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ATV log skidder

Post in 'The Gear' started by lumberchukk, Jan 27, 2008.

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  1. lumberchukk

    lumberchukk New Member

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    Anyone ever used one of these before on their quad to skid logs out of the woods?

    http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_6970_200325611_200325611

    I used to hook a chain to my logs and drag them out but I ended up dragging them through the mud and dirt and then destroying my saw chains. Now i use a cart behind the wheeler to haul out cut pieces to a place where I can get my truck to. But this method involves extra lifting and carrying (hard on the back). What's everyone else do?

    And in case anyone is interested I have a 450 Honda Foreman.

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  2. kenora

    kenora Member

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    WOW! thats expensive...for that much cut the log into manageable pieces where it falls and pull em out in a real ATV trailer, I'm sure a quality trailer is about the same amount and you can do lots more with it
  3. North of 60

    North of 60 Minister of Fire

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    I have posted these pics on some other threads. So hope no one gets sick of them. This is what I use.

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  4. kevin j

    kevin j Minister of Fire

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    Farm Show paper a month or two back had a homemade skidder like this for ATV. It used a boat winch to raise the log. Cinching ahead of center, raised the log until the front hit a cross member on the skidder, then raising the middle further caused the back end to come up off the ground for smaller logs. Bigger stuff, raise the front only as usual. He threw a chain under the middle and lowered the winch back down to take strain off the cable.

    I would be a bit cautious of brakes though, could get exciting!

    Farm Show is an ag related paper with many home built machines and shop ideas and new technology. I renewed last fall, but think is was like $20 a year. Very interesting reading.

    www.farmshow.com


    kcj
  5. kenora

    kenora Member

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    I have had this "yard trailer" for several years and use it to haul logs (I cut to about 4 ft) out of the woods, I got it used for $100 and its rated to 1200 lbs. The comment about being careful as you won't have brakes on the trailer are well thought. I have hauled up and down some pretty steep hills and rock cuts and 4X4 low range for maximum engine braking is a must and never side hill with a load. The good part of buying the trailer is it has a 1000 other uses! The one I use is behind the King Quad here (thats my daughter on the back :) )

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  6. savageactor7

    savageactor7 Minister of Fire

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    I have to agree that's way too expensive...I drag my logs as well. Look how many chains you could buy for that kind of money. It's hitting stones that's more destructive to chains than a little mud...of coarse it's nice to avoid it if possible.

    Like was previously suggested a high end wagon would be more useful in the long run...and I'm not talking about those cheap tinny carts either.
  7. jebatty

    jebatty Minister of Fire

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    Have considered something like the Northern Tool, and have made a similar unit from an old trailer, but hills and especially slopes are literal killers. Now like Catskill, I buck the logs where cut, usually also haul the splitter and split on site, tossing splits into the trailer. Greatly reduces handling, time, and body wear and tear.
  8. Ken45

    Ken45 Minister of Fire

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    For what they are showing, I think the 4wheeler would be overloaded. I know mine (Honda Foreman) says no more than 1000# towing and no more than 100# on the hitch. I wouldn't want to take a chance of damaging the rear end of the quad. Any decent sized log is going to weigh a fair amount AND figure the added load of the end you are dragging.

    I think it makes more sense if you're pulling it with a tractor.

    Ken
  9. kevin j

    kevin j Minister of Fire

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    Look how many chains you could buy for that kind of money. It’s hitting stones that’s more destructive to chains than a little mud...of coarse it’s nice to avoid it if possible.




    I think he meant saw chains, not log chains. Dirt on the bark takes off the razor edge in seconds.
    I wish I had either option-I have to cut where it lays and haul out rounds on a trailer, or get the pickup to it.

    k
  10. lumberchukk

    lumberchukk New Member

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    I think the cart is the way to go unless you are skidding logs in a field.
    I've pulled logs that were way too large with the foreman and it kind of made me cringe.
    It's a good thing Honda makes a quality machine.
  11. tkirk22

    tkirk22 New Member

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    Thanks for the heads up. Looks like good stuff.
  12. downeast

    downeast Guest

    The harvesting is done for a few reasons. First, getting 4-6 cords of hard firewood out of our woodlot. Then about 5-10 cords of 4' pulp logs from TSI or blowdowns for a neighbor who uses the income for taxes. Next, to improve the long term diversity of the forest by doing Timber Stand Improvement ( TSI). That really means that for every harvested firewood tree or pulp tree we harvest, many many more are removed around other trees for growth. And, third we use the harvesting as conditioning for our other sports and life. Harvesting wood is hard, enjoyable, challenging exercise. It gives us enough wood for 100% heating for a ~ 2000 ft² house; the money saved in our partial early retirement goes for travel and single malt. Damn satisfying.
    The logging is small scale with only our saws, a Honda Foreman with chains, hand tools such as a Peavy and Pulp Hook, and a small 3' X 4' trailer to haul the wood out. Skidding logs with chain or a logging arch made a mess of the trails and my chainsaws. Tree is felled, bucked in place, butts put ( humped) on the trailer or split if > 100lbs, then piled near the woodshed for later splitting and stacking. It's labor intensive, but satisfying for the winter work---no cutting in bug or heat time.
    Maybe when we get older, feeble, or otherwise incapacitated, or go back to our careers, we'll think about buying log lengths, or CSD ( cut/split/delivered). Our neighbors are in their 80's, still cutting all their own wood for heat AND cooking. There's hope for you out there..
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