Small stove question

sambucadog

New Member
Jan 6, 2017
20
New Jersey
Based on this info it's possible the current installation is not legal as far as clearances go. There are some possible stoves but they would need to have the back to be right up against the brick which means that rear wall must be entirely non-combustible for the stove height.
I'm sure it was installed before permits were required. But the brick behind it is pretty non combustible IMHO.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
84,212
South Puget Sound, WA
Check I the jotul f100. It may work for you.
Tiny, has a 2-4 hr burn time. I thought of the F3CB too, but not much longer for burn time, especially when it's cold outside and you are pushing it.
 

rwhite

Minister of Fire
Nov 8, 2011
1,633
North Central Idaho
Tiny, has a 2-4 hr burn time. I thought of the F3CB too, but not much longer for burn time, especially when it's cold outside and you are pushing it.
I don't think the stove exists that's wanted. Either extend the space or live with 3 hour burns.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
84,212
South Puget Sound, WA
I'm sure it was installed before permits were required. But the brick behind it is pretty non combustible IMHO.
It helps, but if there is wood behind it then there is heat transferred through the brick. Brick against wood allows a 33% clearance reduction only.
 

sambucadog

New Member
Jan 6, 2017
20
New Jersey
It helps, but if there is wood behind it then there is heat transferred through the brick. Brick against wood allows a 33% clearance reduction only.
I actually still know where the previous owner lives...will get in touch and see if he remembers what's behind there!
 

Babaganoosh

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2014
713
NJ
The absolute steel hybrid is 20 inches deep. You can load from the side so you don't need a large clearance out front.
 

quietstorm

Member
Nov 8, 2014
11
Eastern PA
I was steered towards the t4 about a year and a half ago and could not be happier with it. With good hard wood I can pack it full at 9:30 at night, have the air fully closed at 10:15 and when I get up at 5 have enough coals to keep it going. I know it's not nearly as long as larger stoves but for my smaller living space it works great.
 

DBoon

Minister of Fire
Jan 14, 2009
1,179
Central NY
The Lopi Answer is less than 20" deep and double-jacketed, so it has reduced clearance requirements. It is a 1.6 cubic foot firebox, and while others will tell you otherwise, I can tell you that I can get 10 hours to a reload from coals with good, dry hardwoods (maple, ash, hickory) if I fill the stove full.
 

sambucadog

New Member
Jan 6, 2017
20
New Jersey
Perhaps a Jotul 118 CB with its long north south design would be a good choice by installing it parallel to the wall.
Nice stove, but I don't want the side being the only thing I'd see when I come down the stairs. The stove is sort of the focal point of the whole room. Thanks for the suggestion though..I'm seeing a lot of stoves that I didn't know existed.
 

sambucadog

New Member
Jan 6, 2017
20
New Jersey
I was steered towards the t4 about a year and a half ago and could not be happier with it. With good hard wood I can pack it full at 9:30 at night, have the air fully closed at 10:15 and when I get up at 5 have enough coals to keep it going. I know it's not nearly as long as larger stoves but for my smaller living space it works great.
That's good to know!
 

sambucadog

New Member
Jan 6, 2017
20
New Jersey
The Lopi Answer is less than 20" deep and double-jacketed, so it has reduced clearance requirements. It is a 1.6 cubic foot firebox, and while others will tell you otherwise, I can tell you that I can get 10 hours to a reload from coals with good, dry hardwoods (maple, ash, hickory) if I fill the stove full.
Too modern looking like one of the others. Sounds like a great stove though!
 

sambucadog

New Member
Jan 6, 2017
20
New Jersey
I spoke with the previous owner today and he thinks that the sheetrock was all ripped out and some sort of fire barrier put in behind the bricks on top. On the bottom is definitely cinder blocks behind the brick. All this done in the early 1980's. I'm going to go down to city hall on Monday and see if they have records that far back with permit and inspection info.
 

blacktail

Minister of Fire
Sep 18, 2011
1,416
Western WA
Too modern looking like one of the others. Sounds like a great stove though!
It's a black box with a window. I think the republic 1250 is the same stove minus a couple of cosmetic touches.
 

Darl Bundren

Member
Jan 9, 2008
96
WNC
One workaround would be to remove the carpet from the hearth all the way to what looks like stairs? Then lay down some tile or slate in that area. That would look finished and attractive and would provide the ember protection needed.
This is what I thought, too. If it's on a slab, you could remove the carpet, stain and finish the concrete, and increase your stove choice options. Another thing to consider is colder air will collect in the lower area, so you may still have to deal with temp differences even after install (though that's only my guess). I would place functionality and features over appearance as far as priorities go. For instance, I really like having an ash drawer, side load, and soapstone radiance on my Keystone. And it works great. Good luck with the search!
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
84,212
South Puget Sound, WA

wayne.nestor

Member
Nov 3, 2016
127
Baltimore MD
If clearances are the issue, look at the Summers Heat 2000 ( England Madison / 50-SHSSW01 ). It has awesome clearance specs and puts out decent heat ( 50K Plus BTU). You only need ember / spark protection on the floor, 9 inches from the rear, and 22 on the sides if I remember correctly. I can't seem to break the 6-7 hour mark though even though they claim 8. Could be the underseasoned wood though. So far it's keeping my whole house at 70-75 with it being 15 F outside. I've gotten her up to almost 90 on the first floor though lol.

http://low.es/1FqfIHf

a80a795ed9da2e7e0207119b60611468.jpg
0a6b83034519f5e2f0ef3bf7dde122a1.jpg

Sent from my SM-G935T using Tapatalk
 

sambucadog

New Member
Jan 6, 2017
20
New Jersey
Hampton H200 is 20" deep, 1.34 cu ft. and the H300 is 24" deep, 1.71 cu ft..
Both would work. The larger H300 would be my choice if the wall checks out. Getting the rear wall construction for clearances defined is critical to the long term safety of the installation.

https://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/hampton-h200-wood-stove-review.73905/
https://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/newbie-looking-for-advice-on-hampton-h300.55
Hampton H200 is 20" deep, 1.34 cu ft. and the H300 is 24" deep, 1.71 cu ft..
Both would work. The larger H300 would be my choice if the wall checks out. Getting the rear wall construction for clearances defined is critical to the long term safety of the installation.

https://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/hampton-h200-wood-stove-review.73905/
https://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/newbie-looking-for-advice-on-hampton-h300.55678/
That H300 is nice looking and it appears to be able to go 10" from the rear if I'm reading that correctly. Must research that one. Thanks! Anyone own one?
 

sambucadog

New Member
Jan 6, 2017
20
New Jersey
If clearances are the issue, look at the Summers Heat 2000 ( England Madison / 50-SHSSW01 ). It has awesome clearance specs and puts out decent heat ( 50K Plus BTU). You only need ember / spark protection on the floor, 9 inches from the rear, and 22 on the sides if I remember correctly. I can't seem to break the 6-7 hour mark though even though they claim 8. Could be the underseasoned wood though. So far it's keeping my whole house at 70-75 with it being 15 F outside. I've gotten her up to almost 90 on the first floor though lol.

http://low.es/1FqfIHf

View attachment 192303
View attachment 192304

Sent from my SM-G935T using Tapatalk
Not crazy about the look. but thanks.
 
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