My unique non functional setup - need help rebuilding

ColdNH

Minister of Fire
Oct 14, 2009
598
Southern, NH
Hey guys, We moved back in 2017 to a unique house with a unique wood stove setup. Since then we have determined its completely unusable and 100% poorly installed. The biggest issues are clearances where it passes through the floor, a warped section of class A stove pipe, improper adapter used at the floor pass through and no vaulted ceiling mount and again improper clearances at the vaulted ceiling.

I have one quote from a professional chimney company to rebuild the entire system to the tune of 4,700 bucks. all new stove pipe and done proper install. everything but a new stove. I priced out the parts on my end for less than half of that estimate and I figured the labor would not be too hard to accomplish on my own.

My concerns/questions are, is it possible to have a floor mounted support and a vaulted ceiling support? Wouldn't the stove pipe lengths need to be exactly perfect lengths in order for this to work? My thought is that is why he initially skipped the vaulted ceiling support when he did the install originally.

Also the stove pipe above the floor (below the vaulted ceiling IS class A (painted matte black) is it possible to buy this class A pipe already painted matte black? (my roof is black metal) I realize even the class A pipe above the floor is supposed to be encapsulated by a wall to prevent things from leaning against it. We do not have kids and that loft is rarely used so I may forgo encapsulating that however, Does anyone else have a setup like this?

I really want to get this thing ready to go by winter time, im sick of burning oil!

shoredr6.jpg
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
82,426
South Puget Sound, WA
Hey ColdNH, welcome back. Black chimney pipe is available from some manufacturers like Ventis (Champion/Olympia). Excel is sold painted in black, but you could do this yourself to save some change. There may be more than one way to fix the installation. One is to use a ceiling support box as is used currently but with proper clearances. Then pass through the sloped ceiling with proper clearances and use a sloped ceiling trim ring to cover the 2" gap. A roof support bracket could be added under the flashing if desired, but it is not a necessity.

The chimney pipe in the loft needs to be protected. Maybe the kids aren't up there now, but that may change as they grow. Accidents can happen when least expected. Maybe surround with well-anchored, 10" round black stove pipe?
 

ColdNH

Minister of Fire
Oct 14, 2009
598
Southern, NH
Hey ColdNH, welcome back. Black chimney pipe is available from some manufacturers like Ventis (Champion/Olympia). Excel is sold painted in black, but you could do this yourself to save some change. There may be more than one way to fix the installation. One is to use a ceiling support box as is used currently but with proper clearances. Then pass through the sloped ceiling with proper clearances and use a sloped ceiling trim ring to cover the 2" gap. A roof support bracket could be added under the flashing if desired, but it is not a necessity.

The chimney pipe in the loft needs to be protected. Maybe the kids aren't up there now, but that may change as they grow. Accidents can happen when least expected. Maybe surround with well-anchored, 10" round black stove pipe?

Thanks begreen. I don't have kids and its definitely not in the plans! but thats a good idea about 10" black stove pipe. would keep the same appearance and accomplish some protection, cause yes your right accidents do happen.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
82,426
South Puget Sound, WA
If surrounded with 10" black stove pipe, then you could use cheaper galvanized chimney pipe for the interior passage and switch to black above the roof.
 

livetosail

Member
Nov 12, 2017
50
Indiana
We had something somewhat similar. By that, I mean our stove passed through a ceiling, into and through another living space (my office upstairs) and exited through a vaulted roof.

49003cb35c7667dc1919904d5614fbf7.jpg
Stove on first floor

We used regular stove pipe up to the ceiling, then passed through using a ceiling support box. Above that (in my office) we converted to class A, and ran that up 16ft through the roof, keeping clearances to all walls and joists.

2917c3f6b66cf97018468d648070e658.jpg
Building the chase. Notice the 16ft vaulted ceiling.

We enclosed the class A by building a chase, using standard framing techniques and lining the insides of the chase with class X fire-resistant drywall (all according to code here in Indiana).

f2413115c7ccc7b0caddb1ce36c81167.jpg

The finished product. The chase is the right corner of the picture.

Our setup was more in a corner than yours, so the result of the chase (once dry walled, painted, and trimmed on the outside), was around a 2ft inside corner in one corner of the room, which most people never even notice.

Looking at your pictures, and having done all of the work described above by myself, I would personally do the same approach: build a chase to enclose the class A. Then I would probably close off the lost space between the chase and wall upstairs, so that the upstairs wall and stair railing originates at the chase. A little drywall and paint (and cutting the railing short) would go a long way to eliminating the awkwardness and restoring that space to true beauty.

It is already beautiful, by the way. :)

Good luck!
 
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