Need help, Losing heat and think chimney is installed wrong

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searle7

Member
Feb 29, 2016
10
Idaho
Hello all,

I am building a new construction house and had a kozy heat Albany ZC fireplace (similar to their Z42). Local fireplace shop installed it. I posted earlier about venting the chaise until I realized the attic insulation shield has a big "vent" in the top of it already which dumps the heat into the attic. See attached pictures. The pipe on the left is the pipe from a basement gas fireplace. The pipe on the right is the outside combustion air intake. Someone in a previous thread mentioned of putting an "airtrap" as the original installers didn't do it. I verified in the manual and it did recommend it so I rerouted the pipe to include a small "trap".

I have most of the house sheet rocked and have been heating the house with the fireplace along with some electric heaters. However I don't know how I'm going to seal the chaise to prevent the house air from escaping from the attic shield 24/7 even when I am not burning. From doing some research, it seems that I'm suppose to have either a ceiling support box or a firestop? Can the firestop be caulked to prevent air leakage? Its aggravating I spent all the time air sealing all the electrical penetrations to only have this gaping hole in the ceiling.
Can anyone give me recommendations or if I am indeed missing something?

Thanks,

Austin

20220115_113030.jpg 20220228_072636.jpg 20220115_113107 edited.jpg 20220207_155057.jpg
 

kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
6,541
07462
Installation looks legit to me
 

savageactor7

Minister of Fire
Jan 25, 2008
3,782
CNY
Just wait and see...

...many newer houses are so tightly sealed wood burners question if stoves have sufficient draw.
 

searle7

Member
Feb 29, 2016
10
Idaho
Just wait and see...

...many newer houses are so tightly sealed wood burners question if stoves have sufficient draw.
I have an outside air intake so it doesn't matter how sealed the house is. Also I'm supposed to sheet rock, brick it, and if is indeed wrong rip all that off and redo it?
 
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webby3650

Master of Fire
Sep 2, 2008
11,121
Indiana
It should have a fire stop on the bottom, with the insulation shield on the top side of the plywood draftstop. Then the small gap between the pipe and fire stop gets caulked to air seal it.
 
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searle7

Member
Feb 29, 2016
10
Idaho
It should have a fire stop on the bottom, with the insulation shield on the top side of the plywood draftstop. Then the small gap between the pipe and fire stop gets caulked to air seal it.
Bingo. You are right. I called Metal fab Inc, the vent system used and they said the same thing. Sad thing is even the inspector didn't notice anything wrong. This is after my fix.
20220308_214917.jpg
 

Woodcutter Tom

Burning Hunk
Apr 28, 2019
224
Northern Illinois
I question the air intake. Won't that act as a chimney? I thought intakes should not be run veritcal...especially for that length.
The pipe on the right is the outside combustion air intake. Someone in a previous thread mentioned of putting an "airtrap" as the original installers didn't do it. I verified in the manual and it did recommend it so I rerouted the pipe to include a small "trap".
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
4,353
Long Island NY
I question the air intake. Won't that act as a chimney? I thought intakes should not be run veritcal...especially for that length.
I noted that in the previous thread too. According to the OP the manual says it's ok for this appliance. I'm surprised about that, but can't argue with the manual.
 

searle7

Member
Feb 29, 2016
10
Idaho
I noted that in the previous thread too. According to the OP the manual says it's ok for this appliance. I'm surprised about that, but can't argue with the manual.
See picture. It states that if the intake is above the intake collar that an air trap is required. My guess is to prevent the chimney draft effect.

Screenshot_20220309-193105_Adobe Acrobat.jpg
 
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Woodcutter Tom

Burning Hunk
Apr 28, 2019
224
Northern Illinois
See picture. It states that if the intake is above the intake collar that an air trap is required. My guess is to prevent the chimney draft effect.

View attachment 293328
Maybe I am overly cautious, but I would be 100% sure before you enclose the wall. I don't read this the same as you do. I see about adding the trap but I also read 'run to the nearest outside wall'. I don't see anything about going up through the ceiling. I could be wrong.....I have been before. Just my 2 cents.
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
4,353
Long Island NY
The 4th pic in that page of the manual shows an air intake above the stove, and the required air trap.
I'm as surprised by you. But can't argue with the manual.

OP: the stove is UL listed, right? I think that means it'll have to have been tested including this configuration.
 

Woodcutter Tom

Burning Hunk
Apr 28, 2019
224
Northern Illinois
I probably am wrong. Sorry about that.
Here is the complete wording of item #4 from the manual. Can't read from the OP post about 'terminate intake at least 3 feet below termination level of chimney.'

4. If ducting beside the chimney chase, terminate intake air at least
3’ (914mm) below the termination level of chimney. The air pipe
may also be ducted below floor level of the fireplace, providing it
is ducted to the outside
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
4,353
Long Island NY
Weird indeed. Only case I am aware of that this is (seems to be consensus) allowed.