Will Rust Keep Occuring?

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brenndatomu

Minister of Fire
Aug 21, 2013
6,358
NE Ohio
You absolutely see the difference. It stands out like a sore thumb
New paint on old paint is gonna stick out anyways, unless the whole thing gets painted...but it'll all blend together by January...
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
24,991
central pa
New paint on old paint is gonna stick out anyways, unless the whole thing gets painted...but it'll all blend together by January...
Brushed metallic will never blend you will always see it. I have tried.
 

Caw

Minister of Fire
May 26, 2020
934
Massachusetts
If you have linseed oil, that is a hard drying oil that will protect any bare metal until lightly sanded or cleaned down to bare metal before paint.

I actually do have linseed oil that I use for oil/pumice finishes in woodworking. So you're saying I can rub a light coating on now to stop the rust then I can simply sand it off when I'm ready to paint? That won't mess up the finish later on?

It makes sense, it's blocking the oxygen from contacting the steel. Just verifying before I do it. Id feel better stopping it until I'm ready ready paint this fall. Thanks!

Crisco is definitely out, Gordon would be all over that. Pretty funny how small a 200 lb dog makes a 1.85 cu ft stove look. That little guy heats my whole 1700 sq ft 2 story cape! Gordon also supplies plenty of methane.
 

brenndatomu

Minister of Fire
Aug 21, 2013
6,358
NE Ohio
Brushed metallic will never blend you will always see it. I have tried.
I thought this was just about stopping the rust for now...then the whole thing is to be sprayed at some later date?
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
88,932
South Puget Sound, WA
Ya know, with the concerns about looking new and old slobberchops nearby, you might consider a repaint with a glossy paint. Not my favorite look, but it does not show these issues as readily and can be wiped down clean.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
24,991
central pa
Ya know, with the concerns about looking new and old slobberchops nearby, you might consider a repaint with a glossy paint. Not my favorite look, but it does not show these issues as readily and can be wiped down clean.
Have you found any that hold up well? I never really looked into it but I am a little curious.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
88,932
South Puget Sound, WA
I haven't tried it but I do know that enameled stoves are much easier to keep clean. So are porcelain surfaces, so that is the hypothesis behind the suggestion. Wipe-ability being the advantage. Works for engines. Krylon has a high-haet max gloss black that looks interesting.

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coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
4,235
NE PA
I actually do have linseed oil that I use for oil/pumice finishes in woodworking. So you're saying I can rub a light coating on now to stop the rust then I can simply sand it off when I'm ready to paint? That won't mess up the finish later on?

It makes sense, it's blocking the oxygen from contacting the steel. Just verifying before I do it. Id feel better stopping it until I'm ready ready paint this fall. Thanks!

Crisco is definitely out, Gordon would be all over that. Pretty funny how small a 200 lb dog makes a 1.85 cu ft stove look. That little guy heats my whole 1700 sq ft 2 story cape! Gordon also supplies plenty of methane.
Yes, boiled linseed dries faster than raw. It has been used on metal farm equipment for years. I keep handles coated with it as well as the steel shovel, rake, whatever. Darkens the metal and dries with a hard golden brown finish. Raw soaks into wood longer, takes days to dry compared to hours. It actually strengthens the wood fibers. I use the raw version on wooden wheel spokes. Before paint it can be removed with lacquer thinner. Mineral spirits generally doesn’t harm cured paint or oils, lacquer thinner does.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
24,991
central pa
I haven't tried it but I do know that enameled stoves are much easier to keep clean. So are porcelain surfaces, so that is the hypothesis behind the suggestion. Wipe-ability being the advantage. Works for engines. Krylon has a high-haet max gloss black that looks interesting.

Amazon product
I might have to get some and try it
 

Caw

Minister of Fire
May 26, 2020
934
Massachusetts
Ya know, with the concerns about looking new and old slobberchops nearby, you might consider a repaint with a glossy paint. Not my favorite look, but it does not show these issues as readily and can be wiped down clean.

I think im over the looking new part of it, I have come to accept with the kids and dog that's never going to happen. I just don't want it to get damaged from rust. It's definitely only mild surface rust, I'm probably being a little paranoid, but it's still pretty new so it bugs me.

The glossy idea is interesting. I'd be curious to see what you find out bholler.
 

Woody5506

Minister of Fire
Feb 14, 2017
867
Rochester NY
I've sandblasted and painted old ROUGH stoves at work. For a high heat gloss I always recommend a brand called Temperkote. The stuff looks really nice. They have a stove paint line as well but I've never used it, I always just use their high heat industrial coatings. Next time I do think I'll try something from their stove line though. Pricey stuff at maybe $100/gallon but well worth it.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
24,991
central pa
Keep in mind an engine only gets to like 2-300 degrees. I don't think a high gloss paint would hold up, enamel is a different beast than a paint.
Yes I am aware it needs to be 1200+ paint
 

brenndatomu

Minister of Fire
Aug 21, 2013
6,358
NE Ohio
Keep in mind an engine only gets to like 2-300 degrees. I don't think a high gloss paint would hold up, enamel is a different beast than a paint.
I've had good luck using Rustoleum High Temp gloss black (1200*) on stoves...actually have done some tu-tone stuff that turned out nice...did the body in flat black (BBQ black) and the door in (semi?) gloss...pretty sharp, has held up fine.
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