed. I've got a lopi deerfield stove, from memory I want to say it weighs in the 300-400 lb range
I would get a couple of pieces of 2x4 and try to secure two stove legs to each piece. Unsure what your stove legs look like. Some come with holes so you can screw them down.
 
Here's a picture of the legs
 

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hockeypuck

Feeling the Heat
Sep 6, 2009
374
south central NH
If you can secure a couple of 2x4's to those legs.. get a couple of 1 1/4" pvc pipe pieces to roll it around on, should be pretty easy with 2 poeple. I have moved 600lb generators rolling around on PVC pipe.
 

Wooden Head

Burning Hunk
Sep 14, 2009
235
West Michigan
I am in the middle of a flooring remodel and I'm waiting until cold weather is over before I floor underneath the stove and hearth pad. A couple questions

First, what is the best and safest way to move the stove off the hearth pad? I'm planning on scooting a wood board up to the pad and trying to push/lift the stove off of it, but it's got the 4 legs I'm afraid will get caught, it's super heavy etc... Any tips would be appreciated.

Second, the floor is a half inch thick, I didn't do the install, but will that little of a change give me a headache later on when I reinstall it? The pipe runs out the roof, I just don't know how much play is in the piping.

Lastly, with a change in flooring and floor color, I'm wanting to look at another color of hearth pad. Ours is tile, and I like the pattern well enough and don't feel like dropping another 500 on a pad, is there some spray paint or anything like that where I can repaint it, where it will not look totally stupid? Also, I figure when I put the stove back on the pad the legs will drag on it, so it will probably scratch the new paint if I did that. Again, any options or suggestions would be appreciated.

I can add pictures if needed. I've got a lopi deerfield stove, from memory I want to say it weighs in the 300-400 lb range
I moved my Quad Castille when I was doing flooring. I used a 4 wheel furniture mover that I purchased from Harbor Freight. I was about $15. It has a hardwood frame that I attached a piece of plywood (The size of the base of the stove). I tilted the stove up and slid the unit under one side of the stove. Then lifted the other side of the stove and slid the stove onto the plywood base. This is much easier if you have a person to hold the furniture mover while you slide it on. This worked very well. I was able to wheel the stove to any place I need it.
 
I moved my Quad Castille when I was doing flooring. I used a 4 wheel furniture mover that I purchased from Harbor Freight. I was about $15. It has a hardwood frame that I attached a piece of plywood (The size of the base of the stove). I tilted the stove up and slid the unit under one side of the stove. Then lifted the other side of the stove and slid the stove onto the plywood base. This is much easier if you have a person to hold the furniture mover while you slide it on. This worked very well. I was able to wheel the stove to any place I need it.

I didn't think about Harbour freight. Thanks