Need guidance. New to this. Insert?/standalone? Hybrid if they make them?

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BAS

New Member
Oct 9, 2021
5
Northeast US
New to all of this. With all the talk of energy shortage this winter I was looking into a wood burning stove to help heat - and if possible - to cook on. I have an existing fireplace (approx dimen: 35”w, 27”h, 20”d - but the back of the fireplace tapers narrower).

The fireplace itself is built up about a foot off the floor level (see pic) but I was hoping to get something that would partially slide in the current opening and partially stick out. Preferably with a top I can set a pot on if need be. Do they make anything like that? I also need it to throw off heat - it won’t heat the whole house because of the convoluted layout - not sure if the airflow would get much downstairs. The room itself is big and opens to other rooms. (About 2400 sq ft). Am I completely out of touch or is there something out there that I haven’t been able to find so far? Any suggestions would be appreciated.

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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
89,794
South Puget Sound, WA
They used to make the Regency i2100 Hearth Heater which fits that description, but it is no longer sold. The best bet is to pick an insert that projects out onto the hearth 4-6". Note that the stove will need fully seasoned wood to perform properly. Finding truly dry wood for sale and a reputable wood seller can be very difficult at this late date.
 
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BAS

New Member
Oct 9, 2021
5
Northeast US
They used to make the Regency i2100 Hearth Heater which fits that description, but it is no longer sold. The best bet is to pick an insert that projects out onto the hearth 4-6". Note that the stove will need fully seasoned wood to perform properly. Finding truly dry wood for sale and a reputable wood seller can be very difficult at this late date.
Is there a difference between say a $700 wood burning stove at say a Tractor Supply or Home Depot and a $2500 model at a specialty store? I know this doesn’t fit my situation mentioned above but I’m trying to get a feel for cost. A Lexus gets me to my destination more comfortably but a Subaru gets me there just as well.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
89,794
South Puget Sound, WA
Yes, in some cases there are big differences. However, there are some good value inserts too. Century and Drolet are by SBI and are decent inserts for under $2000. The Escape 1800i is a decent medium-sized heater. However, if one wants a larger N/S loading firebox then it will take moving up to an Osburn, Regency, Pacific Energy, Lopi etc.
 
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EbS-P

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2019
1,258
SE North Carolina
This will make a stove hard. If you could find a used Jotul F400 you might be able to squeeze it in. It would be tight. That would be the smallest size at 1.7 cu ft that I would entertain but know it’s really too small. We have 1000 sq ft and it heats that ok down to the high 20s here.

I shopped and shopped for a 29” h fireplace 3 years ago and no most of those options are not available. Go the insert route. I just did the cheapest quality DIY insert I could find (Drolet 1800i trio from Costco)and it came out to $2000 including tax. Probably would have been $1000 to install if I hired my awesome stove shop.

Not that you can’t find a free standing stove but you will compromise, size or durability come to mind.

Look for inserts.

Evan
 
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BAS

New Member
Oct 9, 2021
5
Northeast US
I called Drolet/Century and apparently they don’t offer an insert that sticks out enough to cook on. So far all I can find is Regency and my quotes are around $5500 installed. It would take 7 years of really bad winters just to break even so that’s not even a consideration. Again, I may be trying to achieve perfection but I’m looking to help with heat AND have an emergency source for cooking - preferably with a top that sticks out enough for a pot. Is there a product, reasonably priced, that anyone knows of or am I asking far too much?
 

kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
5,975
07462
I called Drolet/Century and apparently they don’t offer an insert that sticks out enough to cook on. So far all I can find is Regency and my quotes are around $5500 installed. It would take 7 years of really bad winters just to break even so that’s not even a consideration. Again, I may be trying to achieve perfection but I’m looking to help with heat AND have an emergency source for cooking - preferably with a top that sticks out enough for a pot. Is there a product, reasonably priced, that anyone knows of or am I asking far too much?
Facebook market place, search for wood burning inserts, find one that isnt beat up, buy a new liner for the chimney, install it yourself
 
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EbS-P

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2019
1,258
SE North Carolina
my quotes are around $5500 installed. It would take 7 years of really bad winters just to break even
This is a Drolet 1800i Trio from Costco . Cheapest insert I could find. As a DIY install with insulated liner it cam to 2000$ If you remove the surround you get an extra 2” of. Cooking space is About 8” deep.

I don’t know if any new stoves that meet your requirements. Maybe a new jotul F45 v2 rear vent but it will be in the 5-6000$ range.

Evan

58EA77FC-411F-4C8E-900C-FA7B995C0AB6.jpeg image.jpg
 
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BAS

New Member
Oct 9, 2021
5
Northeast US
This is a Drolet 1800i Trio from Costco . Cheapest insert I could find. As a DIY install with insulated liner it cam to 2000$ If you remove the surround you get an extra 2” of. Cooking space is About 8” deep.

I don’t know if any new stoves that meet your requirements. Maybe a new jotul F45 v2 rear vent but it will be in the 5-6000$ range.

