Smoke leaking into home.

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Idahoin

New Member
Nov 27, 2021
6
Idaho
Hello everyone! I have read a lot on here and it has been very helpful. Now I have an issue I need your help with!

I built my tiny house this year and installed a Jotul F602, using Duravent DVL inside and Duravent Duratech outside. The stove I purchased used but the stove pipe is all brand new.

My issue is that I am having a decent amount of smoke coming out of the transition through the wall (photo attached). I have read other threads on this issue and I henge checked over things from those threads. The cap is not clogged, I've inspected all the pipes for clogs, my wood is 15-20% according to my moisture meter, I have run the stove with windows cracked to make sure there was enough air for draft, and I have replaced the adapter in that joint to make sure something wasn't wrong there.

I can not seem to track down what my issue is. It is cold, please help!

20211002_130639.jpg 20211124_142225.jpg
 
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neverstop

Member
Oct 11, 2020
105
new hampshire
Does the horizontal section have a 1/4" rise per foot from that 90 to the tee on the other side? Smoke doesn't like to run downhill or perfectly horizontal.
 

MongoMongoson

Member
Feb 6, 2021
238
Wisconsin
What diameter stove pipe/chimney are you using? It could just be the small stove making your double wall pipe look big, but that looks like 8" pipe and the F602 has something like a 5" flue collar.
 

MongoMongoson

Member
Feb 6, 2021
238
Wisconsin
I just looked at another recent thread with a picture of a 602 with 6" double-wall pipe coming out of the top. I guess you probably have 6" pipe, but wow does it look big on that little stove. You could consider replacing that 90 with two 45s and eliminate the horizontal run altogether.
 

Idahoin

New Member
Nov 27, 2021
6
Idaho
There is a slight rise both inside and outside. It is definitely not going down at all.
I'm using 6" throughout. It is what was recommended.
 

jatoxico

Minister of Fire
Aug 8, 2011
4,366
Long Island NY
Same as above plus what is your total length. May need another section of pipe outside, esp w/ the two 90's.
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
2,871
Long Island NY
are your clearances (back wall) met? And the fire extinguisher above the stove is not the most rational place; if something goes wrong there, how are you going to get to it?
I put mine near the door out of the stove room. So either I can get it when I come in, or it's on my escape path.

I don't know if the install is correct (parts etc), but if it is, then if your draft is not enough, stuff might leak out. With enough draft, it'd suck into the pipe air there.
 

MR. GLO

Member
Jan 26, 2021
248
Massachusetts
Does the horizontal section have a 1/4" rise per foot from that 90 to the tee on the other side? Smoke doesn't like to run downhill or perfectly horizontal.
When does the smoke leak? Near startup or 1 hour after or so?

You could be getting puff back during lighting and wind.

Might have to take it apart and reinstall with stove gasket cement. It's messy and smell but it will seal.
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
2,871
Long Island NY
He says it's from near the thimble. So not a backpuff. Stove cement should not be needed on stove pipe. And it'd break and fall off soon anyway.
 

MR. GLO

Member
Jan 26, 2021
248
Massachusetts
He says it's from near the thimble. So not a backpuff. Stove cement should not be needed on stove pipe. And it'd break and fall off soon anyway.
I have had smoke come out this area during a back puff when I had a 90 into the thimble and don't light fast kindlin fire during wind. I agree but some pipe isn't perfect. Dented etc...

But need more info on when smoke is coming into home...
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
91,319
South Puget Sound, WA
Is the stovepipe attached to the thimble with a Duravent stainless adapter ring? That is supposed to make the seal. If it is then I would try changing the 90º turn to two 45s with an offset in between to eliminate the horizontal section.

two 45s for flue connect.jpg
 
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Idahoin

New Member
Nov 27, 2021
6
Idaho
Same as above plus what is your total length. May need another section of pipe outside, esp w/ the two 90's.
There is 9' of pipe going to outside. Roughly 2.5 feet above my roofline. Is that enough? Should I replace one of the 90's with 2 45's as suggested above?
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
91,319
South Puget Sound, WA
The chimney height is not ideal, but I'd do the 45s with an offset first. That may cure the issue. Connect the top 45 right to the thimble using the stainless Duravent adapter. If draft is still poor it will show up in a lack of secondary combustion.

Also, make sure the tee cap is secure and not leaking air. And the chimney should be braced at 5' above the roofline.
 

Idahoin

New Member
Nov 27, 2021
6
Idaho
are your clearances (back wall) met? And the fire extinguisher above the stove is not the most rational place; if something goes wrong there, how are you going to get to it?
I put mine near the door out of the stove room. So either I can get it when I come in, or it's on my escape path.

