Piping out new stove in loft-style house

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woodland_

New Member
Oct 2, 2021
4
RI
In the process of assembling an order list to get all my inside piping and outer stainless chimney for my Drolet 1800, and could use some pointers from someone more experienced than I.

I am piping out through an area that was used for an old exhaust fan on the second level so I don't have to cut a new hole, it's in a convenient center point in the room and not too close to the ceiling. The stove is on the first floor and I will have a large run of interior pipe.
Through reading on here I am concerned about proper draft and having a cold spot somewhere in the chimney, also concerned about the two 90's I will need to install and how that might affect air flow in a lengthy flue.
Also, any ideas on how to achieve the proper offset outside the house to clear my 14" long peak with proper clearance would also be appreciated!! The chimney will come out directly in line with the centerline of roof, I'd prefer to maybe have two opposing 15 degree bends (guessing) somewhere that will push the pipe out roughly 17" at the peak but keep the Tee close to the house for fastening purposes. All help is greatly appreciated!
I am attaching a drawing a made from all the measurements I've taken. The stove is already in place but could be moved slightly if need be.
stove pipe.png
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,567
South Puget Sound, WA
This setup would draft better, clean easier and it would be much less costly if it went straight up and out the roof. That might also provide for stove more placement options in the room.

By this plan I'd at least change the top 90º turn into a pair of 45º elbows with a short offset connector between them. Otherwise that 24" horiz. section is going to accumulate soot and will be hard to clean. Make sure the brand of chimney pipe permits outdoor use of its offset elbows. Many require they be used indoors only.
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
1,931
Long Island NY
Also make it double wall. Less depositing, better flue temps
 
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woodland_

New Member
Oct 2, 2021
4
RI
Thank you for the replies, I am considering one more place to put the stove that would go straight through and use less pipe, but currently where it sits going through the roof is not an option. Our house has a water view so unfortunately part of the placement is a bit of aesthetic and less cost and heating efficient. I certainly like the idea of ridding that first bend and making it two 45's. Can the pipe go into the thimble on any sort of angle? Honestly the way the piping mates through the thimble and transitions to the stainless sections has eluded me
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,567
South Puget Sound, WA
The pipe or fitting connecting to the thimble should be close to straight on and square, but in this case with the 90º one would want it slightly lower in order to pitch 1/4" / ft. uphill toward the chimney. With 45s the last fitting can attach directly to the thimble. There usually will be an adapter at the transition, especially for double-wall connector pipe.

Still I would think about alternative locations that might afford a straight up solution if possible. In our case it required reversing the living room layout. This was a big change, but it has worked out well.
 

Rearscreen

Minister of Fire
Dec 21, 2014
755
Vermont
My brother built his house and has the exact set up. All he had to do was to move it over just enough to clear the ridge beam for a straight shot. However, he has some weird disorder where everything has to centered. I kept telling him the benefits of a straight up set up, but he didn't want to hear it from me. Twice that I know of, he had smoke build up in the stack pipe and it ignited/backpuffed creating quite a fright. Not to mention, cleaning is a pain.
 
Last edited:

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,567
South Puget Sound, WA
My brother built his house and has the exact set up. All he had to do was to move it over just enough to clear the ridge beam for a straight shot. However, he has some weird disorder where everything has to centered. I kept telling him the benefits of a straight up set up, but he didn't want to hear it from me. Twice that I know of, he had smoke build up in the stack pipe and it ignited/backpuffed creating quite a fright. Not to mention, cleaning is a pain.
If that's the case just offset up high, indoors, to miss the beam.
 

woodland_

New Member
Oct 2, 2021
4
RI
Twice that I know of, he had smoke build up in the stack pipe and it ignited/backpuffed creating quite a fright. Not to mention, cleaning is a pain.
This is what I was worried about.. didn't think too much into the cleaning aspect at the time

Still I would think about alternative locations that might afford a straight up solution if possible. In our case it required reversing the living room layout. This was a big change, but it has worked out well.
We are discussing relocating in the room and piping straight out on the low part of the roof about mid-room. It will still be on a view side of the house but would cut about 10 feet out of the entire chimney length and be straight through the roof. My only concern with this setup would be that one of the exterior doors on the side of the house swings right-handed and would be near the stove when fully open. Does a moving door that would normally be closed during cold weather count for clearances? I haven't read anything on that.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,567
South Puget Sound, WA
How close to the door would it be? The moving door might not be a big issue, but it would help to see the area of concern. Can you post a picture or two or a sketch of the floorplan that shows options? If the stove was located in this other area near the door, how much chimney would be poking up through the roof in order to meet the 10-3-2 requirements?

10-3-2 rule.JPG

If the stove was in the first location, would it be possible to put an offset in the indoor connector pipe, up high, to avoid the ridge beam?
 
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woodland_

New Member
Oct 2, 2021
4
RI
How close to the door would it be? The moving door might not be a big issue, but it would help to see the area of concern. Can you post a picture or two or a sketch of the floorplan that shows options?
If the stove was in the first location, would it be possible to put an offset in the indoor connector pipe, up high, to avoid the ridge beam?
It would be close to the door, the span between the window and the door area would be about 45" absolute maximum, and that is about the size of my current hearth, the stove has about 10" on either side of it centered on the hearth. I could slightly push it towards the window side with a slight forfeit of symmetry, but with the door wide open there would be about 10" from the door to the side of the stove.
If the stove was in the first location, would it be possible to put an offset in the indoor connector pipe, up high, to avoid the ridge beam?
This is possible, but I would have to investigate further. The more we've been discussing actually moving it, the more we are growing fond of the idea of the chimney being away or less visible from the water side of the house, but I haven't ruled it out.
If the stove was located in this other area near the door, how much chimney would be poking up through the roof in order to meet the 10-3-2 requirements?
The roof has a normal pitch, not excessive so I think the minimum requirement would suffice.

I've attached a rough sketch of the layout, emphasis on rough
layout.png

ext.png