Roofing

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EatenByLimestone

Minister of Fire
A roof i priced out in December is 25% more expensive when I priced it out this week. But what can you do? The roof is toast. I'm not positive it would last through the winter.
 

clancey

Minister of Fire
Feb 26, 2021
1,782
Colorado
The lumber prices are down somewhat but they have other problems but lower than it was and I need a new roof too and just trying to stretch it out with patching if I have to at least for this winter...You could do the same especially if you are handy with diy projects and stuff...If you want a steel roof that is really high at least in my area for I have priced some of the roofs and would have to take out a mortgage to put a steel roof on...Hang in there forum person and we will make it through the winter even if we have to patch and fix as we go--terrible but that's my reality too...What am I to do?. old mrs clancey.
 

Sawset

Minister of Fire
Feb 14, 2015
1,219
Palmyra, WI
Having a new roof here put on next week. I see today there was a delivery of 35sheets of 1/2 osb for the flat rubber portion.
11-20 was the date, manufactured in Michigan. That would be 9 mo ago, 500mi away. Hmm. Been sitting in a warehouse somewhere.
 
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clancey

Minister of Fire
Feb 26, 2021
1,782
Colorado
Yea there are serious questions to think about and I say Hmm too. Now if you signed a contract with someone certainly have it done but if you do it yourself that is another story. Me I have to contract out to someone and to get the roof that I want is a lot of money plus adding solar to all of this would be a arm and a leg so to speak...so I am going to wait and try to make it through the winter that is approaching fast. If your not contracted out to a roofer I suggest you wait to and make due until spring but buy the supplies that you might need and store them for I think the prices are going to go "sky high" after staying about level for awhile----just my opinion and suggestion here. I think people are feeling it across the nation--I think that they are feeling insecure about the future and that's why the wood burning stove without electricity seems to be a big seller at this point. I could be very wrong but this is my inner feeling on all of this so I say make it through this winter and decide to get it done in the spring if you did not sign a contract and just put a lot of buckets down and fix the problems as you go. Whatever you decide it will be 'right' for you and I am just giving my opinion here..I am fortunate because I have flooring and walls in the attic with electricity and I can actually see my roof without other structures in the way so I can wait and if it goes to leaking patching and buckets will just have to do..of course my insulation under the dry wall in the roof area will be toast but I will handle it...Now if it would drift down to the second floor--that might be serious especially if you cannot see it..Just my opinion and nothing else..clancey
 

EatenByLimestone

Minister of Fire
I'll be doing it myself. Steel roof. I'm doing a lot of extra so I won't have to do it again and to help keep the summer heat out.. Asphalt tear off, complete ice and water shield, horizontal firing straps of 2x4 with foam board in between, then metal roof on top. Luckily it's the cabin, so only 600 sq ft of roof. Still $4k with the extra work though.

I've never seen th e bottom shingle through the top before. It has me a bit worried.

20210828_170557.jpg 20210828_170600.jpg
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
6,313
Downeast Maine
I'll be doing it myself. Steel roof. I'm doing a lot of extra so I won't have to do it again and to help keep the summer heat out.. Asphalt tear off, complete ice and water shield, horizontal firing straps of 2x4 with foam board in between, then metal roof on top. Luckily it's the cabin, so only 600 sq ft of roof. Still $4k with the extra work though.

I've never seen th e bottom shingle through the top before. It has me a bit worried.

View attachment 281559 View attachment 281560
I haven't heard of anyone putting foam board between strapping. Maybe we will do that before we lay down metal roofing.
 

marty319

Feeling the Heat
Nov 17, 2014
394
Belair mb
I'll be doing it myself. Steel roof. I'm doing a lot of extra so I won't have to do it again and to help keep the summer heat out.. Asphalt tear off, complete ice and water shield, horizontal firing straps of 2x4 with foam board in between, then metal roof on top. Luckily it's the cabin, so only 600 sq ft of roof. Still $4k with the extra work though.

I've never seen th e bottom shingle through the top before. It has me a bit worried.

View attachment 281559 View attachment 281560
I did my metal roof 10 years ago roof was around 1100 sq feet.was 1900 for material all in and I have 2 big valleys.now my friend is doing her cabin in metal and 40 year 29 ga metal is $ 1.25 a sq ft.
 

