13-nc corner hearth

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by method6676, Sep 10, 2008.

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  1. method6676

    method6676
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    Hello all! I have thoroughly enjoyed browsing through the site, researching my upcoming woodstove purchase. I have decided on the 13-nc. First of all, it seems that everywhere I have looked, the reviews are always positive. Secondly, it is mobile-home approved(with an outside air intake of course). My mobile home is about 1200 sq. ft so I think this should be adequate to cut into the ridiculously high price of propane for the furnace.

    My question is about installing a slightly raised hearth in the corner of my living room. Due to space limitations in my living room layout, I opted for a corner hearth. Does installing cementboard and porcelain tile on the walls behind the stove reduce required clearances? I am looking for the smallest possible corner hearth size, while still maintaining required clearances. Any thoughts or info would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks,
    Steve
     

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  2. Elfin

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    In my home project, Steve, it did not. Cement board and tile are not considered combustible, so when the building inspector came by he measured out from the drywall, even though I had about 2" thick tile (in some places) around my stove. The whole thing made me really nervous, but my stove installer assured me that the tile would not mess up my clearances, and they were right.
     
  3. fossil

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    The clearances from combustibles are layed out very specifically in the manufacturer's literature. If you install with no heat shielding, then these are the clearances to which you must adhere. If you'd like to place the appliance closer to a combustible surface, say the wall behind the stove, then you have the option of installing some sort of heat shield between the stove and the combustible wall. There are different ways, using different materials to construct such a heat shield, but they all require that the material used be non-combustible. The allowable clearance reduction for a heat shield is expressed as a percentage of the unshielded requirement. For example, if the unshielded requirement is that the stove be 18" from the rear wall, and you install a shield that allows you a 33% reduction, then the stove may be placed 12" from the combustible wall...measured from the stove to the combustible, as though the shield weren't there. Make any sense? Rick
     
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  4. fossil

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    BTW, Steve...I hope I'm preachin' to the choir here and that you've already researched this stuff...but mobile home installation has some specific requirements, as I understand it. First & foremost, the stove model has to be approved for such installation. I think they all require an Outside Air Kit (OAK) be installed for combustion air, and the stove has to be firmly affixed to the floor structure. I'm not an expert, so check my math. :) Rick

    EDIT: Ahh...rereading your original post tells me you're way ahead of me here...good fer you!
     
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  5. fossil

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  6. method6676

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    Wow! Thanks for the quick reply! I'm pretty sure I understand now, but just to make sure...the exhaust output center to wall clearance requirement is 18", so by installing an approved shield to the wall, the clearance would be reduced to 12" measured from the exhaust pipe center to the combustible wall...not to the approved shield. If that's the case, how do find out if a layer of hardibacker...mortar...and tile are an approved wall shield.

    Thanks again!

    -Steve
     
  7. fossil

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    Single wall stovepipe clearance to a combustible wall is 18"...not from the center of the pipe, but from the wall of the pipe closest to the combustible surface. A heat shield on single wall pipe will get you down to 12", some say 9". Double wall pipe will (I think) get you down to 6"...maybe 4"...check me on this, I'm not a professional. For the walls around the stove, a wall shiled is the way to go. For the vertical run of connector (Stovepipe) up to the adapter, a wall shield may be used, or a pipe-mounted shield. The ceiling adapter box and everything above that must be Class A chimney-rated.
     
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  8. BillT

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    Steve, I'm about to install the same set up. I'm about to buy a 13NC, placing it in a corner and I too have limited space. I'm going with the Heat Shields and the Englander tech help told me the clearance would then be 8 1/2 inches in the corner (info should be double checked) but I'm going to put mine at at least 10 inches anyway.

    Bill
     
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  9. method6676

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    Hello again! I talked to englander tech support this morning and they informed me that you can reduce the "D" and "E" dimensions in their manual by 66% by using heat shields spaced 1" off of the wall. This would also require the use of Simpson DVL stovepipe(or a similar double wall), which is required for mobile home installation as well(at least around here). Unless you can still achieve the required distance to combustibles for the stovepipe itself.

