Why do soo many people heat these new epa wood burning stoves.

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Itslay90

Feeling the Heat
Dec 16, 2022
417
Upstate,NY
1. You burn less wood,

2. It helps you understand that your wood needs to be dry, and you can’t be burning wet wood in them.

3. Plus it saves you time and money
 
Those who dislike are most likely used to the forgiving stoves of moisture content.
The new stoves can be a bit fussy to those not used to them.
New stoves are more expensive.
They require work ahead, as to the wood supply.
Those who buy their wood, by the split cord, have to be aware of the "seasoned" wood they are buying.

These are the top reasons that come to mind. I'm wanting a BK Ashford 30 for the house, and relocate my beloved Moe to the shop. Shop isn't built yet ..... LOL.
 
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I don’t have the most up to date or efficient insert out there, 10 yrs old. I know it’s not very cold yet, but I have been getting a good few hours of good heat from half a load of river birch.(low btu wood). I have never run a pre epa stove but I think my results are pretty good.
 
Even with the tax credit if you qualify the prices are still very high and many people just can’t afford it so they will hang on to the old smoke dragons or find a used model.
 
I’m a 24/7 burner. Go through 4 -5 cords a year and do not use any other heat source in my 2000 sqft home. The layout is open and ideal to heat with a high efficiency unit.

I have 15 cords of wood stored for my three year supply. Which takes up a lot of space. My concern with the new EPA stoves is the burners of yesteryear may not always have the money to afford the new stoves nor the space needed to store three years worth of wood.

I’m all in favor of higher efficiencies and improving the environment. But will the demand for new stoves decline overtime based on these factors?
 
Dry wood is not just for new stoves. Any stove is going to perform better and cleaner when burning dry wood. Note that EPA stoves have been out since the late 1980s, this is not a new phenomenon.
 
Were older stoves built better? You don’t hear about stove guts melting away on an old fisher. Or hinges failing, or welds cracking.
 
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Were older stoves built better? You don’t hear about stove guts melting away on an old fisher. Or hinges failing, or welds cracking.
Lots of welds cracked on old stoves lots of hinges failed. And it's hard to melt the guts out of a stove when there aren't any guts.
 
The poor quality older stoves probably failed long ago.
Yes the ones that are left are either the good ones or just not used. But it is also allot easier to build just a plain steel box that holds up than one that has allot of air passages etc
 
Dry wood is not just for new stoves. Any stove is going to perform better and cleaner when burning dry wood. Note that EPA stoves have been out since the late 1980s, this is not a new phenomenon.
Yes, I’ve learned so much about the differences between wet versus dry wood. My burning has improved dramatically and the amount of wood used decreased. It’s a win win. However, the unforgiving nature of the new EPA stoves forces the user to burn properly. I still have to believe the majority of today’s burners are using older more forgiving stoves using wet wood. As more new stoves are installed, consumers will learn of the need for dry wood and the space needed for this wood.
This just makes me wonder if consumers will adapt or if the demand for stoves will be reduced because consumers don’t have the space or don’t want to invest the time it takes to obtain dry wood.
 
They've had 3 decades to adapt but some never will. Old habits can be hard to break. You can tell by the smoldering fug coming out of their chimneys.
 
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I have 15 cords of wood stored for my three year supply. Which takes up a lot of space. My concern with the new EPA stoves is the burners of yesteryear may not always have the money to afford the new stoves nor the space needed to store three years worth of wood.

It's a very valid point, a new BK is knocking on the door of $5k at my local dealer, and while they are a great stove, a consumer on a tight budget is probably going to buy a 20+ year old used model for less than $500 instead.
 
Agreed, many stoves are now priced out of the average new buyer. Hopefully they will come here and we can recommend good stoves in the $1000-2000 range to them.
 
It's a very valid point, a new BK is knocking on the door of $5k at my local dealer, and while they are a great stove, a consumer on a tight budget is probably going to buy a 20+ year old used model for less than $500 instead.
Lots of nice Canadian stoves that are quite cheap. 1-2k for new as bg points out. If you want a Mercedes BK then it costs more.
 
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Lots of nice Canadian stoves that are quite cheap. 1-2k for new as bg points out. If you want a Mercedes BK then it costs more.

Absolutely, reason I brought up the BK is my brother is in this situation, they bought a house with an existing chimney, issue is it's 8". For what he needs a BK King would be ideal, but the price is hard to justify in natural gas savings, and 8" stoves aren't all that common anymore to explore other options.
 
Manufacturers did increase prices...but not because of the tax credit. Have you seen wage rates in WA state? Palladium/platinum prices, glass prices for premium German glass? Shipping costs are nuts! The prices are up and will continue to go up in the current climate.

Five years ago you could hire employees for $17/hr to start. Taco Bell here pays $19. Now you have to pay much more. This has nothing to do with the tax credit.

I just returned from Germany. I paid $5 (euro conversion) per litre for diesel. 3.875 x $5 = $19.375/ gallon. Luckily it was a hybrid and got great mileage.

You can expect prices to continue to increase until something changes.

P.S. My wife just paid $14 for the exact same aluminum foil that was $4 just 3 years ago.

BKVP