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1.25" THERMOPEX INTO BUILDING

Post in 'The Boiler Room - Wood Boilers and Furnaces' started by jimde, Nov 26, 2009.

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  1. jimde

    jimde New Member

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    I am installing my thermopex from my home to the outbuilding. The problem I have is that I cant cut out the slab to come through bottom due to having infloor tubes. The thermopex is way to stiff to come up at a 90 degree and then turn it through the wall. I think the only option I have is to cut it off above grade alongside of the building and then 45 or 90 into the building. I guess i could attempt to cut a oblong hole in my building and attempt to come out of the groung at a 45 through the wall ,but this may be difficult. Does anyone have any advice on how I should do this? Also is anyone aware of any special fittings or accessories to accomplish this.

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  2. rkusek

    rkusek Minister of Fire

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    If you only have 4" concrete and know for sure where your infloor tubes lie at the corner, I would consider using a concrete core bit on a hammer drill. You would probably need a 4". I drilled 2 smaller (2 3/4" I think) holes about 6" from the edge of my concrete to run my 2 separate pex lines through the floor. I was able to dig out enough of the dirt underneath from the side of the building to make the bend up through the floor and tamped it all back nice after pex was sprayed. If you don't remember where the infloor lines were placed then this might not work unless you are lucky with the drill. Freezing would be a concern if you came up outside the building. Even if you circ constantly, anything can happen. Lose power,circ dies, etc.
  3. Tony H

    Tony H New Member

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    If you do have to use couplings make sure they are above ground and accessible . I have seen people build an insulated cover to help keep it warm and put some heat tape around the pipe to prevent freezing
  4. Medman

    Medman Feeling the Heat

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    Exactly what I did to avoid cutting into the concrete - I came up vertical from the trench alongside the building, added a 90* pex to thread fitting and straight in through the wall. I built an enclosure for the pipe above ground, used heat tape and insulated. Heat tape has a sensor so that if temp goes low enough the heat tape comes on. I had the enclosure clad with flashing to match the rest of the house. No problems so far, and all fittings are accessible if needed.
  5. jimde

    jimde New Member

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    Do you think attempting to come out of the ground at a 45 degree angle and then through the wall is a better option? Once inside the building the thermopex could then make a sweep toward the boiler.
  6. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    Like all this stuff, depends on the details, but my root assumption would be that you want to minimize the amount of plumbing that is exposed / above the frost line. I'd also transition from thermopex to regular pex as soon as I got into the building, or maybe just outside if you are putting fittings there and will be providing enough insulation - no sense in paying for buriable grade insulation you don't need....

    Gooserider
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