Evan

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Evan - I could use some help. Last night I realized that these inserts don’t fit tapered (especially significantly tapered) fireplaces. I see yours is tapered. Can I ask what yours tapers to? It appears yours goes in pretty deep. Mine is a total of about 20 - 21 inches deep and at the back goes down to about 23 1/2 inches wide (the mouth of the opening is 35 inches). So at about 26 inches deep the insert is going to stick out a bit. A rough measurement shows that by about 12 inches in the opening is only 29” wide (the 1800 is 28” wide). I’m not sure what to do.
 

kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
5,975
07462
One of the things you can do is take a piece of cardboard and cut the stove's width / length out and slid it in to see where it sits within your fireplace. Know that you'll have about 7" sticking out beyond the threshold of the f/p (where the surround goes on) and go from there.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
89,794
South Puget Sound, WA
If it's close, in some cases a bit of the rear firebrick can be ground out to fit the insert's upper corners.
 

EbS-P

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2019
1,258
SE North Carolina
So the 1800i is 28” wide. I have 29 or 30” BUT I have it all the way back. It could be moved forward by 2-3”

The 1800i is not a flush insert it’s made to stick out some and they give some space to move it front to back to make the surround fit.

I knew my opening was wide and deep enough to make it work so I didn’t bother to make measured drawings. I think you are going to have to do you can tell where the outlet of the appliance will be and how far out it will be from the front of the fireplace and if you can get your liner connected. They make offset connectors but those should be avoided if possible.

Drolet makes a smaller 1500i.
 

kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
5,975
07462
I've experimented with cooking on the stove and in the stove, I've made grilled cheese using a cast iron pan on the stove top, pork tenderloin in the dutch oven on the stove top and cooked steaks literally inside the stove by resting the steaks on the hot coals. It boils down to a novelty, you get much better results / control when you use a grill or propane burner, the stove will work but there's to many variables for it to be efficient.
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
89,794
South Puget Sound, WA
Depends on the stove and setup. For an insert, one's options are limited by the narrow exposed top and/or convection lid. That said, we use the stove often for cooking as long as it is splatter free (no frying). The heat is there so we use it. The swing away trivets offer almost infinite temperature control. We raise bread dough on it and slow cook often. I love Dutch oven cooking on the stove. Just put in the ingredients and set on the stove for a fast or slow cook. Come back in an hour or three depending on what you are cooking and what temperature it cooks at, and voila! yummy meal. I've cooked turkey breast for Thanksgiving and ham for Christmas this way and they melt in your mouth.
 

Highbeam

Minister of Fire
Dec 28, 2006
19,177
Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
I suppose we all could list the things we cook in our ovens too. Every home should have a purpose built appliance that cooks food at least as well as the woodstove which is fine for a novelty or third layer backup.

You know, you can cook burritos and baked potatoes on the engine of your car. Anybody do that too?
 

moresnow

Minister of Fire
Jan 13, 2015
1,796
Iowa
I suppose we all could list the things we cook in our ovens too. Every home should have a purpose built appliance that cooks food at least as well as the woodstove which is fine for a novelty or third layer backup.

You know, you can cook burritos and baked potatoes on the engine of your car. Anybody do that too?
Not at current gas prices;) Ha. Just had to interject a bit of humor!
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
89,794
South Puget Sound, WA
I suppose we all could list the things we cook in our ovens too. Every home should have a purpose built appliance that cooks food at least as well as the woodstove which is fine for a novelty or third layer backup.

You know, you can cook burritos and baked potatoes on the engine of your car. Anybody do that too?
Wood heat vs paying for electrons is why some burn, right? Same for cooking on the stove. It's already running. And on the holidays my wife really appreciates having the oven free for all the other good things she is cooking up.

Not at current gas prices;) Ha. Just had to interject a bit of humor!
Hard to do on an EV and even with an ICE not nearly as convenient or fun.
 
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BAS

New Member
Oct 9, 2021
5
Northeast US
Just a quick thank you to all of you (getting the thank you in before embarrassing myself). You guys were great with your information and I have someone coming in next week to inspect the chimney and make sure there are no problems with the install.

Now for the embarrassing part: I kept saying here the depth of the Drolet 1800i was 26 3/8 inches which made it impossible to install. Well, it is. Except that includes the blower in the front. The installer had me pull up the schematics for the insert and actual depth is about 15 1/2”. Huge difference.

Long story short; it will fit. However I owe it all to all of you in providing great advice as well as the suggestion of the Drolet. Can’t thank you all enough!!
 
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stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
1,611
Long Island NY
Depends on the stove and setup. For an insert, one's options are limited by the narrow exposed top and/or convection lid. That said, we use the stove often for cooking as long as it is splatter free (no frying). The heat is there so we use it. The swing away trivets offer almost infinite temperature control. We raise bread dough on it and slow cook often. I love Dutch oven cooking on the stove. Just put in the ingredients and set on the stove for a fast or slow cook. Come back in an hour or three depending on what you are cooking and what temperature it cooks at, and voila! yummy meal. I've cooked turkey breast for Thanksgiving and ham for Christmas this way and they melt in your mouth.

Making yoghurt in a glass bowl with a lid on the hearth the appropriate distance from the stove. Needs long near 100 F temps.