EatenByLimestone

Minister of Fire
I haven't heard of anyone putting foam board between strapping. Maybe we will do that before we lay down metal roofing.
Yeah, I've never seen anybody do it exactly like I am. Some pretty close, but not the same way. The insulation is mostly to keep heat out in the summer. I have insulation on the ceiling already to keep the heat in come winter. I was thrown a curve ball when I found out the recommend screwing it down every 2 feet. I'd planned on 4. Not a big deal though.
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
6,313
Downeast Maine
Yeah, I've never seen anybody do it exactly like I am. Some pretty close, but not the same way. The insulation is mostly to keep heat out in the summer. I have insulation on the ceiling already to keep the heat in come winter. I was thrown a curve ball when I found out the recommend screwing it down every 2 feet. I'd planned on 4. Not a big deal though.
I assumed it was for the summer heat. Have you considered using the foil faced foam?
 

EatenByLimestone

Minister of Fire
That's what I'll be using. I'm not sure the radiant barrier will do much given the lack of an air space over it, but there might be enough space for convection under the ribs and the aluminum may allow some conduction from the flat parts to the rib areas. The big hope is that the pure R value severely slows down the attic heating up in the first place.

There's a guy with a 50s trailer a little ways down from my place. 10 years ago he EPDMd his roof. He decided to add some slope. He placed a 6 or 8"pvc pipe down the middle and layed 3" blue board over it. I think it's styrofoam. White EPDM went over the foam. It's amazing how cool it keeps that metal box. Unfortunately I can't use white, but I can match his foam, leave the attic air space, and then make the heat work through another batch of insulation.
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
6,313
Downeast Maine
That's what I'll be using. I'm not sure the radiant barrier will do much given the lack of an air space over it, but there might be enough space for convection under the ribs and the aluminum may allow some conduction from the flat parts to the rib areas. The big hope is that the pure R value severely slows down the attic heating up in the first place.

There's a guy with a 50s trailer a little ways down from my place. 10 years ago he EPDMd his roof. He decided to add some slope. He placed a 6 or 8"pvc pipe down the middle and layed 3" blue board over it. I think it's styrofoam. White EPDM went over the foam. It's amazing how cool it keeps that metal box. Unfortunately I can't use white, but I can match his foam, leave the attic air space, and then make the heat work through another batch of insulation.
The drift train is leaving the station ;lol

Since we are doing a reno on an existing structure I wasn't able to put the foam on the outside of the structure, our roof overhang is very traditional (as in zero overhang). Eventually we will do the roof and have a bit more overhang, but that's more than five years out. Instead of radiant foam barrier outside we are going to use the Mylar faced bubble sheeting (3/8" thick) on the inside of our studs, followed by 1" strapping and then diagonal or vertical face nailed boards. The long term plan is to hire out a metal roof to be installed, but we haven't decided on standing seam, metal shingles, or maybe even a copper roof if economics improve.
 

marty319

Feeling the Heat
Nov 17, 2014
394
Belair mb
The drift train is leaving the station ;lol

Since we are doing a reno on an existing structure I wasn't able to put the foam on the outside of the structure, our roof overhang is very traditional (as in zero overhang). Eventually we will do the roof and have a bit more overhang, but that's more than five years out. Instead of radiant foam barrier outside we are going to use the Mylar faced bubble sheeting (3/8" thick) on the inside of our studs, followed by 1" strapping and then diagonal or vertical face nailed boards. The long term plan is to hire out a metal roof to be installed, but we haven't decided on standing seam, metal shingles, or maybe even a copper roof if economics improve.
If I had to do my metal roof over again I would go metal shingles or metal tiles.there's a few cottages around here that have standing seam and imo do not like the look of it.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
26,207
central pa
As someone who is on roofs all the time stop putting metal on every damn roof.
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
6,313
Downeast Maine
As someone who is on roofs all the time stop putting metal on every damn roof.
I'm also considering wooden shingles, but really I just want whatever will last the longest.
 
