Tough year drying

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shortys7777

Feeling the Heat
Nov 15, 2017
368
Smithfield, RI
I'm in New England and just loaded up my rack near the house. I had some ash and maple split and stacked top covered since March. Some of my splits are still reading 28-30%. Two years ago I got some maple and cherry under 20% in that time. Looks like I'll have to start the season with some oak that has been stacked a little more than two years that I'm getting 18-20% on most splits. Anyone else notice a slower drying time with this wet summer we had?
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
2,004
Long Island NY
Yes. I've measured some thicker splits of oak that only decreased by 2-4% this year, resulting in 22% now. After three years of being split, stacked, and covered.
 

hickoryhoarder

Minister of Fire
Apr 5, 2013
660
Indiana
Most humid fall in Indiana/Ohio I've ever seen. Some weeks of the summer were also humid.
 
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Ben Stark

Member
Oct 31, 2017
44
Upstate NY
I’m in central New York and two days ago I moved my wood from outside into the garage. There was so much rain this summer i was worried it would rot before it seasoned. I was getting moisture readings of 25 - 30%, when I split a chunk and used my moisture meter. Since moving it inside and putting a fan blowing on it, moisture content has dropped to 20% so I’m hopeful that it will be burnable after a few more weeks under cover.

This is all hard maple, cut and split last winter. It’s seasoned - bark is loose, deep cracks, grayish color, but it’s also wet from a summer of rain and humidity. White mold on the ends of a lot of it. Tossed some splits on a roaring fire last night in my outdoor fire pit and they sizzled with water boiling out the ends. That’s not going to work in my wood stove. Stove likes really dry wood in the range of 15% and under.

I should have just piled it in the garage after splitting it. I’m about ready to give up on seasoning wood outdoors. If anybody has any ideas other then the fan I’d appreciate them. I’ve think I’ll split some down smaller too.
 

aansorge

Minister of Fire
Aug 12, 2011
957
Southern Minnesota
I probably had one of the best summers for drying I've ever had. The farmers had a very dry summer to deal with other than 3 days of intense rain.
 
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Woody5506

Minister of Fire
Feb 14, 2017
882
Rochester NY
Not sure what kind of plan you're on but if you're 3 years ahead which I know sounds crazy to some, you really don't even have to wonder if the wood is dry enough.
 
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stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
2,004
Long Island NY
I'd still check the mc. As an example, I'm having some oak that was split and stacked covered in the February of 2019. I.e it has seen 3 summers. The bigger pieces are still 22% or so.

Of course this depends on local climate.
 

peakbagger

Minister of Fire
Jul 11, 2008
6,625
Northern NH
My county in Northern Nh was in drought conditions most of the year. Great year for drying especially with my plastic covered "kiln"
 
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Grizzerbear

Minister of Fire
Feb 12, 2019
1,177
SW Missoura
We started off with pretty cool temps this summer and normal humidity. The last half of summer was very hot compared to normal and the humidity was abnormally low from what we are used to. All in all I think the seasoning conditions were pretty favorable though I've yet to put the meter to any pieces to know for aure.
 
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clancey

Minister of Fire
Feb 26, 2021
1,751
Colorado
We were so dry we had forest fires...But wet weather-lots of it I believe is coming in -not sure but I think I heard that on the weather report...clancey
 

gthomas785

Minister of Fire
Feb 8, 2020
530
Central MA
I've had some ash stacked for a few years and I'm pretty sure the moisture content increased over the summer. Brought a few splits in a week ago and I could feel it was damp. It wouldn't burn. This had been fully top covered.
Stored a bunch of that wood inside for the past week with the mini split blowing on it, it burns better now.
 
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stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
2,004
Long Island NY
I measured some pine that I split and stacked in spring. 17-18%.
And not terribly small; 5" splits or so.

So that *did* work well...
 

old greybeard

Member
Oct 29, 2018
79
PA
Glad to see this thread. Was confused by my readings. Went to burn year old hemlock 22% or so, then checked my 18 month old pile of oak, it was high. We’re in northern PA and its been 65% humidity inside for months. Fighting mold in sheds and outhouses. Tons of rain.
Ready for cold weather and dry air.
 

