a "burn"

cmonSTART Posted By cmonSTART, Dec 13, 2007 at 2:11 AM

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  1. cmonSTART

    cmonSTART
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    Nov 29, 2007
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    So, when we refer to a burn, what are we referring to? When does a "burn" start and end?
     
  2. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone
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    To me it's a painful condition I sometimes get on the backs of my hands and on my arms when I'm not careful loading the stove.

    HTH,
    Matt
     
  3. cmonSTART

    cmonSTART
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    Nov 29, 2007
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    ::sighs:: I walked into that one, didn't I?
     
  4. struggle

    struggle
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    Oct 24, 2006
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    Just this evening I raked some coals forward in the stove and could smell this burning odor and then it came to me that a coal popped out and wedged itself under my leg and I was wearing shorts as jeans are not an option in our house at the 24/7 stove running times.

    THAT WAS A BURN TO ME :gulp:
     
  5. Gibbonboy

    Gibbonboy
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    To be exactly the unit called one "burn", I think you'd count from the time you lit the fire until it was out. Generally, people just mean the time between normally-spaced reloads, however much fuel is added at one time. Could be an hour, could be 12. That's without getting all technical, of course.
     
  6. Lignums

    Lignums
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    When I got out of the shower and bent over to warm my arse by the stove and touched the edge of the stove, that was burn, a good 12 hour burn too.
     
  7. Corey

    Corey
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    You'll probably find a wide variation - you've got the lovely definitions already listed, then:

    1) From the time you light the fire until you can no longer rekindle the fire from the coals. I would think this is most commonly used as "an overnight burn" When you wake up in the morning, rake through the ash to get that little pile of coals, then rekindle it into a fire, most people would say "I had an overnight burn" or "12 hour burn"

    2) From the time you light the fire until the stove has gone cold - no longer putting out heat

    3) Modification of #2 - when you light the fire until the stove is no longer putting out enough heat to warm the house - or to put it in HVAC terms, "sensible heat"

    4) From the time you light the fire until no more flames are visible - not used much

    5) From the time you light the fire until you need to add more wood - again not used much, but this is what I would care most about: How often do I have to feed the monster??

    I'm sure you'll get plenty more responses!
     
  8. struggle

    struggle
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    OK OK the real answer here is people that have to pay heating bills via the gas or oil man are the ones getting BURNED :lol: ;-P
     
  9. swestall

    swestall
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    My take on a "BURN CYCLE" would be from the time you load until the time you know you have to reload because the coals are getting so small they aren't givning you enough heat, you are starting to get cold and your spouse or dog is yapping at you because you were the one who had this woodburning idea in the first place and it IS YOUR JOB to keep the place at 72 + now that they are spoiled.
     
  10. ClydesdaleBurner

    ClydesdaleBurner
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    I'll agree with SWESTALL. I'm a new burner this winter and I consider the burn time from the start of the kindling to having to reload, and that reload coming at a time when you living room starts to cool off even if there are some decent coals left. And cool off by a good amount... not 77 degrees to 76... maybe when it gets down into the high 60s, but I'm sure this varies for everyone.

    I can understand the 12 hr burn or overnight burn being a little more forgiving since you aren't there to tend to the fires needs, but if I'm in the living room and I see that the fire has started to lose a good amount of heat, its time to reload.
     
  11. rydaddy

    rydaddy
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    Sep 13, 2007
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    Ditto!
     
  12. woodzilla

    woodzilla
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    I had a friend who learned the true meaning of burn after a drunken hookup in college. ;-)
     
  13. savageactor7

    savageactor7
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    A couple of weeks back this question came up and many agreed to one of the Admins comment.... "a burn starts when the stove reaches 200*, burns for a time, then cools down to 200*"

    ...at which time the cooler temp requires you to reload and start burning again. That definition made sense to many here any seemed to be universally accepted at the time.
     
  14. swestall

    swestall
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    YUP, there is not a whole lot of difference between these definitions. Bottom line, it is what makes you comfortable within your home, that's what the stove is supposed to do.
     
  15. begreen

    begreen
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  16. paulie

    paulie
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    Nov 27, 2007
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    Savage7 you are correct, I asked the question, and BG seems to have the answer. A Typical stove will start heating at around 200*, therefore 200 to 200* would be a good determination of a burn time. You certainly can't count the minutes you are starting kindlin....makes no sence. theres no heat !
     
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