What would be your choice of "lightweight" rear handle saw?

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clancey

Minister of Fire
Feb 26, 2021
1,398
Colorado
You all make some wonderful points but I do need to make it easier on myself and I am checking into those saw dust bricks because the little that I would burn the rest of the expenses at this time would just not be worth it at this point in my life. But all these wonderful suggestions are great with the knowledge that they give me for at least I know that wood can be split with the proper tools and which ones to use..When I go out to lunch "someday" with my girlfriend that fireplace place that sells stuff will be a new adventure for me..I do need a certain amount of stuff that I would like to have like some gauges for moisture and temperature on the stove pipe. For a start I am going to get 1/4 cord of wood and "play with it" as well as asking them to cut it shorter for me to put in the little shed. I plan on about 17 inch length because my stove takes 18 inches and I do not want to cram it in too tight and then split those as I learn and get more confident to do this as the wood gets drier and drier but in the beginning I am going to check into those sawdust bricks just to make it easier on myself and not have to "go industrial" at this time...What I need is to airmail one of you lumberjacks here to cut wood for whole seasons for me--lol lol.. thanks everyone so much for all your help, encouragement and knowledge...clancey
 

salecker

Minister of Fire
Aug 22, 2010
1,476
Northern Canada
I just bought a Stihl MS150 from a Lady who had it since new.
She replaced it with a cordless Stihl.
She likes the cordless one more,starting the MS150 could be troublesome,but as she found out on the trail the cordless ones are useless if you forget to charge the battery.
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
6,118
Downeast Maine
I just bought a Stihl MS150 from a Lady who had it since new.
She replaced it with a cordless Stihl.
She likes the cordless one more,starting the MS150 could be troublesome,but as she found out on the trail the cordless ones are useless if you forget to charge the battery.
The MS150 is hard starting? Sounds like a tuning issue. Mine starts very easily.
 

jetsam

Minister of Fire
Dec 12, 2015
5,283
Long Island, NY
youtu.be
I actually haven't found any electric saws comparable to the two gas saws I listed. The electric saws are usually more powerful, well have more torque, but weigh more. The gas saws also get lighter after use, which is nice.

I see the same thing on the spec sheets but I don't believe it... I have used the 9A Homelite electric saw and it is very light. It is listed at 9.5# including the box and packaging and little bottle of bar oil that it comes with. The Echo (which is a purpose-designed climbing saw) is listed on Echo's spec sheets at 5.2# for the powerhead... which excludes fluids and maybe the bar and chain?

I think you'd have to weigh both to compare them fairly since neither number is a powerhead weight. Though may turn out to be moot because not many people will shell out $400 for a pro climbing saw when they want to cut up some branches in their back yard. ;)
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
6,118
Downeast Maine
I see the same thing on the spec sheets but I don't believe it... I have used the 9A Homelite electric saw and it is very light. It is listed at 9.5# including the box and packaging and little bottle of bar oil that it comes with. The Echo (which is a purpose-designed climbing saw) is listed on Echo's spec sheets at 5.2# for the powerhead... which excludes fluids and maybe the bar and chain?

I think you'd have to weigh both to compare them fairly since neither number is a powerhead weight. Though may turn out to be moot because not many people will shell out $400 for a pro climbing saw when they want to cut up some branches in their back yard. ;)
If you are talking corded electric saws, I will agree, they are as light or lighter. Battery saws are another story.
 

salecker

Minister of Fire
Aug 22, 2010
1,476
Northern Canada

salecker

Minister of Fire
Aug 22, 2010
1,476
Northern Canada
I see the same thing on the spec sheets but I don't believe it... I have used the 9A Homelite electric saw and it is very light. It is listed at 9.5# including the box and packaging and little bottle of bar oil that it comes with. The Echo (which is a purpose-designed climbing saw) is listed on Echo's spec sheets at 5.2# for the powerhead... which excludes fluids and maybe the bar and chain?

