Stove Pipe to Wall Clearance - Pipe Manufacturer vs. Stove Manufacturer Requirements

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wjohn

Member
Jul 27, 2021
167
KS
Surely this has been covered on here before somewhere but I was unable to turn it up in a search. Does a stove manufacturer's clearance recommendation supersede that of the pipe manufacturer? Most manufacturers of single wall I see state 18" minimum clearance to combustible materials. I am looking at smaller wood stoves and I am seeing the stove manufacturers list wall clearances to the pipe of less than 18", even for single wall.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
91,301
South Puget Sound, WA
Yes, this has been reported for some Englander stoves. I would still not go below 18" without shielding or better yet, use double-wall connector. What stove is this for?
 

wjohn

Member
Jul 27, 2021
167
KS
This would be for the Aspen C3 (12 3/4" clearance from single wall pipe to vertical walls of structure specified by VC), but I've seen a few other manufacturers also going less than 18".

I guess it makes sense - the stove manufacturer should know what their unit is putting out, whereas the pipe manufacturer probably has to assume you have the worst case stove, so they give you the 18" clearance value for that.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
26,840
central pa
This would be for the Aspen C3 (12 3/4" clearance from single wall pipe to vertical walls of structure specified by VC), but I've seen a few other manufacturers also going less than 18".

I guess it makes sense - the stove manufacturer should know what their unit is putting out, whereas the pipe manufacturer probably has to assume you have the worst case stove, so they give you the 18" clearance value for that.
The stove manufacturer can spec lower pipe clearances it they test them. But as a pro I still won't go under 18 for single wall
 

BCC_Burner

Feeling the Heat
Sep 10, 2013
452
Uptown Marble, CO
The stove manufacturer can spec lower pipe clearances it they test them. But as a pro I still won't go under 18 for single wall


And as a building inspector, I won't pass a stove install with single wall pipe less than 18" from combustibles, regardless of what the stove manufacturer says.
 
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Reactions: begreen and bholler

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
26,840
central pa
And as a building inspector, I won't pass a stove install with single wall pipe less than 18" from combustibles, regardless of what the stove manufacturer says.
It should pass inspection if it meets the stoves specs. I just won't do it as I won't install to minimum clearances either
 

wjohn

Member
Jul 27, 2021
167
KS
Thanks all - I'd say there's consensus here. Much appreciated!
 

BCC_Burner

Feeling the Heat
Sep 10, 2013
452
Uptown Marble, CO
It should pass inspection if it meets the stoves specs. I just won't do it as I won't install to minimum clearances either

In all likelihood, it's perfectly safe installed per the stove specs. The jurisdiction I work for has a strict policy of always going with the greater minimum clearance distance if the stove/fp and venting specs disagree. We also require a pressure test on all fuel burning flues.

There's a backstory that isn't germane to this thread, but it has lead to us taking fuel-burning appliance venting extremely seriously.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
91,301
South Puget Sound, WA
The flue outlet is a couple of inches inboard but still, there's no way I would put a single-wall pipe 10" from a combustible surface. The only way that I would install the Aspen C3 at the listed 8" minimum rear clearance is with heat shielding on spacers on the single wall stove pipe or with a proper, ventilated wall shield for the full length of the stovepipe. Or, simply use the superior double-wall stovepipe.