    I was wondering if anyone has spaced the cement board and tile off of the walls successfully and if so, how did they dress the edges of the tile/cementboard?

    Again, any help would be greatly appreciated!

    Thanks,

    Steve
     
  10. Tfin

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    I have the Englander 13 installed in the corner of my living room. I purchased the side heat shields for the stove as well and have the two back corners about 9 1/2" from the wall. I personally wouldn't want the stove any closer to the walls, even with wall shields. At this distance it leaves my single wall stove pipe beyond the required 18" from the wall.

    Looks great, and doesn't stick out to far into the room either. Good luck with your install.
     
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  11. Jags

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    Method, you may want to keep in mind that the heat shield MUST have gaps all the way around (floor included). The config that you are looking at is gonna be pretty heavy to hang off of a few screws that are spaced away from the wall. Not impossible, but you may want to consider weight when building this. Most heat shields are made from light gauge metals. BUT, if you make this successfully, you MUST post pictures. Its not my rules, I'm just passing them along. %-P
     
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  12. fossil

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    It's OK for it to be supported from the floor...just not all the way across. Gotta have gaps along the floor so it can establish a convective flow up along the back of the shield and out the top. The sides can actually be trimmed out to the wall. Rick

    EDIT: THe shield we ripped out of our house was built this way. Durock, then ceramic tiles to match the floor. It was thick enough that they wrapped edge tiles all around the perimeter. There were two panels of this, and they were plenty heavy, but the weight was borne by the floor, so the wall spacers/mounts just held the panels from falling over.
     
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  13. Jags

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    Ahh, floor mounted spacers. That would work.

    Edit: I wonder if you had the proper tools (like a rotozip), if you could cut out the bottom of the Durock to actually make "feet" out of the corners of the cement board? |__|-----------------|__|

    (cool graphics, huh?) :red:
     
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  14. fossil

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    Zackly...floor mounted spacers. In my shop, the rear heat shield is a brick wall. It's spaced out 1", and the mortar was simply left out from between the ends of the first course of brick. Voila!...it vents. The sides of the wall were mortared all the way up for appearance. The top of the wall is open. (Yes, the graphics are way cool.) Rick
     
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  15. fossil

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    This is what the old one in the house looked like. It's all completely gone now. Rick
     

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  16. method6676

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    You guys are awesome! Thanks for the ideas. Waking up to a cold house this morning is definitely pushing me towards starting construction sooner than later. I will keep the camera handy and post some pics of my progress.

    Thanks again!!

    -Steve
     
  17. Jags

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    Aww shucks. :red:
     
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  18. fossil

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    Steve, the 66% clearance reduction you got from tech support is certainly doable, it depends on how the shield is constructed. Check carefully through the linked articles I cited in an earlier post, and if you don't find the answer there, PM me or post again, and I can quote you from NFPA 211. Rick
     
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  19. Jags

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    As you can see here, Rick is doing all the work, but I will gladly take on the position of "trusty side kick". :cheese:
     
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  20. fossil

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    OK if I think up a funny new name for ya? %-P Rick
     
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  21. Jags

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    Now I'm scared!! :ahhh:
     
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  22. fossil

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    Woody? Stumpy? Dusty? Pokey? Smokey? McCord? Rick?...oh wait, that's my funny name. Rick
     
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    :lol: :lol: :lol:
     
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  24. method6676

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    After playing around with some layouts and rearranging some furniture, I decided to just go with a full 48" X 48" footprint. I will have more than enough clearance to the walls and the determining factor was that I shouldn't have to offset my stovepipe to fit precisely center between trusses. Should be a straight run up to the support box, centered between trusses. I am looking to start construction this weekend, so I will get some pictures posted.
     
  25. Tfin

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    Sounds good, can't wait to see em'!
     
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