I don't know if the install is correct (parts etc), but if it is, then if your draft is not enough, stuff might leak out. With enough draft, it'd suck into the pipe air there.
The clearance is tight. I may be an inch inside 18". I have extra insulation to keep any heat away from the wall.

I see your point haha but the extinguisher upstairs is for loft use. It usually sits further back in the loft. Just in case someone needs to get out of there. I have one on the main level as well.
 

jatoxico

Minister of Fire
Aug 8, 2011
4,366
Long Island NY
Commonly stoves require a minimum of 15' but local differences makes that just a starting point. Many folks here have described night and day difference just by adding another couple feet. You can test with some cheap vent pipe and see how that works. As far as the 45's anything that enhances flow is a good thing.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
91,319
South Puget Sound, WA
Commonly stoves require a minimum of 15' but local differences makes that just a starting point. Many folks here have described night and day difference just by adding another couple feet. You can test with some cheap vent pipe and see how that works. As far as the 45's anything that enhances flow is a good thing.
Yes, the old F602 would work on this setup, but the F602CB asks for 15'. This looks like the F602CB.

@Idahoin, does the stove have a secondary rack inside under the baffle?
 

MR. GLO

Member
Jan 26, 2021
248
Massachusetts
to save you time and money....I wouldn't change or add onto the pipe until your sure it's not operator error. if you add on you will need a support bar. You said the stove was new. So I am assuming you are new to wood stoves.

Most buy a stove then get the firewood. I have made this mistake. Firewood needs to be dry and under 15 percent is the best for me.. two to 3 year and always covered is best.

When did you get the firewood? What moisture readings are you getting?
U have plenty of kindling?
Do you have enough air? Try leaving door cracked.
But it would be nice to know at what point of the burn cycle you saw the smoke come out. and how often.
Are you preheating the flue? Especially if the cabin is cold?
 

Idahoin

New Member
Nov 27, 2021
6
Idaho
Yes, the old F602 would work on this setup, but the F602CB asks for 15'. This looks like the F602CB.

@Idahoin, does the stove have a secondary rack inside under the baffle?
15'! Wow I missed that one. I'll need a lift if that is the case. That's up there! From stove top to vent it is about that.

Here is a photo inside:

16380588980063767353569817858002.jpg
 
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Idahoin

New Member
Nov 27, 2021
6
Idaho
to save you time and money....I wouldn't change or add onto the pipe until your sure it's not operator error. if you add on you will need a support bar. You said the stove was new. So I am assuming you are new to wood stoves.

Most buy a stove then get the firewood. I have made this mistake. Firewood needs to be dry and under 15 percent is the best for me.. two to 3 year and always covered is best.

When did you get the firewood? What moisture readings are you getting?
U have plenty of kindling?
Do you have enough air? Try leaving door cracked.
But it would be nice to know at what point of the burn cycle you saw the smoke come out. and how often.
Are you preheating the flue? Especially if the cabin is cold?
I did make a mistake in not cutting wood much earlier this year! Rookie move. I'll be on that first thing this spring. I have plenty of dead standing trees to get me through. I carry a moisture meter while I'm cutting. I only split pieces 13-19%. That is what I read and I went with it. Maybe a little dryer will help eh?
I'm not a complete novice with wood stoves. I've lived with them before. This one is just being a bugger about smoke.
 

jatoxico

Minister of Fire
Aug 8, 2011
4,366
Long Island NY
15' is total but you have the horizontal and the 90's so you can assume those subtract from that. As BG said the 45's may solve it. I wouldn't buy an expensive section of exterior pipe w/o first testing. The problem with a chimney on the edge is that it will work worse in warmer temps.
 
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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
91,319
South Puget Sound, WA
15'! Wow I missed that one. I'll need a lift if that is the case. That's up there! From stove top to vent it is about that.

Here is a photo inside:
Yes, that is the F602CB.

Take it one step at a time. Switch the interior 90 to the 45s with an offset. Then run it for a few days under different conditions. If the smoke leak is gone then you can focus on the stove performance. A test at that point would be on a calm day to remove the chimney cap, then take a 3 or 4' length of cheap 6" round warm air duct pipe and insert it into the top of the chimney to act as a temporary extension. Run a fire and if there is a notable improvement then start planning for extending the chimney and bracing it. Or consider a stove that will work on a shorter flue system.
 
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moresnow

Minister of Fire
Jan 13, 2015
1,922
Iowa
What elevation is the cabin at?
 
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