Real, actual, fast rural internet is almost here.

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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,572
South Puget Sound, WA
StarLink does not have a coverage map but I just noticed that there is a map of sorts here:

The known invite range is 44.9°N to 51.1°N at the moment.

The 900 or so satellites are in non-geosynchronous orbits so they cover all of the planet except the polar regions. Another launch of 60 satellites is scheduled for tonight, BTW.

Here is a live map of all the satellites And
here is an how to for the map
We're in that latitude but have not received an invite yet. They may already have enough beta sites in WA state.
 
Sep 2, 2020
122
UP, Michigan, USA
We're in that latitude but have not received an invite yet. They may already have enough beta sites in WA state.
When did you apply for the beta on their website?
 

SidecarFlip

Minister of Fire
Feb 7, 2010
5,273
S.E. Michigan
Hummm. Very interesting to the degree I need to look deeper into this.
Getting tired of paying for DSL that is very slow and there is no way I'll be seeing CATV anytime soon.
Considering the crap on TV today, I prefer not to view it anyway.
 

WiscWoody

Minister of Fire
Dec 24, 2011
2,025
Winter WI
Wow I bet your just giddy to get that kind of internet in the sticks!? I also live in a very rural area but we have a fairly good DSL service here, it isn‘t blazing fast at 25Mb/s down and 2 up but it’s only $40 a month, no fees or taxes added and they say as long as your in good standing it’ll never go up. So far I’ve had it for ten years and the price has only gone down when they dropped the fees and taxes. Also there‘s no limits and its fast enough to stream 4K TV so I’m ok with it. A friend pays $140 for crappy 2Mb/s DSL in a rural area. They make him pay for a wired phone and he doesn‘t even have it hooked up and if he complains about the speed they tell him if he don’t like it to drop the service so he’s looking forward to StarLink.
 
Sep 2, 2020
122
UP, Michigan, USA
Wow I bet your just giddy to get that kind of internet in the sticks!? I also live in a very rural area but we have a fairly good DSL service here, it isn‘t blazing fast at 25Mb/s down and 2 up but it’s only $40 a month, no fees or taxes added and they say as long as your in good standing it’ll never go up. So far I’ve had it for ten years and the price has only gone down when they dropped the fees and taxes. Also there‘s no limits and its fast enough to stream 4K TV so I’m ok with it. A friend pays $140 for crappy 2Mb/s DSL in a rural area. They make him pay for a wired phone and he doesn‘t even have it hooked up and if he complains about the speed they tell him if he don’t like it to drop the service so he’s looking forward to StarLink.
Yep, giddy is a good description. We are too far out to get DSL, Cable, Cell or Microwave. Satellite is it.
 
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festerw

Minister of Fire
Nov 16, 2009
526
Cambridge Springs, PA
Wow I bet your just giddy to get that kind of internet in the sticks!? I also live in a very rural area but we have a fairly good DSL service here, it isn‘t blazing fast at 25Mb/s down and 2 up but it’s only $40 a month, no fees or taxes added and they say as long as your in good standing it’ll never go up. So far I’ve had it for ten years and the price has only gone down when they dropped the fees and taxes. Also there‘s no limits and its fast enough to stream 4K TV so I’m ok with it. A friend pays $140 for crappy 2Mb/s DSL in a rural area. They make him pay for a wired phone and he doesn‘t even have it hooked up and if he complains about the speed they tell him if he don’t like it to drop the service so he’s looking forward to StarLink.

If your friend has any kind of cell signal, wireless could be an option. I've been running it for the last 3 years. Usually somewhere in the 10-20 range, but I recently switched to Verizon and I'm seeing 40-50. Both are under $80/month.

I just put in a request for Starlink though, I'd pay extra for those speeds but I'm on the south side of Lake Erie so I'm not expecting it anytime soon.
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
6,271
Downeast Maine
If your friend has any kind of cell signal, wireless could be an option. I've been running it for the last 3 years. Usually somewhere in the 10-20 range, but I recently switched to Verizon and I'm seeing 40-50. Both are under $80/month.

I just put in a request for Starlink though, I'd pay extra for those speeds but I'm on the south side of Lake Erie so I'm not expecting it anytime soon.
When we were living in an RV full time we used T-Mobile with unlimited hotspot plans. We were able to stream video and do everything else just fine. I feel like any connection faster than 25 mbps up and 10 down is just gravy.
 
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festerw

Minister of Fire
Nov 16, 2009
526
Cambridge Springs, PA
When we were living in an RV full time we used T-Mobile with unlimited hotspot plans. We were able to stream video and do everything else just fine. I feel like any connection faster than 25 mbps up and 10 down is just gravy.

They've fortunately started rolling out 4G Home Internet unlimited for a reasonable cost, deprioritization doesn't seem to affect this as much as the phone data.

The slower one worked when just my wife was home working, but we all ended up quarantined for 2 weeks with my exposure at work and it struggled with her and I working and my daughter attending school. So far no issues with VZW other than I hate giving them money.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,572
South Puget Sound, WA
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Sep 2, 2020
122
UP, Michigan, USA
Ars Technica has some good articles on the process and progress.
Accurate articles but already becoming dated. Drop-outs and speed degradation has already begun to improve, at least where we are.

And yeah, this feels like alien/future tech. Especially when it is first plugged in and you watch the dish tilt and rotate on its own as it finds the section of sky with the most satellites whizzing by, then self calibrate and lock it in. I’ve watched satellite TV installers take hours to do the same job.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
90,572
South Puget Sound, WA
Accurate articles but already becoming dated. Drop-outs and speed degradation has already begun to improve, at least where we are.

And yeah, this feels like alien/future tech. Especially when it is first plugged in and you watch the dish tilt and rotate on its own as it finds the section of sky with the most satellites whizzing by, then self calibrate and lock it in. I’ve watched satellite TV installers take hours to do the same job.
Yes, they point that out. The point of the beta program is to work out these problems and improve the system including the user interface. The goal is a simple plug&play experience. I see in WA state they now have 4 ground stations to improve connectivity too. Word is by January that the coverage and reliability changes will be major.