Painting single wall stove pipe

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xman23

Minister of Fire
Oct 7, 2008
2,638
Lackawaxen PA
Our 25 year old single wall stove pipe from the stove to the ceiling box is looking a bit shabby. It's black but has blotches.

I know there is high temp paint for this,, but thought it was a spray version. I don't want to spray in the house. Is there a brush on version?

Or do I take it apart and do it outside? Or just replace it with new pipe?

Thanks for any tips you may have
Tom
 
Our 25 year old single wall stove pipe from the stove to the ceiling box is looking a bit shabby. It's black but has blotches.

I know there is high temp paint for this,, but thought it was a spray version. I don't want to spray in the house. Is there a brush on version?

Or do I take it apart and do it outside? Or just replace it with new pipe?

Thanks for any tips you may have
Tom
I always use spray. Typically I just use a cardboard shield behind it and spray in place. But you could definitely pull it down
 
I can understand not wanting to spray inside the house. Even with perfect masking it'll stink up the place.

They do make brush on high temp paint.
 
One benefit of taking it down and painting it outside is the ability to feel the pipe all around to see if there is any steel erosion going on leading to thin walls of the pipe. I had a horizontal section of pipe a couple of years ago develop a small but growing hole on the underside, out of sight, that I only found when I took the pipe off to clean if. We do learn as we go along.
 
you should take it down and take outside to do / please use themolux or stove bright
if you use the cheap stuff it will look bad, and take 10 coats / if you do it a little at a time you can have the shopvac running to suck up the paint fumes / but me as an installer will always take outside
 
Thanks for all the advice, I think I take it outside. If it comes out bad, I'll replace it.
 
If your wanting thw brand new look consider just getting brand new pipe. A rattle can of paint has gone up significantly in price lately. A can of paint might cost as much as 1/2 of brand new pipe that will be good for another 20 years. If you use the stove often there must be some detoration in the 20+ year old pipe.