Truck tire specs - the finer points

Ashful Posted By Ashful, Mar 11, 2019 at 9:47 PM

  1. Ashful

    Ashful
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    Time to replace the tires on my wood hauler / trailer tower / family road wagon / bad weather commuter, and I want to switch from the standard OEM M+S road tires to an A/T type tire. I understand all of the basics, 275/60R20 114S, load range / ply rating, etc. No need for help, there.

    But the one that has me tripped up is the load rating. The OEM tires are marked 2601 lb. @ 44 psi, but they're also marked "STANDARD LOAD", which seems to be a contradiction. Standard Load, or "SL" tires are to be rated at a max 35 psi, if I believe Al Gore's Interweb. Yet here they are, on my truck... "Standard Load" tires rated for max load at 44 psi.

    The door sticker has inflation listed at 39 psi, so a tire rated for max load at 35 psi seems a poor choice, for this vehicle. What am I missing, folks?
     
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  2. Ashful

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    I should add... in past trucks I've just stepped up from the 4-ply passenger BS to an 8-ply or 10-ply LT tire. They handle a lot better under load, which is great, but they're not without their disadvantages for daily around town or road trip use. I've never really had an issue running 4-ply, and like the lower rotational weight, even if they look a little scary under load.
     
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  3. Rock Crusher

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    worktruckonline.com kind of explains it. Seems some SL tires are designed to be able to run higher than 35 psi for certain performance characteristics per the article.
     
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  4. bholler

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    With the weight you tow I would be running load range e if I were you. The downside is they don't ride very nice when not loaded. That is why I really only use my 1 ton for hauling.
     
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  5. Ashful

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    Thanks! That was a very good article. I honestly was wondering where it was headed, until the last paragraph, which was a direct answer to my question.
    Yeah, that's what I always figured in the past, and the ride quality hit never really bothered me much. Truly, I should have a 3/4 ton, but my need for that capacity is just too infrequent.

    Here's how I see it, unless I'm missing something big.

    LT advantages:
    Better handling with heavy loads
    More durable off-road

    P-Metric advantages:
    $400 less per set
    Better acceleration
    Better gas mileage (meh)
    Better handling unloaded
    Better ride
    Still meets the requirement (if rated 114 or higher)

    Since my heavy hauls all tend to be < 10 miles (local, mostly hauling wood), and I'm not anxious to give up any acceleration or the extra $400, I'm kinda leaning toward the P-metrics. Tell me I'm crazy!

    BTW... ever since I got the tandem axle trailer, all heavy loads tend to go on that. That can still make the truck squat pretty hard, but nothing like the old days, when I was putting a half cord of fresh cut oak in the bed. I was running 10 ply tires on my old truck, back then.
     
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  6. Ashful

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    I found this LT tire, which I like in all regards. But it's 25% heavier and $300+ more than any of the P-Metrics that I was considering:

    BFGOODRICH ALL-TERRAIN T/A KO2LT275/60R-20
    • Part Number: 64811
    • Service Description: 119 S Speed Rating: S = 112 mph
    • Load Range: D (8 Ply)
    • Treadlife Warranty: 50000 miles
    • Type: Light Truck All Season All Terrain
    $963.96 Set of 4

    _10770.jpg
     
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  7. Bad LP

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    Look at the Toyo Open Country A/T2. Slightly more money at 269.10 that I paid on 11-9-19 but a tougher tire IMO. I'm on at least my 5th set over various 3/4 ton trucks. Empty I run them at 40 in the rear and 42-44 up front. If I'm going to tow or carry any real weight I'll add air accordingly.
     
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  8. SpaceBus

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    You can't go wrong with the BFG, but what are your goals for the tire? Do you need snow traction, dry traction, mud, sand, etc? Do you usually carry a lot of weight? You might be over thinking the tire pressure thing, that all depends on what you do with this truck.
     
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  9. tadmaz

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    I recently got General AT/X's LT (load range E, 10-ply) for $700. 245/70/17. No more expensive than P tires. Super awesome tires, I run at 65 psi with no weight, 75psi if the bed is full of firewood.
     
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  10. blades

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    Be aware that E rated tires are now a double standard- plies are now rated at equivalent which means they are not 10 ply might be only 4(as an example) there are also 2 E ratings just to muck things up further. Going to be a real pia in a couple years to find true 10 ply tires. I use my trucks as trucks that means pounding in the field & woods where all manor of nasty tire abusing items appear mostly at inappropriate times. Right now on my little chase around unit - the door sticker says 36 lbs air- tires are marked 55 psi max . at 50 psi I can attain apx 30 mpg- at 36 psi maybe 25-
     
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  11. Ashful

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    Hey blades, that 10 ply “rating” thing is nothing new, I think. I had that explained to me almost 20 years ago, when shopping my first pair of Toyo M410’s.

    Will definitely check out the two models you guys recommended, but those BFG TA AT K02’s have quite a following, they seem to have hit the sweet spot for a lot of guys wanting to go a little heavier than P-metric, but staying shy of the weight of a full 10-ply tire.

    As to what I use this truck for (SpaceBus), it’s too varied to have one “ideal” tire. In rough order of frequency / mileage:

    1. Bad weather commuting to work, days when I don’t want to get the sedan messy. Around here, that means lots of nuisance snows, and semi-frequent ice.
    2. Moving building materials for my endless DIY projects.
    3. Hauling boat trailers to the lake or the shore.
    4. Hauling my heavy firewood trailer (7000 lb. with too much tongue weight, thanks to a winch and batteries).
    5. Family trips.
    6. Airport parking and trips into the city.