Ctwoodtick

Minister of Fire
Jun 5, 2015
1,579
Southeast CT
It’s been wet in New England. If your only wood is in the 20’s, burn it and check the chimney more frequently.
 

shortys7777

Feeling the Heat
Nov 15, 2017
368
Smithfield, RI
I will be burning whatever dry stuff I have and keeping the fires hot. I may bring in a couple weeks worth and stack it in the basement which stays dry. I'm 2 years ahead hoping to get a wood shed built next which will allow me to get 3 years up by keeping more out back stacked and top covered.
 

MEngineer24

Member
Dec 6, 2020
109
WV
Had a great drying summer here. Above average heat from June-current date. The south facing wood shed really performed great! I put some green cherry in there end of this March and it’s sub 20%. All other hardwoods I cut early last year. I haven’t probed the oak yet but I suspect it isn’t ready yet.
 

PaulBunyun

Member
Oct 15, 2019
44
Michigan
Very wet summer in MI this year. I have readings at around 20% about a month and a half ago. Hoping it has dropped a couple % since then.
 

Ben Stark

Member
Oct 31, 2017
44
Upstate NY
An update to my post last month, after being in the garage for about a month, the wood really dried out well. I’ve been burning for the last couple days and no worries at all. Now getting moisture measurements of 18-19.5% on my larger splits. Have to keep the air control open a little longer after reloading. Probably just stack right into the garage next year it stays cleaner and dried and always seasons well. (I’m lucky my garage is well ventilated lol) Outside is dicey - too much rain.

Thought about building a wood shed - but the garage is attached to the house so it makes going out for wood a pleasure.
 

Dix

Minister of Fire
May 27, 2008
6,441
Long Island, NY
Same local as the OP.

Yes, a difference in seasoning this year. I top cover,

Just got delivered a load of seasoned (yes, it is. It's in the PE right now and burning wonderfully) from my firewood guy, for insurance.
 
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thewoodlands

Minister of Fire
Aug 25, 2009
14,039
Foothills of The Adirondacks
Same local as the OP.

Yes, a difference in seasoning this year. I top cover,

Just got delivered a load of seasoned (yes, it is. It's in the PE right now and burning wonderfully) from my firewood guy, for insurance.
We had a very dry spring and summer in northern new york but when the rains came in the fall, we received our fair share.

I top cover so our shoulder season wood (pine) after being inside for three days had readings of 8,10 & 12 percent. Our hardwood that came in measured between 10 - 18 percent after being in three days.

The pine was stacked for just over a year and the hardwood we'll be burning first was c/s/s two plus years.
 
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Ben Stark

Member
Oct 31, 2017
44
Upstate NY
Bought a couple days worth inside the house and the dry air really finishing the job hardwood down to 15-16%. My stove is an Osborn 1600 insert and that’s it’s sweet spot. Actually too warm today let it go out and I’ll do a good ash clean out - leave about an inch, and clean the glass. I’m going to focus on scavenging some wood the next few days, getting next years pile started. Wish I had the time/money to get two years ahead… maybe when I retire lol.
 

Jay106n

Minister of Fire
Apr 1, 2015
786
Litchfield County, CT
Same here in CT. It was a very rainy spring/summer.
 

trucklyhow

New Member
Oct 1, 2021
7
Pelham, MA
After a few lovely days here the monsoon seems to have returned. Despairing of getting wood to dry in this swamp. Maybe this is a dumb question: if I have split, stacked, top covered cordwood and it isn't rotten/punky, is it possible for moisture content to actually go up?
 

Caw

Minister of Fire
May 26, 2020
1,032
Massachusetts
As everyone here has reported we had an extremely wet year in New England. Our local reserviors are all maxed out and I haven't been able to mow my front yard in months. That being said I still got some great wood drying. I split it all on the smaller wide ans have it stacked facing west in my open back yard so it gets pounded with the afternoon sun and prevailing winds. Location/orientation really matter when it comes to drying.
 

Ctwoodtick

Minister of Fire
Jun 5, 2015
1,579
Southeast CT
After a few lovely days here the monsoon seems to have returned. Despairing of getting wood to dry in this swamp. Maybe this is a dumb question: if I have split, stacked, top covered cordwood and it isn't rotten/punky, is it possible for moisture content to actually go up?
I don’t think moisture will go up much if at all. My best guess is that drying will slow with the cooler months. But yes, this year has been wet wet wet.
 
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