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SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
6,313
Downeast Maine
Those aren't any better lol. Metal is a great roof I Just hate having to work on them
Do the grippy shoes help? I figured cedar shingles would be easier to walk on.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
26,207
central pa
Do the grippy shoes help? I figured cedar shingles would be easier to walk on.
Yes but it depends on the pitch. New cedar isn't bad. Once it gets old I won't step on them
 

peakbagger

Minister of Fire
Jul 11, 2008
6,628
Northern NH
To continue the drift a bit, eastern white cedar shake roofs can and do last 100 years. Add in a ice and water shield underlayment and they are hard to beat plus its a local sustainable product near your location in Maine. The key is you need to go with thicker than standard shake which means buying them custom. Check out this place in Corinth Maine (NE of Bangor)https://www.dowseasternwhiteshingles.com/ . Its nice fit for Maine.

Sadly slate roof shingles used to be made in Maine (Monson) . They also would last 100 plus years but are a very expensive option.
 
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SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
6,313
Downeast Maine
To continue the drift a bit, eastern white cedar shake roofs can and do last 100 years. Add in a ice and water shield underlayment and they are hard to beat plus its a local sustainable product near your location in Maine. The key is you need to go with thicker than standard shake which means buying them custom. Check out this place in Corinth Maine (NE of Bangor)https://www.dowseasternwhiteshingles.com/ . Its nice fit for Maine.

Sadly slate roof shingles used to be made in Maine (Monson) . They also would last 100 plus years but are a very expensive option.
I lived in an old plantation house converted to apartment building back in the early 90's and it still had a slate roof. A few houses in town also had them, but they have all probably been replaced by now.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
26,207
central pa
There are still a fair number of slate roofs here. And no chance in hell I will step on them. Those are lift jobs every time.
 

peakbagger

Minister of Fire
Jul 11, 2008
6,628
Northern NH
I think it comes down to that a typical american is rarely in the same house longer than their 20 year mortgage. Most move for work or move to a larger home. in that case its not worth it to put in 50 or 100 year roof. I see many retirement homes getting built with high end roofs and rarely does the original owner stay there for more than 10 years before downsizing. Decades ago there was the concept of a generational home where the house got passed on through the generations but that is a rarity.
Architectural shingles can make 30 years (optimistically) and a heck of lot quicker to go down with somewhat unskilled labor. Slate is heavy and a bear to repair or modify, its labor intensive to put down and few still have the skills. Cedar shakes take longer to install than shingles and have higher first cost.
Hidden seam steel roofs are a nice long term option but skilled labor is needed to install them especially it there are a lot of details. Many folks go with exposed fastener steel roofs but the rubber washers on the screws have a 20 year life. Both Slate and steel have a problem in winter with snow slides. Snow brakes can be installed but that can put a lot of dead weight on the roof.
 

Bad LP

Minister of Fire
Nov 28, 2014
1,802
Northern Maine
To continue the drift a bit, eastern white cedar shake roofs can and do last 100 years. Add in a ice and water shield underlayment and they are hard to beat plus its a local sustainable product near your location in Maine. The key is you need to go with thicker than standard shake which means buying them custom. Check out this place in Corinth Maine (NE of Bangor)https://www.dowseasternwhiteshingles.com/ . Its nice fit for Maine.

Sadly slate roof shingles used to be made in Maine (Monson) . They also would last 100 plus years but are a very expensive option.
Monson Slate AKA Shelden Slate is still going strong and you're correct, It aint cheap by a long shot.
 

peakbagger

Minister of Fire
Jul 11, 2008
6,628
Northern NH
Monson Slate AKA Shelden Slate is still going strong and you're correct, It aint cheap by a long shot.
Thanks, I guess I was sort of right, they get the raw material from the quarries in Monson and then process the raw slate in New York.
 

Bad LP

Minister of Fire
Nov 28, 2014
1,802
Northern Maine
Thanks, I guess I was sort of right, they get the raw material from the quarries in Monson and then process the raw slate in New York.
What’s strange is it must be low volume shipping as I don’t see a lot of truck traffic that could be slate moving around the area.

They are just outside ‘Uptown’ Monson that has had a huge shot in the arm from the artist community. Totally reformed the center.

Tidbit of useless information is that JFK’s headstone is from them.

I needed to redo a slate porch floor that was Monson Slate. I expected it to be easier. Priced a countertop and that was a bit out of my reach re: cost. image.jpg
But I could afford a set of these coasters.
 
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