    It’s item 4, the firewood task, that has me taking this truck off road. But I’ve never had an issue with the P-metric OEM tires, I’m not exactly racing in Baja, just crawling thru fields. I need some traction when I get into soft ground or slippery grass with a loaded trailer, hence the AT type treads, but I’m not mud bogging.
     
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  12. Kevin Weis

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    That's what I got on my 13' Tachoma. Got tired of getting stuck on semi-compacted slush which we seem to get a lot of around these parts. Gas mileage suffers though.
     
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  13. SpaceBus

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    I think go with the BFGs and air up when you have a lot of weight. At 35psi it should still still steer and drive like stock, but those tires will be louder and as you mentioned heavier. If you've got some coin check out the Bridgestone Dueler AT, it's going to be more like the stock tires as far as volume, and not quite as aggressive of a tread pattern. People seem to like the new Yokohama AT and I'm using their Dually MT on my truck and couldn't be happier.
     
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  14. bholler

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    I have had a few sets of yokohamas and i was happy with them. They used to be cheaper now the price has krept up to match most other decent brands. I have been happy all of the generals and coopers i have had. Really the only dissapointments have been goodyears.
     
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  15. SpaceBus

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    Cooper makes some really great tires, especially truck tires. Somehow Goodyear has managed to not make a single product I would recommend to anyone. Unfortunately there are like two or three Dually MT tires, so my options were limited. The Yokohamas have been amazing in all of this snow and even pretty good on the ice. My wife's 185/45/15 winter tires are louder than the six 235/80/17 MTs on my truck. There's a tire for every purpose, but you have to search through every brand to find the right one for your own needs.
     
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  16. Ashful

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    Gas mileage is a zero concern for me. Zero. But the impact of 25% more rotational mass is huge, in terms of acceleration, handling, and even brake wear. This is the on thing that has me debating between an XL load rated P-Metric and the LT load range D.

    The funny thing is that it appears the XL P-Metric is actually rated to carry more load at what would be my typical running inflation. The LT's can carry more, if I'm afforded the effort and foresight to air-up prior to loading it, but sometimes I don't have the luxury of planning ahead, nor do I always know how much air I should really add for a given job.
     
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  17. SpaceBus

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    Then go with a the highest load rating tire that gives the traction you want.
     
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  18. Bad LP

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    LT tires are also built tougher than P tires resulting in better resistance to tread and sidewall damage. For many of the woods roads I travel for pleasure this is important.
     
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  19. sloeffle

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    No Michelin fans ?

    I have the Michelin LTX AT/2 on my 2500HD and they seem to be a good tire. I'd say they'll go to about 50k before they need to be replaced. They are an E rated tire. It looks like the same Michelin tire for your truck would be an S rated tire though.
     
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  20. Renovationman

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    I have these Michelins LT’s and currently have 141,000 kilometres on them. I checked in the fall and they have 7-8 mm of tread left. I have rotated them every spring as I tow a 26’ camper. I will be replacing them in the spring with same tires.
     
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  21. Ashful

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    Actually, if you read the stat’s, Michelin has the highest OE loyalty rate of any brand. By that, I mean that more people who buy a car with Michelin tires as the OE brand, replace them with Michelin tires, than any other brand. I think that number is about 33% for Michelin, with the second highest being at least 10 points down, in the mid 20%’s.

    But brand loyalty among tires has never made much sense, to me. Brands and models change so frequently and rapidly, and there is so much incest in the manufacturing process (one factory turning out 20 brands), that I can’t really understand why anyone would feel any loyalty to any brand, for commodity-level tires.

    Get into specialized stuff (Mickey Thompson ET’s, Pirelli PZero Nero, etc.), and I can understand the brand loyalty, but not for AT type pickup truck tires.
     
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  22. Bad LP

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    The Michelin's that came on the truck in August when I bought it are great for dry roads and no mud. They were promptly removed in Nov for the winter. Absolutely worthless tires otherwise. I'll burn them down this summer then put the Toyo's back on. After that it will be one more set of tires before I replace the truck again.
     
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  23. festerw

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    If you don't need them immediately, Discount Tire runs ebay sales $100 off over $400 from time to time. I did two orders and picked up a set of 4 Michelin Defender LTX for about $650.
     
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  24. sloeffle

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    My dad worked all over the world installing X-ray machines that X-ray tires for defects. I can remember as a kid him taking me to his shop and they had a machine they built that X-ray'd earth moving tires. I saw the picture awhile ago, and I wasn't even as tall as the sidewall on the tires. When I was 16 my dad went to Japan for a month and China for five months. He said the quality at that time on the Chinese tires was horrible. I'd assume over time it has gotten better. He said by far, Michelin and Bridgestone were the highest quality tires made tires during that time. This was the late 90's and early 2000's. They are also the most expensive it seems like. To this day he will only run Michelin tires on his vehicles. All three of my vehicles have Michelin or Bridgestone too. Once the OE tires wear out on the car with Bridgestone's, that car will get a set of Michelin's. You can usually get a pretty good deal through Costco on both brands.
     
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  25. sloeffle

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    I couldn't agree with you more. The Michelin's on my truck are horrible in the mud.
     
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