Overheating stove in Hearth

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Oct 15, 2020
145
New Hampshire
Just had a company tell me they don't "suggest" installing their freestander in the fireplace because it could overheat due to being somewhat enclosed.


Anyone ever heard of this? I feel like they're probably just covering themselves liability-wise and that temps can be regulated with a thermometer or something to keep me aware of stove temps.
 

Highbeam

Minister of Fire
Dec 28, 2006
19,150
Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
Just had a company tell me they don't "suggest" installing their freestander in the fireplace because it could overheat due to being somewhat enclosed.


Anyone ever heard of this? I feel like they're probably just covering themselves liability-wise and that temps can be regulated with a thermometer or something to keep me aware of stove temps.

Many modern stoves are much less controllable than you would like. Reason being they use high firebox temperatures to burn clean and satisfy the EPA.

You should have at least one thermometer on your system to monitor temperatures regardless of installation methods.

The actual manufacturer told you not to put their stove into the fireplace?
 
Oct 15, 2020
145
New Hampshire
Many modern stoves are much less controllable than you would like. Reason being they use high firebox temperatures to burn clean and satisfy the EPA.

You should have at least one thermometer on your system to monitor temperatures regardless of installation methods.

The actual manufacturer told you not to put their stove into the fireplace?
No they didn't say not to. I was mentioning my plan and he specifically said they "suggested" not installing them in the fireplace and using an insert.
 

EbS-P

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2019
1,206
SE North Carolina
Just had a company tell me they don't "suggest" installing their freestander in the fireplace because it could overheat due to being somewhat enclosed.


Anyone ever heard of this? I feel like they're probably just covering themselves liability-wise and that temps can be regulated with a thermometer or something to keep me aware of stove temps.
I think the temps can get higher. I have a cheap pellets stove convection blower sitting behind mine in the fireplace. I use to the keep stove top temps in check. And an Auber AT200 temp alarm.
Edit….

I consider my install safe as did the pro who installed manual has section about fireplace installs. The install location has increased the likelihood of a temperature excursion. It’s still small. All stoves can be over fired.
 
Last edited:
Oct 15, 2020
145
New Hampshire
I think the temps can get higher. I have a cheap pellets stove convection blower sitting behind mine in the fireplace. I use to the keep stove top temps in check. And an Auber AT200 temp alarm.
Edit….

I consider my install safe as did the pro who installed manual has section about fireplace installs. The install location has increased the likelihood of a temperature excursion. It’s still small. All stoves can be over fired.
My plan is to order one of those heat powered fans to put on the top. I totally understand the idea but I feel like it is something I can regulate with a fan and a thermo on the top of the stove.

Does that seem unreasonable? We aren't using this as a main source of heat some im thinking regular sized fires will be fine, I just need to practice safe burning.

A couple larger and smaller stoves I've seen have "installed in fireplace" instructions (mainly jotul).
 

EbS-P

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2019
1,206
SE North Carolina
Does that seem unreasonable? We aren't using this as a main source of heat some im thinking regular sized fires will be fine, I just need to practice safe burning.
I think those are fine fire every day but they really don’t move much air. I had an near over fire /overfire this year. One large really dry, super sappy pine split with some other wood on a hot bed of coals. 120 cfm was able to keep the temps at 800 on the top 1/3 way to the the edge and 900 in the top center. Never got my liner, at the 4” above the collar, above 750. Baffle and air deflected were glowing. I wasn’t wanting a big fire it wasn’t a big load and I turned the air down at what I thought was the right time. It was kind of gusty outside maybe 30 degrees. now way I could reach the air intake with the stove hot. Don’t want to create an explosion by sealing it all the way off either.

I’m glad I had the big blower. I use it less than 1/2 the time.
 
Oct 15, 2020
145
New Hampshire
I think those are fine fire every day but they really don’t move much air. I had an near over fire /overfire this year. One large really dry, super sappy pine split with some other wood on a hot bed of coals. 120 cfm was able to keep the temps at 800 on the top 1/3 way to the the edge and 900 in the top center. Never got my liner, at the 4” above the collar, above 750. Baffle and air deflected were glowing. I wasn’t wanting a big fire it wasn’t a big load and I turned the air down at what I thought was the right time. It was kind of gusty outside maybe 30 degrees. now way I could reach the air intake with the stove hot. Don’t want to create an explosion by sealing it all the way off either.

I’m glad I had the big blower. I use it less than 1/2 the time.
Drolet does offer a blower and thermodisc setup but I was hoping to avoid any electronics for power outages...as well as the blower noise. Obviously don't want to burn my house down either.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
89,577
South Puget Sound, WA
Overheating is more likely to have occurred due to operator error, not with the stove in a fireplace.

The Drolet can operate without the blower during an outage. And the blower can be run on low speed to keep the noise low. When it is zero outside the blower will be welcome.
 
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Oct 15, 2020
145
New Hampshire
Overheating is more likely to have occurred due to operator error, not with the stove in a fireplace.

The Drolet can operate without the blower during an outage. And the blower can be run on low speed to keep the noise low. When it is zero outside the blower will be welcome.
All sounds reasonable. For $150, blower seems like good insurance.
 

EbS-P

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2019
1,206
SE North Carolina
couple larger and smaller stoves I've seen have "installed in fireplace" instructions (mainly jotul).
I will add since you have an exterior chimney you will loose considerable heat through the brick which if you went insert you could insulate and then cover up with the surround. Not planning on heating full time it’s probably not a big consideration. With my radiant stove 90 degrees on the wall behind the chimney is normal after running for 12 hours.
 
Oct 15, 2020
145
New Hampshire
I will add since you have an exterior chimney you will loose considerable heat through the brick which if you went insert you could insulate and then cover up with the surround. Not planning on heating full time it’s probably not a big consideration. With my radiant stove 90 degrees on the wall behind the chimney is normal after running for 12 hours.
Haha, this certainly won’t be an efficient endeavor. That’s okay though.
I was told to run a block off plate to help with heat loss which I will definitely do. The opening up the flue of the chimney is absolutely massive.
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
89,577
South Puget Sound, WA
All sounds reasonable. For $150, blower seems like good insurance.
Why put a freestander in there instead of an insert with a full convection jacket and blower included?
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
25,487
central pa
I don't think there is a big danger of overheating due to simply being inside the firebox. But it is going to be the least efficent spot to install a stove
 
Oct 15, 2020
145
New Hampshire
I haven’t found any inserts that only require ember protection. I could take on a project and try to redo the hearth extension but it’s then likely to stand another 1/4 higher.
I also have so many other projects I’m doing in the house.

If I can avoid another I might try to. I can do it if I must.

I’ve found several freestanding stoves that will fit with about 2.5” poking out; they only require ember protection which I have.
 
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EbS-P

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2019
1,206
SE North Carolina
I haven’t found any inserts that only require ember protection. I could take on a project and try to redo the hearth extension but it’s then likely to stand another 1/4 higher.
I also have so many other projects I’m doing in the house.

If I can avoid another I might try to. I can do it if I must.

I’ve found several freestanding stoves that will fit with about 2.5” poking out; they only require ember protection which I have.
I like the look of the stove tucked in the opening. I might even leave the surround off my insert but we will see. i think that the stove over insert to not have to modify hearth is a fine choice. I’d make a similar one. We all make compromises.