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Advice on stove selection

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by chemical_man, Feb 18, 2013.

  1. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,844
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Osburns are good basic stoves, like a Drolet with a tie. They offer good value.

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  2. Swedishchef

    Swedishchef Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2010
    Messages:
    2,586
    Loc:
    Quebec, Canada
    Halifax is a nice city. I have family that live there and a best buddy of mine lives out in Porter's Lake.

    I love my Osburn. Financially for me it made sense. I didn't have the money to spend 3K+ on a wood stove. The 2300 has a nice bypass feature and has a 3.1 cu.ft firebox. The bypass helps get the chimney warm faster and prevents smoke rollout. If I load at 75% capacity with hardwood I can have a nice bed of coals leftover after 10 hours. The glass door is huge which allows a nice view of the fire and the door is actually cast iron. Not to mention they are made in Quebec City and offer great customer support.
    raybonz likes this.
  3. Redlegs

    Redlegs Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2012
    Messages:
    282
    Loc:
    Eastern Kansas
    I did install an Osburn 2400 Insert last year. I am pleased with the preformance so far. Price vs. Value was the center of gravity for me. I wanted a lot of heat for the money. While I can get 12 hour burn times that result in a good pile of coals for a quick/easy restart, that is the exception rather than the rule (and it requires thought and planning ). I my mind where this insert really shines is that with little thought or effort it can get 8-ish hour burns times with plenty of heat, and that is more the norm. In cold spells I have left the draft just barely cracked open and get 5-6 hour burns that throw tons of heat. All of that said, I should add that my stove is in the downstairs of a split level ranch type house, and that leaves me with a 23.5 ft chimey height that still leaves a draft pulling hard enough to see some active flames even with the damper shut tight. I believe if I had it on the upper level, or anywhere with a 12-15 ft chimney, it would get a lot longer average burns. I have been toying with the idea of adding a flu damper, but I would have to a pro in for that since I suspect it would involve some brick work.
  4. Richprint29

    Richprint29 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2013
    Messages:
    15
    Loc:
    Newton NJ
    Check out the Harman Oakwood. That's my pick.
  5. chemical_man

    chemical_man New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2013
    Messages:
    34
    Loc:
    NS, Canada
    I got things settled. After the two nearby prominent companies gave their best offer, I felt it was overpriced and called around. Found a small local guy who was much more caring well say: gave a good overview of the products he uses, had been in business for 35 years, good references. And he gave a 20% discount on the total list cost which brought his estimate to a more reasonable cost (IMO of course).
    Settled on the Osburn 2000 which now comes with legs, standard (I hope) double wall stovepipe, and Duravent Plus HTC chimney. Looks pretty good I think. The pad I made with about 100 bricks and tile overtop (didn't have quite enough leftovers for the whole top, that's why there is a different tile at the centre).

    Thanks for the input!
    One other question, what have you guys used to insulate the space where the chimney punches through the wall? The black cover is fairly cold to the touch, I'm thinking I'll need to examine that sometime...

    [​IMG]
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    Swedishchef and raybonz like this.
  6. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2008
    Messages:
    6,207
    Loc:
    Carver, MA.
    Welcome to the forum Chem Man! I agree with Grisu, BG and Todd2.. Go to 3 cu. ft. with that much space to heat and a cool climate.. Never believe dealers selling seasoned wood as this is rarely the case.. Buy it green then stack in the wind and off the ground then you will know how long it is really seasoned ;)

    Ray
  7. Swedishchef

    Swedishchef Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2010
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    2,586
    Loc:
    Quebec, Canada
    How are you enjoying the stove?

    Down in NS you should be in full spring by now??

    Andrew
  8. chemical_man

    chemical_man New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2013
    Messages:
    34
    Loc:
    NS, Canada
    I throws a nice warm heat and radiates nicely though the house, we spent the weekend in the basement! Can't complain at all, except for the little wood I do have. I do look forward to next winter now!

    I still have a good foot of snow in my yard, temperatures are hovering around 0 as daytime highs, so not quite spring yet. Though I am sure it is warmer than what you have up North, Swede!

    Ray: some of the guys around here sell green wood at seasoned prices, when questioned about it, they simply say that it is up to me to season it....
    raybonz likes this.
  9. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
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    Nice job c-m, I like the legs too. If you are comfy at 0 degrees and not feeding the stove every 3 hrs, then I'd call this a total success.
    raybonz likes this.

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