Regency i1100 Firebrick and Baffle

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dragon73

New Member
Jan 16, 2014
11
Berkshires, MA
Just purchased a used Regency i1100 and want to get burning as quickly as possible. I have two questions:

1) Can I use standard fire bricks to line the firebox?
2) Can I use standard fire bricks to temporarily replace the baffle? (4 bricks across fit quite well)

As for the fire bricks, the manual says to use part number 902-111 bricks (same bricks used for the i3100 and H2100). I have read here that some people have used standard bricks, but I am not sure if there is anything unsafe with using them. As for the baffle. I know that it uses a special vermiculite type of brick with an overlap in the middle. However, I am wondering if I can use standard fire bricks to replace the baffle until I can get a new baffle set. The dimensions are almost perfect for me to put 4 fire bricks across the top tubes. It will be 1/4" short from front to back, but tight from left to right. The 1 1/4" thickness is the same. I know that it might not be as efficient, but I just want some heat now! As long as it is not going to create a hazard or damage the stove, I would like to try it. Any thoughts?
 
Go for it. The standard fire bricks in the fire box will be just fine, tho some may have to be cut. A tile-cutting wetsaw works very well...
As long as there is NO gap between the bricks on the air tubes, you will be fine using them temporarily...
 
Thanks Dasky. That was what I was hoping for. If any air gaps are bad in the baffle, would it make sense to put a piece of sheet metal cut to size under the fire bricks used for the baffles? I've got some leftover 26ga galvanized from making the block off plate. Or maybe just some 9" x 1-1/2" strips of 1/4" steel under the joints and sides? Does the baffle have to be touching the pipes?

As a side note, it's nice it was you that replied to my first post as I see we are almost neighbors. I am just over the border in Williamstown, MA. I often travel right past you on my way to Albany.
 
I'd put the metal ON TOP of the fire bricks. If you put it underneath, that will be a harsher environment & the metal can distort, potentially moving the firebricks from their correct positioning.
Small world, dragon. My ex-wife's family lives in W'mstown & my ex-girlfriend is from North Adams...
 
Here are some pictures of the firebricks as a baffle in my stove. I cut a very skinny wedge to fill the gap (1/8 tapered up to 3/16). I hope it will hold up and not just crumble under the heat. Do you think I need to add the metal on top or is this tight enough? Also, the metal piece on the inside front of the stove is is all bent up and there is a crack in the middle of it. Is this okay or do I need to repair it?
 

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Hey Daksy, small world indeed. Nice to know you are around. Thanks for the help. If you ever need anything, let me know. I have a pretty strong back and have been told that I at least have half a brain ;)
 
regular brick should work to get you started but I would order the right ones and the right baffle. they will work better
 
Just as an FYI it often takes some time getting replacement baffles from Regency. I ordered a spare set just in case and it was several weeks for them to arrive. I'm just saying this so whatever you will do to address the gaps (keep in mind that things will wiggle around a little) is meant to last a little while. I think I'd go for a section of plate steel something thicker than 1/8's that is the same size as the baffle to prevent gap problems. A steel shop could easily cut one to size in seconds for you if you don't have the materials and tools for that. Hope that helps.
 
Why would the lighter pumice brick be better than the regular brick? The pumice bricks were really worn down. I have never seen that with regular bricks. If I only use the regular bricks, will I have any problems with the stove over time? I would rather use the regular bricks as I have already cut them to fit the firebox and don't really want to spend more money on bricks than I have to.

My understanding of the baffle is that it insulates the firebox and makes the flue gasses have to travel further inside the firebox so that the gases have a longer time to burn. And the pipes on top bring in more air for a secondary burn, correct? So if the gasses bypass the baffle, they won't be able to have a secondary burn thus lowering the efficiency of the stove? Want to make sure I am understanding what is going on in my stove.

Do you think if I went with 1/4" steel plate, it would reduce the space above the baffle too much? There is not a lot of space between the top of the stove and the baffle so I am not sure how this would affect the airflow. Also, I don't think I need the plate to be the entire width of the baffle. I would think it only needs to be wide enough to cover all of the gaps plus a little more. I am thinking 13" should do it. That would give a 2" overlap on the outer gaps. I am not even sure if a plate the entire baffle width would be able to fit up there easily. So do you think try to get the full 18" or should 13" do it? The other issue I am thinking about is that if the plate warps at all, it will render it much less effective, yes? Will 1/4" steel plate warp from the temperatures above the baffle?
 
Do you think if I went with 1/4" steel plate, it would reduce the space above the baffle too much? There is not a lot of space between the top of the stove and the baffle so I am not sure how this would affect the airflow. Also, I don't think I need the plate to be the entire width of the baffle. I would think it only needs to be wide enough to cover all of the gaps plus a little more. I am thinking 13" should do it. That would give a 2" overlap on the outer gaps. I am not even sure if a plate the entire baffle width would be able to fit up there easily. So do you think try to get the full 18" or should 13" do it? The other issue I am thinking about is that if the plate warps at all, it will render it much less effective, yes? Will 1/4" steel plate warp from the temperatures above the baffle?

I preface almost anything I say here with the honest and humble comment that I am not an expert at this stove specific stuff but I think that completely covering the gaps plus giving some extra coverage essentially would work well. I don't think it needs to be edge to edge within the firebox. Also within reason (in other words as long as you can get it in and also get it out) I don't think any warpage with the steel plate should matter much; the plate's there to prevent the fire from escaping from the firebox prematurely and probably also to prevent the primary and secondary flames from directly driving into the top of the firebox. So even if it warps a bit it basically will still serve those two functions. I'd say if you can get 1/4 plate to fit there use that and make it like 2/3 as wide as the interior of the firebox and you're GTG. If 1/4 plate is too thick then just get the thickest plate you can but no less that 1/8 and you're probably still GTG. I would go wider than just the "little more" like you mentioned just so you don't have to screw around with aligning it precisely but an overlap of an inch or so past the gaps of the outermost firebricks should be simple to get in, get out and center without too much fuss. Hope that helps.

PS This thread has inspired me to go ahead and cut some 1/4 plate to the size that I'd need. And I always have several boxes of firebrick ready to rock so if in a really screwed up scenario I managed to mess up my original baffle and my spare baffle, I'd still be able to adapt to use the stove without any worry.
 
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