Pellet stove question

Thomas Maxwell

New Member
Jul 5, 2020
5
Florida
Does anyone know of a pellet stove that will burn larger than wood pellet size fuel? Specifically, hickory nuts. Is there a pellet model most suitable for conversion somehow to burn the larger size nuts. I burn hickory nuts and they can make a nice fire. Trouble is it's only practical to put in a limited amount as the fire will get too vigorous if too much is added to the conventional stove. A hot fire is required too start and the nuts burn nicely. Because only a small amount can be added to the regular stove at one time, the fire requires too much maintenance. Filling a large external hopper with nuts and regular feed as in the pellet stove could provide overnight heat. Any links to pellet stove diagrams would be appreciated.
 

Ctwoodtick

Minister of Fire
Jun 5, 2015
1,266
Southeast CT
I’d be careful with burning things other that manufactures recommendations for fuel. If you had an issue, your insurance company might be not be forgiving if you modified stove like that. That and the stove was tested using pellets. It’s a crap shoot if you’ll mess up your stove.
 

johneh

Minister of Fire
Dec 19, 2009
2,858
Eastern Ontario
If the nuts a broken up so just the shells are burnt
then a multi-fuel stove would burn them just like pellets
 
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Ctwoodtick

Minister of Fire
Jun 5, 2015
1,266
Southeast CT
Oh ok. I hadn’t heard of that before. Thanks
 

Dataman

Minister of Fire
Sep 10, 2018
737
Newport, Wa
They do make stove that burns Presto Logs. Wonder if that would do it?


Be a guess how hickory nuts would work between logs? Expensive Test. Ask them.
 

Highbeam

Minister of Fire
Dec 28, 2006
17,302
Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
Multi fuel stoves burn multiple fuels. Some of the obvious fuels are cherry pits, corn, grains, and there is one oregon guy that loves to burn filbert shells. I think filberts are now called hazelnuts but whatever.

The first google search found a USstove model on amzon that lists "Burns wood pellets, corn, soy beans, cherry pits, olive pits and other compressed biomass fuels " as possible.
 
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Don2222

Minister of Fire
Feb 1, 2010
8,590
Salem NH
There is a member on the forum that burns Hazelnut shells. After the processing plant breaks them up she buys the shells. With a large house and 3 pellet stoves it costs 50 cents per day to heat the house during the winter. :)
For the best heat the fuel must be bone dry. :cool:
 
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SidecarFlip

Minister of Fire
On any pellet stove, fuel size is limited by the pitch of the feed auger flighting. To buen larger sized fuel, you'd have to fabricate a feed auger with 'coarser' flighting and then modify the feed rate accordingly.. Interesting concept, not a cheap date however.

I tried mixing on soybeans one time. Don't do that. Soybeans are an oilseed and combust exceptionally hot so just a tiny amount will do ya just fine. I'm a field corn burner and have been for years. My off grade field corn is free for me so I burn it however, field corn when extremely dry (below) 12% really burns hot so I mix the corn with wood pellets 2-1 to reduce combustion chamber temps and eliminate clinkering.
 
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