I think you'd have to weigh both to compare them fairly since neither number is a powerhead weight. Though may turn out to be moot because not many people will shell out $400 for a pro climbing saw when they want to cut up some branches in their back yard. ;)
$400 for a pro climbing saw...
Let me know what you can get for those prices please.
Or are you talking used? Which is still cheap for a MS 200 or 201
 

jetsam

Minister of Fire
Dec 12, 2015
5,283
Long Island, NY
youtu.be
$400 for a pro climbing saw...
Let me know what you can get for those prices please.
Or are you talking used? Which is still cheap for a MS 200 or 201

We were specifically nattering about the CS2511T, I think. It runs about $400. I know some people will complain when you say "echo" and "pro" in the same breath, but top handle climbing saws are not for the homeowner market. Almost every saw sold is to a tree climber.
 

jetsam

Minister of Fire
Dec 12, 2015
5,283
Long Island, NY
youtu.be
If you are talking corded electric saws, I will agree, they are as light or lighter. Battery saws are another story.

I have still never tried a battery saw. I would probably buy one of the AEG saws today if they were sold in the US, though, as I already have the batteries and chargers. It might even be able to take over a lot of the stuff my little 30cc Echo does.

The corded ones are real light. (Also all plastic.)
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
6,118
Downeast Maine
We were specifically nattering about the CS2511T, I think. It runs about $400. I know some people will complain when you say "echo" and "pro" in the same breath, but top handle climbing saws are not for the homeowner market. Almost every saw sold is to a tree climber.
I would probably take that Echo over the MS151 if I were buying a new top handle saw. The Stihl is nice, but I think the extra $100 (and allegedly another 1/2lb) is buying the name.
 

salecker

Minister of Fire
Aug 22, 2010
1,476
Northern Canada
We were specifically nattering about the CS2511T, I think. It runs about $400. I know some people will complain when you say "echo" and "pro" in the same breath, but top handle climbing saws are not for the homeowner market. Almost every saw sold is to a tree climber.
Stihl makes clamshell top handles with are not pro saws
is the CS2511 a saw you can remove the cylinder without dissembling the complete saw?
I think that is the differential between a pro saw and the rest
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
6,118
Downeast Maine
Stihl makes clamshell top handles with are not pro saws
is the CS2511 a saw you can remove the cylinder without dissembling the complete saw?
I think that is the differential between a pro saw and the rest
The Stihl MS151 TC-E (and my 150 version) are pro saws, even though they are clamshell saws. All top handle saws are pro saws according to the saw manufacturers. The Echo CS2511 is a favorite among those that port saws and use them for a living.
 

salecker

Minister of Fire
Aug 22, 2010
1,476
Northern Canada
Spacebus sorry to be busting your chops all the time...
The Stihl MS150 is a pro saw that is the smallest pro saw in production.
And it is not a clamshell type saw.
A clamshell saw means you have to take the complete saw apart to remove the cylinder
The MS150 has a removable cylinder.
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
6,118
Downeast Maine

salecker

Minister of Fire
Aug 22, 2010
1,476
Northern Canada
Sorry you are the one spreading misinformation,which is done quite frequently by those that don't know everything.Try looking at your saw,or maybe take it apart and clean it so you can see for yourself.
Here is the IPL for a MS150 cylinder and you can see it is not a clamshell but a real pro saw with a removable cylinder stihl ms150.gif .
 

salecker

Minister of Fire
Aug 22, 2010
1,476
Northern Canada
Nomenclature aside, I don't think anyone who wants a tiny saw for occasional use is going to be looking for one that costs more than a used car, and whose parts all cost more than an entire new Homelite saw.
I bought a mint MS150 for $250.00 because i wanted the smallest pro saw built.But like you said they are expensive new.A lady bought this one new in 2016.
I have picked lot's of small saws for nothing.Usually takes minor work to get them running,easy flips.Everyone is looking small cheap saws.
If you take any of the elcheapo small saws and do a little work to them they will do what they were designed to do for a long time. I sold a 30 some cc poulan to a guy 4 years ago and he still uses it to cut his firewood.Muff mod,timing advance re-tune is what gets done to all saws i sell.
 

SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
6,118
Downeast Maine
Sorry you are the one spreading misinformation,which is done quite frequently by those that don't know everything.Try looking at your saw,or maybe take it apart and clean it so you can see for yourself.
Here is the IPL for a MS150 cylinder and you can see it is not a clamshell but a real pro saw with a removable cylinder View attachment 278829 .
Take up the argument with Stihl, who clearly define the saw as a professional climbing saw. I'm not spreading misinformation, you are hung up on nomenclature that I did not decide. Fight Stihl, not me.
 

mar13

Feeling the Heat
Nov 5, 2018
447
California redwood coast
Last year I bought a Makita battery powered saw (2 x 18v batteries) as I was already getting a few other of their 18v powered tools. It's not nearly as powerful as my Stihl 026, but I often go for the Makita when I only have a few cuts or working with the smaller cuts needed around the yard. It's just so convenient, quiet, effortless start/stop, and in general easy to use. If I only needed a saw for simple yard work, I'd definitely go battery, but for firewood processing, definitely gas.
 
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SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
6,118
Downeast Maine
Last year I bought a Makita battery powered saw (2 x 18v batteries) as I was already getting a few other of their 18v powered tools. It's not nearly as powerful as my Stihl 026, but I often go for the Makita when I only have a few cuts or working with the smaller cuts needed around the yard. It's just so convenient, quiet, effortless start/stop, and in general easy to use. If I only needed a saw for simple yard work, I'd definitely go battery, but for firewood processing, definitely gas.
I think about getting a Dewalt electric saw since I have a pile of the 20v and 60v batteries. Especially for use when I'm running the wood shredder and need to quickly resize something. My Stihl MS150t works well enough since it starts so easily, but there are times where I wish it were a battery saw.
 
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jetsam

Minister of Fire
Dec 12, 2015
5,283
Long Island, NY
youtu.be
I think about getting a Dewalt electric saw since I have a pile of the 20v and 60v batteries. Especially for use when I'm running the wood shredder and need to quickly resize something. My Stihl MS150t works well enough since it starts so easily, but there are times where I wish it were a battery saw.

Our fire department uses the flexvolt sawzalls and grinders for fire rescue. They really like them.

Not sure if they have the chainsaw or not. Getting carbide chains may be iffy in those weird little chain sizes?

I've been on the lookout for a battery saw that I already have batteries for (or can adapt over to), but either price or push-oiler single-stud-bar crappiness has scared me off of every candidate on the market right now. The strongest contenders are AEG's 18v AEG-branded saw and TTI's 18v Milwaukee-branded 16" one, I guess. They both have automatic (nonadjustable) oilers and two bar studs, at least.

If I was already on the flexvolt battery platform, I'd be looking hard at their stuff.
 
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SpaceBus

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2018
6,118
Downeast Maine
Our fire department uses the flexvolt sawzalls and grinders for fire rescue. They really like them.

Not sure if they have the chainsaw or not. Getting carbide chains may be iffy in those weird little chain sizes?

I've been on the lookout for a battery saw that I already have batteries for (or can adapt over to), but either price or push-oiler single-stud-bar crappiness has scared me off of every candidate on the market right now. The strongest contenders are AEG's 18v AEG-branded saw and TTI's 18v Milwaukee-branded 16" one, I guess. They both have automatic (nonadjustable) oilers and two bar studs, at least.

If I was already on the flexvolt battery platform, I'd be looking hard at their stuff.

I have the same things holding me back, plus it would be hard to justify another saw when I have three working ones and one dead one!
 

EbS-P

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2019
1,204
SE North Carolina
I have an ego battery leaf blower and just yesterday almost bought an ego chain saw for 100$ on eBay. I decided not too after thinking how convenience will probably mean I will use it more often without appropriate PPE. “Oh I just have these two little limbs let me get the battery saw out real quick”. Leaving all the PPE behind because before I’d just grab the hand saw. Not to mention the chain gauge was different than my other 3/8 LP saw. You still have top up the bar oil cause you know it leaked all out since the last quick job. So the only difference is some two cycle gas.
My argument is totally different if I/you/someone else doesn’t have any other 2 cycle equipment. Battery all the way baby.
I am going to buy a half decent hand pruning saw and stop looking at battery chainsaws. Now battery reciprocal
saws for little jobs are great. That's what I use if a piece of firewood is too long.

Evan
 
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