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2 Questions on my Wood Stove(s) Project

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by adranus, Nov 10, 2011.

  1. adranus

    adranus New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2011
    Messages:
    12
    Loc:
    AZ
    Hi All,

    I'm getting ready to install the first of two wood stoves. It is a Regency model R6, 1988 vintage, with 6" plumbing. Last Saturday I poured a concrete hearth. The picture is my little boy keeping the concrete wet. I have two questions I'm hoping to get help with:

    1.) The Regency R6 is going in my basement. I will end up purchasing another wood stove to go in my great room on the main floor. It will be larger, and probably have an 8" exhaust. My question is, should I combine the chimney pipe for the two stoves into one, i.e. at the main floor the basement stove chimney pipe will tee into main stove chimney pipe and just one pipe will go on up through the roof? The basement stove is right under the main floor stove, and I have room in my chimney chase to go with two separate chimney pipes if I need to.



    2.) I'm struggling with how to exit my chimney with the chimney pipe. Right now my chimney is a 2x4 stick-framed with OSB sheathing under a half inch stucco skin. Inside dimensions of 2'6" x 2'11". At some point it will get a brick veneer. It is capped with a pretty blue tarp that flaps in the breeze and leaks like a sieve. I've read and researched tons about chimney caps (crowns), and I'm ready to pour a cast-in-place concrete cap, but I just don't know how to run the chimney pipe thru the cap. I see a lot of references to flues and flue liners, clay flues, etc. Do I need any of that, or can I just form an opening (or two if I go with two separate chimney pipes) slightly larger than the OD of the chimney pipe, then run the chimney pipe up thru the crown and caulk around it with high-temp caulk?



    Thanks so much for any guidance. I'm not adverse to researching on my own, just can't find any good direction anywhere else with the above questions.

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  2. davmor

    davmor Member

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    Loc:
    Northern Michigan
    You should not have two stoves venting into one chimney. I think it is against code too.
  3. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Northern IL
    On your first point - no. Each stove needs its own flue.

    On point two - a top plate is put into place and sealed to the chimney. It has a hole in it that your liner runs through and then capped if by itself, or if you are looking to pour a cap in place it will simply sit underneath it (with appropriate gap). But you still need a top plate.
  4. Waulie

    Waulie Minister of Fire

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    Loc:
    Nothern Lower Michigan
    You definately cannot vent two woodstoves into one flue. That is a big no-no. You will need two flues up through that chimney. The good news is it sounds like you have room for two.

    As to the rest, I'm no expert. Someone will come help soon.
  5. adranus

    adranus New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2011
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    Loc:
    AZ
    My picture didn't make it. I'm trying again.

    Thank you for the replies. I still need to figure out the top plate / chimney crown stuff, but I now clearly understand that I'm looking at two separate chimney pipes, not one.

    Attached Files:

  6. adranus

    adranus New Member

    Joined:
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    12
    Loc:
    AZ
    I'll be using DuraTech 6" chimney pipe for my chimney (8" OD). It will go thru the top plate and the cast-in-place crown (cap), then it will have a DuraTech Chimney Cap placed on it. My plan is to leave a 1/4" gap around the chimney pipe when I pour the crown. I'll then seal the gap with high temp RTV silicone. I don't plan to use any kind of clay flu or liner or anything else between the chimney pipe and the crown. Is that OK?

    Thanks.
  7. Hass

    Hass Minister of Fire

    Joined:
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    Loc:
    Alabama, NY
    holy hearth batman.
    Is he going to help you move it around too? :)
  8. adranus

    adranus New Member

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    AZ
    Thankfully, it is in it's final resting place!! (It's not very thick though--2 1/4 inches except around the edges it's 3")
  9. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Northern IL
    I didn't read anywhere in there about where you are going to insulate this. Is that part of the game plan? I would highly suggest it. EPA stoves try to run a cooler stack temp than the old dogs did which can become an issue when you have the old clay tile stealing heat from it. Consider pour in style insulation if nothing else. A few bag, a few bucks and a few minutes will go a long ways.
  10. adranus

    adranus New Member

    Joined:
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    Loc:
    AZ
    Jags, do you mean to insulate the chimney? Or just the cap around the chimney pipe? It would be easy to insulate the chimney, I still have access to the interior of it. . .

    Thanks.
  11. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    I mean to insulate the liner from the clay chimney. In between - so to speak.

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