Wood Furnace Recommendations

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highandlonesome

New Member
Jan 9, 2022
6
Central Newfoundland
New here but have been using this site a long time.

I have a 1000 square foot log house. I jacked it up this fall and put in a basement and poured a floor as it only had a crawl space before which was a disaster. I have stone veneer/concrete 'stones' along the plywood sheathing above ice block forming basement walls. I used stone as the house is built of white cedar from BC and i knew the spruce siding around here would never match when stained. I was late putting up the vapor barrier but had batts up and when checking behind them noticed a sheet of ice on the sheathing and ice on the nails for the mortar vent. Then i found mold starting. 10 degrees Celsius down there with 68 - 80 % humidity. Obviously I need heat down there to dry everything up and eliminate the humidity.

Before I raised the house i heated the entire place with a blaze king ashford stove. It did pretty well but struggled to pump heat down the long house at deep cold - betwwn -10 and -25 Celsius. I have a 7" chimney for the stove. I have decided to put in a wood furnace in the basement with a vent or two in the living room, mud room, two bedrooms, and kitchen. Should also solve my basement troubles.

From what I've read here I shouldnt run my furnace through the same chimney that runs from my stove upstairs, through the wall 4 feet above it and out through the wall to the chimney. As such, it seems i'll need another chimney running out through either the cement knee wall or stone veneer.

As for wood furnaces, any recommendations? I need to get it in as soon as possible. I'd like as efficient as possible as I work 45 minutes from home and work 9 hour days outside of commute and would like to come home to at least coals.

I'm in Central Newfoundland Canada
 
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Tonty

Member
Jul 24, 2017
79
Kansas
I don’t like to hear that mold word. It can be hard to get rid of that.
I run a wood fired boiler, so don’t know much about the furnaces. But if I was going to get a furnace, from what I’ve heard and read, I’m pretty sure I would not look much further than a Kuuma Vapor-fire 100. They look like a great unit, and I’m sure you’ll hear some good reviews from them on here. They are EPA phase two certified, but that doesn’t really apply up there.
The problem is, I understand that the lead time on them is quite long. I’m also not sure about them going into Canada.
 
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New here but have been using this site a long time.

I have a 1000 square foot log house. I jacked it up this fall and put in a basement and poured a floor as it only had a crawl space before which was a disaster. I have stone veneer/concrete 'stones' along the plywood sheathing above ice block forming basement walls. I used stone as the house is built of white cedar from BC and i knew the spruce siding around here would never match when stained. I was late putting up the vapor barrier but had batts up and when checking behind them noticed a sheet of ice on the sheathing and ice on the nails for the mortar vent. Then i found mold starting. 10 degrees Celsius down there with 68 - 80 % humidity. Obviously I need heat down there to dry everything up and eliminate the humidity.

Before I raised the house i heated the entire place with a blaze king ashford stove. It did pretty well but struggled to pump heat down the long house at deep cold - betwwn -10 and -25 Celsius. I have a 7" chimney for the stove. I have decided to put in a wood furnace in the basement with a vent or two in the living room, mud room, two bedrooms, and kitchen. Should also solve my basement troubles.

From what I've read here I shouldnt run my furnace through the same chimney that runs from my stove upstairs, through the wall 4 feet above it and out through the wall to the chimney. As such, it seems i'll need another chimney running out through either the cement knee wall or stone veneer.

As for wood furnaces, any recommendations? I need to get it in as soon as possible. I'd like as efficient as possible as I work 45 minutes from home and work 9 hour days outside of commute and would like to come home to at least coals.

I'm in Central Newfoundland Canada
As stated you should look at the kuuma if you can swing the price cause it’s the best on the market. If you can’t the next best thing for affordability is the heat commander. Central nfld I assume you’ll be burning a lot of softwoods.
 
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brenndatomu

Minister of Fire
Aug 21, 2013
7,081
NE Ohio
Kuuma Vapor-fire 100. They look like a great unit, and I’m sure you’ll hear some good reviews from them on here. They are EPA phase two certified, but that doesn’t really apply up there.
The problem is, I understand that the lead time on them is quite long. I’m also not sure about them going into Canada.
As of last week I heard they have an 8 week lead time...and they ship into Canada all the time, they just make you find your own "agent"...whatever that means...
 

highandlonesome

New Member
Jan 9, 2022
6
Central Newfoundland
Thanks bys. I decided on putting a blaze king king down there and figure out how to get some heat upstairs. I figure should i sort a cold air return to basement floor and install some fire dampered floor registers i'll get the heat up and i've got the other stove there to take the chill on cold nights.

Decision based on the expense of running ducts and expense of furnace (was much more than expecting), burn times on the furnaces i saw, length of time to get something in, and losing some head space in the basement due to ducts. King stove should give me the heat and burn times I need without having to run duct work.

We'll see. Worse case it goes into the garage but for the price it was worth the try
 
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Thanks bys. I decided on putting a blaze king king down there and figure out how to get some heat upstairs. I figure should i sort a cold air return to basement floor and install some fire dampered floor registers i'll get the heat up and i've got the other stove there to take the chill on cold nights.

Decision based on the expense of running ducts and expense of furnace (was much more than expecting), burn times on the furnaces i saw, length of time to get something in, and losing some head space in the basement due to ducts. King stove should give me the heat and burn times I need without having to run duct work.

We'll see. Worse case it goes into the garage but for the price it was worth the try
I was gunna upgrade my previous stove to a BK too but my decision was easier because I did have all the existing ductwork. It’s worth a shot anyway if it doesn’t work out look to upgrade in the future best of luck!
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
4,353
Long Island NY
Regarding vents, make sure you can make a circuit for air to go around.

You could make two large vents, the cold air return with a chase opening exiting 2 ft below the main floor, and another vent just in the floor (or if the stairs are in a good location that's the only thing needed to move up the hot air).

Yes, be aware of the local code regarding floor penetrations. Fire dampers may be needed.