Question about Regency Cascades airmate

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t0asty

New Member
Oct 12, 2021
21
NJ
Hello,

I am replacing my wood stove (currently have an old solid cast iron Defiant 1975) with a newer more efficient stove and I like the "hybrid catalytic" models. I think I am settled on the Regency Cascades F2500 or possibly F3500 depending if it will fit. My question is regarding the airmate. Would it make sense to have the airmate without the blower fan or would that essentially do nothing for me? I am used to running my current cast iron stove most of the winter to supplement my oil burner and it gets so hot I really don't need a fan at all. The blower will add a couple inches and I am already pushing the limits on my depth clearance.

Additionally, I imagine the Regency stove top gets extremely hot despite it being a different material. Hot enough to boil some water, spin a conduction fan, etc?

Thank you!
 

t0asty

New Member
Oct 12, 2021
21
NJ
for clarification, I have this wood stove currently (stock image).

unnamed.jpg
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,681
central pa
Hello,

I am replacing my wood stove (currently have an old solid cast iron Defiant 1975) with a newer more efficient stove and I like the "hybrid catalytic" models. I think I am settled on the Regency Cascades F2500 or possibly F3500 depending if it will fit. My question is regarding the airmate. Would it make sense to have the airmate without the blower fan or would that essentially do nothing for me? I am used to running my current cast iron stove most of the winter to supplement my oil burner and it gets so hot I really don't need a fan at all. The blower will add a couple inches and I am already pushing the limits on my depth clearance.

Additionally, I imagine the Regency stove top gets extremely hot despite it being a different material. Hot enough to boil some water, spin a conduction fan, etc?

Thank you!
I would choose the 3500 over one of the cascades. The durability of a moving cat is questionable and I don't really think they are using the heat from the cat effectively at all on the cascades
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
93,751
South Puget Sound, WA
Yes, it should get hot enough to boil water or run a thermal fan. If the Defiant ran too hot then the F2500 or F2450 should suffice. The F2450 is non-cat.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,681
central pa
@bholler for clarification, are you suggesting the Pro-Series 3500 over the Cascades 3500? As the 3500 and the 2500 are essentially the same just the 3500 has a larger firebox no?
Yes I didn't realize they had introduced a cascades 3500. They didn't send me new paperwork yet.

But yes pro series or noncat
 

t0asty

New Member
Oct 12, 2021
21
NJ
Yes, it should get hot enough to boil water or run a thermal fan. If the Defiant ran too hot then the F2500 or F2450 should suffice. The F2450 is non-hybrid.
Thanks @begreen , I am looking for a stove that has longer burn times, burns efficiently, but I can also run real hot when needed. The 2500 seems to check all of the boxes and should fit where my current Defiant is. It also has left side damper which is what I need (placed in a corner). As I said I am supplementing my primary heating source which is baseboard hot water. Is it fair to say the Cascades F2500 is more popular than the F3500 model?
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
93,751
South Puget Sound, WA
That's a better question for bholler, he sells and installs Regency stoves.
 

t0asty

New Member
Oct 12, 2021
21
NJ
Yes I didn't realize they had introduced a cascades 3500. They didn't send me new paperwork yet.

But yes pro series or noncat
Thanks again. You know what, I didn't even realize in my pamphlet the F2500 was a Cascades and the 3500 was a Pro-Series until you said that. I am not 100% the F3500 is going to fit in my current location so I might have to stay with the F2500. If you don't mind explaining, what makes the Pro-Series more efficient at utilizing the cat than the Cascades? They are both hybrids so they move have a moving cat or no?
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,681
central pa
No the cascades have a cat that slides forward and back acting as the bypass. The pro the cat is stationary. In the cascades when the cat is engaged it is under the exhaust pipe so any heat created by the cat goes up.the stack
 
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t0asty

New Member
Oct 12, 2021
21
NJ
No the cascades have a cat that slides forward and back acting as the bypass. The pro the cat is stationary. In the cascades when the cat is engaged it is under the exhaust pipe so any heat created by the cat goes up.the stack
I see that on the diagram now. Apologies for the many questions, I think this is my last one if you don't mind. It looks like the Pro-Series has a damper after the cat to retain the heat, and the Cascades does not? Is this true? I realize the cat is directly below the pipe on the Cascades whereas the Pro-Series it is positioned maybe a few inches in front of the pipe. This is enough to make a noticeable difference in heat output?
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,681
central pa
I see that on the diagram now. Apologies for the many questions, I think this is my last one if you don't mind. It looks like the Pro-Series has a damper after the cat to retain the heat, and the Cascades does not? Is this true? I realize the cat is directly below the pipe on the Cascades whereas the Pro-Series it is positioned maybe a few inches in front of the pipe. This is enough to make a noticeable difference in heat output?
The damper on the pro line is a bypass not to retain heat. On startup you open it and it bypasses the cat to get things up to temp you then close it sending the exhaust through the cat. And yes having the cat Infront of the exhaust a bit makes a huge difference
 
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t0asty

New Member
Oct 12, 2021
21
NJ
Again I apologize for the numerous questions but this is a potentially big purchase and I want to make sure I am confident. To put it bluntly, is Catalytic really worth it?

I understand if it all runs as advertised and you are very careful it will increase efficiency. However, I am the type of person who will get wood from mostly anywhere I can that is free. Ash, Oak, Maple, Tulip/Poplar. Sometimes its been seasoned awhile and sometimes I throw it in when its not. Also, I usually load up my fires in the evening and let them die out into the night with the damper closed, this seems to be an issue with the cat's as they are supposed to be active with a temp of 500 minimum. With it being an expensive piece to replace and "worry about" to me it almost defeats the purpose of the cost effectiveness and ease of wood stoves (pending you have plentiful wood supply as I do).
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
28,681
central pa
Again I apologize for the numerous questions but this is a potentially big purchase and I want to make sure I am confident. To put it bluntly, is Catalytic really worth it?

I understand if it all runs as advertised and you are very careful it will increase efficiency. However, I am the type of person who will get wood from mostly anywhere I can that is free. Ash, Oak, Maple, Tulip/Poplar. Sometimes its been seasoned awhile and sometimes I throw it in when its not. Also, I usually load up my fires in the evening and let them die out into the night with the damper closed, this seems to be an issue with the cat's as they are supposed to be active with a temp of 500 minimum. With it being an expensive piece to replace and "worry about" to me it almost defeats the purpose of the cost effectiveness and ease of wood stoves (pending you have plentiful wood supply as I do).
First off any modern stove cat or not is going to need properly dried wood to work properly. That means 20% moisture content or less. The species doesn't really matter other than denser hardwoods have more BTUs per piece of wood than less dense woods like pine etc.

As far as if a cat is worth the trouble that depends on the stove and your needs. Cats allow you to turn the stove down more and still burn cleanly.
 
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