Wood Stove install & cathedral Ceiling

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korbin

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Feb 12, 2014
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Hello, my name is Korbin and I am a new member here. I've been doing A LOT of reading around here (and elsewhere) and have found this site VERY informative. So I want to say thanks to all who contribute to the community. I am a member of many other forums but new to heating my home with via wood. I purchased this > http://www.heatilatorecochoice.com/products/details.asp?cat=wood-stoves&f=ws22 < wood stove and have built a nice hearth pad using the corner method in my living room using all clearances necessary and also made walls surrounding the stove of non combustable material via cement fiber board and thick ceramic tile. My home is a 1 1/2 story with cathedral ceilings on the other "1/2" over the living room where the Stove is to be used where I have cathedral ceilings. The pitch of the roof is a 12/12 pitch and this is where my question comes into play. I have chosen to use all double wall "Dura vent" for the inside and triple wall from ceiling support box joint all the way to the top cap. Being as the stove is installed in the very corner of the room I am wanting to use two 45 degree elbows "both double wall "dura vent" " and run with the 45 degree pitch for roughly 7 feet until it meets the top of ceiling and then I can run it straight out and above the roof line as such. The picture I've included is not of my set-up (borrowed from the web, I do not own rights to this picture) as I have all the materials but have not installed yet. This picture is VERY close to how I would run chimney. Is this considered OK for draft? I understand cleaning will be a bit of a challenge, lets put that issue aside for a second and talk about the actual function of draft and creosote build up using this method. The wood I will be burning is clean, well season hickory and oak. The total chimney height from stove top to top cap is roughly 26' -28' and total horizontal length will be almost exactly 8' ( so 12' between 45 degree elbows) What are your thoughts?
45 through house.jpg
 
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korbin

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Feb 12, 2014
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Here is a picture of my actual install location. You can see my hearth (not 100% complete yet) in bottom of photo and the top of the ceiling in upper portion of picture. Sorry if the photo looks funny but it was the best angle I could get since the room is actually taller than it is wide or long :) Also included a picture of my almost completed hearth. hearth build.jpgmy set up.jpg
 

rwhite

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What's the reason for not going straight up through the roof?
 

GENECOP

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He is probably trying to avoid all the tie back supports because the chimney would still have to go higher than the ridge...this way he is supported inside and only stubbing out a few feet above the ridge...
 

rwhite

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He is probably trying to avoid all the tie back supports because the chimney would still have to go higher than the ridge...this way he is supported inside and only stubbing out a few feet above the ridge...
Figured that may be the reason but wasn't sure. It looks like a gambrel roof that would not need much outer chimney to get the proper clearances but I'm sure a support would be needed. Although the example pic is not a horizontal run I would worry about that length of side run without a support in the middle. As far a draft it should be ok though.
 

shoot-straight

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i have catherdral cielings in my stove room. my pipe is lined ss inside a masonary chimney. its like a rocket ship. i would guess with the double wall it will draft ok once the pipe gets hot. that certainly is alot of pipe! i will say my upstairs is sometimes 15 deg warmer than down even with a ceiling fan running.
 

logger

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I'd MUCH rather go straight up and use the necessary support on the roof, but thats just me.
 

begreen

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Yes, I would have put the hearth just to the right of the large side window. That would have allowed a straight shot up. If you go with 45s remember that double wall connector needs 9" clearance from the ceiling.
 

NVHunter

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Nov 3, 2013
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Duravent DVL double wall stove pipe requires 6" of clearance from combustible walls and 8" of clearance for horizontal ceiling runs.

Here's a section from the manual.

image.jpg
 
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begreen

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Right you are. That's what I get for trusting my rusty memory.
 
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korbin

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Feb 12, 2014
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What's the reason for not going straight up through the roof?
supported inside and only stubbing out a few feet above the ridge...
Exactly, Also having more of the stove pipe inside will help to release a little extra heat before exiting to outside. But overall the thought of having 15 or maybe more feet of 6" triple wall coming out of the eve end of the roof is sort of wild.

