Updating old auger motors designed for 115 Volt AC to 120 VAC

  • Active since 1995, Hearth.com is THE place on the internet for free information and advice about wood stoves, pellet stoves and other energy saving equipment.

    We strive to provide opinions, articles, discussions and history related to Hearth Products and in a more general sense, energy issues.

    We promote the EFFICIENT, RESPONSIBLE, CLEAN and SAFE use of all fuels, whether renewable or fossil.

Don2222

Minister of Fire
Feb 1, 2010
8,875
Salem NH
Hello
I just updated 4 auger motors in an Englander 25-PDV and 25-PDVC that were 10 years old and warn out. The top auger in the 25-PDVC had a bad auger motor, a frozen auger bearing, a cracked vacuum hose and a bad PU-VS vacuum switch. That looks like a few reasons the pellets were not feeding. LOL
Anyway the outlet voltage measured where the stoves were plugged in is 125 VAC.
The rated voltage stamped on the old auger motor for best performance was 115 VAC to suit the older voltages of 110, 115 and 117 in many parts of the country.
Nowadays the standard is 120 VAC so motor design has been changed and updated and rated for 120 VAC.
Considering these facts and the 125 VAC measured on the outlet to supply these stoves, these new motors with more magnetic plates and almost double the current draw, should work better and last longer.
Has anyone else measured their outlets and check their auger motor ratings?
See pics below
From the following link under standardazation
The Latest VAC standard in USA & CA
In the United States[13][14] and Canada,[15] national standards specify that the nominal voltage at the source should be 120 V and allow a range of 114 V to 126 V (RMS) (−5% to +5%). Historically 110 V, 115 V and 117 V have been used at different times and places in North America. Mains power is sometimes spoken of as 110 V; however, 120 V is the nominal voltage.
Pic 1 - 10 year old auger motor
Pic 2 - Brand new auger motor
 

Attachments

  • 7BB96CE7-44CD-4533-B89D-8780B9C8A7CC.jpeg
    7BB96CE7-44CD-4533-B89D-8780B9C8A7CC.jpeg
    152 KB · Views: 96
  • BDF86565-75E4-4412-9F92-62B7590BF6A5.jpeg
    BDF86565-75E4-4412-9F92-62B7590BF6A5.jpeg
    129.7 KB · Views: 94
  • Like
Reactions: vinny11950

Nitro-Fish

Burning Hunk
Feb 5, 2009
164
VA
Not critical, no need to update motors difference of .01 amps @120V & .03 amps @ 125V.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: FirepotPete

Nitro-Fish

Burning Hunk
Feb 5, 2009
164
VA
Also the motor in your 2nd picture is not labeled correctly if it truly is a 72 amp motor you would never run it from a regular residential outlet.
 

MalcolmH

Burning Hunk
Jan 22, 2017
104
Ontario
if your worried about the voltage source a Battery uninterrupted will give you 120V consistently and safely, but your splitting hairs concerning yourself with motor voltage requirements, they will take what ever voltage range you mentioned and run as they should.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Don2222

Don2222

Minister of Fire
Feb 1, 2010
8,875
Salem NH
Also the motor in your 2nd picture is not labeled correctly if it truly is a 72 amp motor you would never run it from a regular residential outlet.
Yes, it is 0.72 Amps LOL
 

zrock

Minister of Fire
Dec 2, 2017
1,239
bc
Household voltage can range anywhere from 115 to 125 volts give or take depending on the load in your neighborhood.. Their is usually a slight drop when you are in peak times when people are getting off from work or in the mornings... The slight voltage diffrence on thos motors is nothing to worry about
 
  • Like
Reactions: tbear853

tbear853

Feeling the Heat
I grew up hearing Dad refer to it as 110, but where I live now I measure 120 … replaced auger motor in 1996. I knew there was tolerance built in.

That 60 hertz is important too.