Vermont Castings creosote

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Ergivens

New Member
Feb 11, 2022
5
Millinocket
I have a new Vermont Castings Encore and this it's first heating season. I had my chimney swept in mid-November. For about a month I have had problems with the stove smoking, so I the chimney swept again a couple of days ago. There was considerable creosote buildup, with several large chunks about a quarter to half inch thick at the top of the chimney which had broken loose which I suspect is what was causing the smoking. I have been burning wood with an old cook range for about 45 years with this same chimney and have never had creosote like this. It was my sole source of heat.
When the weather is cold I can run the stove hot enough with the damper closed so that the secondary burn is functioning and to keep it from smoking and hopefully avoid creosote buildup. When the the weather is warmer, and especially with sunshine, the house gets much too hot. I still need a fire and have been running the stove with one or two pieces of wood in the stove with the draft closed and the damper open. Would this mode of operation cause creosote buildup? My wood has been seasoned for two years.
 

kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
6,541
07462
Wood is to wet, or you have a serious problem with the chimney rapidly cooling, the old cook stove didnt have efficiency as high as the new stove, meaning the new stove transfers more heat from a load of wood into the room then the cook stove when loading the same amount of wood in the fire box reducing chimney temps and then compound that with a chimney that rapidly cools due to the environment you could have flue gases condensing and forming creosote, but again, its usually more of a wet wood situation more then the rapidly cooling chimney.
 

Ergivens

New Member
Feb 11, 2022
5
Millinocket
Wood is to wet, or you have a serious problem with the chimney rapidly cooling, the old cook stove didnt have efficiency as high as the new stove, meaning the new stove transfers more heat from a load of wood into the room then the cook stove when loading the same amount of wood in the fire box reducing chimney temps and then compound that with a chimney that rapidly cools due to the environment you could have flue gases condensing and forming creosote, but again, its usually more of a wet wood situation more then the rapidly cooling chimney.
My wood is not wet, it has been seasoning for two years. My flue temperature may be too cool due to masonry chimney. My main question is, can I run the stove with a very low fire with only one piece of wood in the firebox with the draft closed and the damper open? Will operating it in this manner create creosote? Chimney sweep man thought relining the chimney with a ss liner might reduce heat transfer. House is two story with attic.
 

Ergivens

New Member
Feb 11, 2022
5
Millinocket
Wood is to wet, or you have a serious problem with the chimney rapidly cooling, the old cook stove didnt have efficiency as high as the new stove, meaning the new stove transfers more heat from a load of wood into the room then the cook stove when loading the same amount of wood in the fire box reducing chimney temps and then compound that with a chimney that rapidly cools due to the environment you could have flue gases condensing and forming creosote, but again, its usually more of a wet wood situation more then the rapidly cooling chimney.
I am not using the cat.
 

pen

There are some who call me...mod.
Staff member
Aug 2, 2007
7,965
N.E. Penna
SS insulated liner will certainly help. If it stays warm to the sky, it doesn't have the chance to form creosote. However, draft closed means very limited air with a small fire, and I'm afraid with that, even good wood will build creosote. Gotta have enough air to burn cleanly. Will be better off letting the stove go out, and building small hot fires. It's a pain, but will be safer.
 

BigJ273

Minister of Fire
Feb 15, 2015
519
Maryland
Of course an insulated liner will help. That’s the point of it. To keep the temps high until it exits so creosote doesn’t form. And low smoldering fires def contribute to creosote as well.
 

Bad LP

Minister of Fire
Nov 28, 2014
2,001
Northern Maine
Run a small hot fire, when it gets to coals shut it way down.
 

Ergivens

New Member
Feb 11, 2022
5
Millinocket
Run a small hot fire, when it gets to coals shut it way down.
I think I'll try that. With a small amount of wood, I will wait until the stove top thermometer reaches the top of the white area marked safe operation (about 475) and then close the bypass damper. I was probably closing the damper before the stove got hot enough.
 
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