Thanks to all who replied. We did consider putting the stove just to the right of that bigger window as begreen stated but the corner was really the only option here for several reasons... Biggest being esthetically pleasing to my wife :rolleyes: SO I told her I would gladly figure SOMETHING out :) Once It is completed here in the next week Ill repost the results after I get It fired up and running. Thanks again

-korbin
 

korbin

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Here are better/more pictures for you all to get a better idea of the situation as a whole. Can't seem to upload the picture of the outside of house vertically ? sorry about that. Please excuse the lack of downspout and GIANT icicles coming from my gutters ==c I was in the process of restoring the cedar siding and had it all down when Cold weather set in. I tend to get a little "distracted" at times....
photo 1.JPG photo 2.JPG
 

begreen

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Exactly, Also having more of the stove pipe inside will help to release a little extra heat before exiting to outside.
For a connector run as long as is proposed you want to do everything you can to stop the pipe from losing heat. Even with double-wall connector the heat loss for that lenght of run will be substantial. Too much cooling in the long run of connector will lead to creosote accumulation when the flue gas temps drop below 250F. You definitely don't want that to happen. Get a stove that will heat efficiently and don't try to scavenge any more with the pipe.
 
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korbin

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For a connector run as long as is proposed you want to do everything you can to stop the pipe from losing heat. Even with double-wall connector the heat loss for that lenght of run will be substantial. Too much cooling in the long run of connector will lead to creosote accumulation when the flue gas temps drop below 250F. You definitely don't want that to happen. Get a stove that will heat efficiently and don't try to scavenge any more with the pipe.
Thank you for the advise, I may look at double wall insulated then instead of double wall DVL like I have purchased. I can always return it. It is all sitting in boxed ready to be put up. I have considered using "supervent" as the chimney system instead because it has insulated double VS. the duravent that had no insulation
 

begreen

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No, you are correct in using DVL. DVL is all you will be using on the interior. Class A (exterior insulated high temp chimney pipe) doesn't have 45 deg elbows. I just wanted to point out in case another person read this thread and considered using single-wall for more heat off the pipe. If anything consider making the run shorter by relocating the stove so the pipe can go straight up. DVL inside and DuraTech for class A is a fine combo.
 
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valley ranch

Feeling the Heat
The part going through the ceiling could go in to a ceiling box which will support the stack from there on up and a jack in the crest is the least likely to leak. At Kirkwood, a ski area here in the mountains, that how it's done. If I build another house that's the way I'd do it. If there is no Ridge Beam that's the way. And single wall before entering the ceiling box, as was said before "all that extra heat."

To support the single wall I'd use heavy strap around the pipe with a rod stand off, I'd weld a flat base that I could attach to a rafter or boards in this case. You may be able to buy such a thing now, if not I'd make them.
The stand offs would keep the pipe 18" inch away from the ceiling, a half curl made of single wall pipe, you can by these or make them, can be attached above the upper part of the pipe about 1" away from the pipe, they act as a heat shield and radiate heat, if you wish you can, with this addition, put the single wall closer to the ceiling.

I think your chimney is tall enough to more than overcome the horizontal, the pipe above the roof would be, 2' higher than the nearest point 5' away.

A friend with a similar situation put in a ceiling fan, the fan moved the air keeping the house warm all around, even at floor level and in the back rooms.

When building this house, I put the roof jack just to the side of the crest, because of the Ridge Beam. Good luck, looks great.

Richard
 
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pen

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as was said before "all that extra heat."
The OP is set with understanding losses associated with a long run, but I want to make clear to future readers that "all that extra heat" as is assumed from single wall pipe, is bad advice:

I'm not certain what the stove is that this chimney will be attached to, however, I state caution when suggesting to use too much single wall pipe.

10 feet of single wall pipe is stated in certain stove manuals as being the maximum allowed due to the heat loss (which using single wall may seem good since its loss is added to the home,,,, but) makes a deficit towards proper draft for a unit as well as increasing the likelihood of creosote deposits and associated fire risks.

pen
 
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korbin

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Feb 12, 2014
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The OP is set with understanding losses associated with a long run, but I want to make clear to future readers that "all that extra heat" as is assumed from single wall pipe, is bad advice:

I'm not certain what the stove is that this chimney will be attached to, however, I state caution when suggesting to use too much single wall pipe.

10 feet of single wall pipe is stated in certain stove manuals as being the maximum allowed due to the heat loss (which using single wall may seem good since its loss is added to the home,,,, but) makes a deficit towards proper draft for a unit as well as increasing the likelihood of creosote deposits and associated fire risks.

pen
Thank you for the reply, I understand the need to clarify that information and it's importance for future readers.
 

pen

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need a sanity check - is this 10' away...? i might be reading it wrong... thanks
You nailed it.

3 feet above the roof line and 2 feet higher than anything that is within 10 feet of the cap.

pen
 

begreen

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10-3-2 rule.JPG
 
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