Year-end cleaning procedure for Ravelli stoves

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MacGyverS2000

Member
Oct 13, 2015
7
Glenelg, MD
Seen a few posts over the years asking for such a procedure, but so far none have met with a real answer (other than generics). I've owned a Ravelli in one form or another for over 10 years, with the latest being a Holly-C/RC120, and overall I'm quite happy with their operation... but their mechanical design engineers could use a swift kick.

I'm wondering if anyone has had any success with cleaning the heat exchanger tubes? The scraping rod is a cluster... after a year or two of using it, the scraper gets clogged with ash at both ends of its travel, reducing the scraper's travel distance more and more with each cleaning. I've mitigated that somewhat by getting in there (via the fire pit) from time to time with a thick piece of copper wire to break free the ash "dams" at each end, but it's a real convoluted pathway and takes a while to get even a mediocre cleaning (and forget seeing what you're doing, it has to be done by feel). The side access panels at the top are about the size of three fingers and don't provide direct access to the tubes, so they're all but pointless... not even sure why they put them in there.

Perhaps there's another way to access the tubes I'm not aware of? I haven't tried removing any interior screws associated with the fire pit for fear it would be an endless process of removing one set of screws and panel to find yet another underneath (or worse, a gasket that's not readily replaceable). If no one has a video of the year-end cleaning procedure, does anyone at least have some tips on how to better get in there and clean that area?

Thanks!
 

MacGyverS2000

Member
Oct 13, 2015
7
Glenelg, MD
High pressure air with a long skinny nozzle. Outside :) That’s how i clean all my stoves at the end of the year.
Probably not the most realistic method for me (stove is down in the basement). To compound the other cleaning issues, the scraper has a front/back plate that move barely enough to get the wire in front/behind the respective plate. I'm just astounded they would design such a system with no clear path to clean it. It works beautifully when everything is new, but give it 8-10 tons and it really starts getting gunked up. I keep hoping for someone to point out a hidden panel or set of screws I hadn't realized were meant to come out.
 

Washed-Up

Minister of Fire
Nov 5, 2011
664
Kananaskis,Alberta, Canada
Leaf blower trick on any exhaust should work, combined with compressed air.

 
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bob bare

Minister of Fire
Oct 31, 2013
3,136
park county montana
LOL! I could say a bunch more,but european stove manufacturers expect people to pay a stove tech to come in and do a full refurbish on the stove.Has been that way for years.Well,except for Austroflamm,and Rika,they released all info.
 
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MacGyverS2000

Member
Oct 13, 2015
7
Glenelg, MD
Leaf blower trick on any exhaust should work, combined with compressed air.
WU, I have the flue cleaning well in hand, and unfortunately a leaf blower is not going to remove the caked-on ash along the heat exchanger tubes... with Ravellis (at least this one), there are too many tight nooks/crannies. The compressed air could likely help some, but it's not feasible to blow ash everywhere in the basement.

I continue to look for easier access to the heat exchanger tubes... even if the European companies expect you to call in a "pro", as Bob suggests, even they have to get in there somehow.
 

Washed-Up

Minister of Fire
Nov 5, 2011
664
Kananaskis,Alberta, Canada
Well, if you have the leaf blower hooked up and on vacuum and then use compressed air, the ash can only go up and out the flue....it’s how I clean my stove every few month’s....I never have an issue with ash flying out into my house.