Bio Bricks this season - 4 Tons!

cogger Posted By cogger, Sep 29, 2007 at 5:11 PM

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  1. cogger

    cogger
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    Oct 10, 2006
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    This year. NO sawing, NO spliting, NO stacking, NO large mess in the house. Skeptical, I tested and burned about a ton last year and was very happy. But these things have a cost right next to pellet fuel. Still good ol' wood is the way to go if you have the time to deal with it. But Bio's are freindly. I'll post some pics of new fisher stove and 4 ton pile later on.
     
  2. kwburn

    kwburn
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    yeah, i'd like to see a picture of 4 tons bio bricks.
    didn't know there was such a thing as a new fischer stove? new to you?
     
  3. Stevebass4

    Stevebass4
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    Nov 18, 2006
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    i tried the BioBricks last year and loved them however at the current cost per ton they just don't seem cost effective with regards to cord wood
     
  4. BioPellet

    BioPellet
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    Guys, BioBricks(tm) will change the way your woodstove burns! They will make it much cleaner, longer burning, more efficient. I strive to keep my cost similar to wood pellets. That gives the consumer a choice between a wood stove and a pellet stove. Why ask why people would buy BioBricks(tm) when cordwood is cheaper --- when there are so many folks around you that happily burn pellets (at a higher cost) instead of cordwood???
     
  5. Stevebass4

    Stevebass4
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    no question you make a great product.. i burn cord wood because it's much less expensive then heating oil and pellets

    i feel bad for the folks who have a pellet stove and have no control over the cost of pellets whereas i can control the cost of my cord wood - ie a cords worth of log lenght costs me 75.00 at most and i enjoy processing the wood

    my last quote from a dealer in MA (from craigslist) was 300 for a ton of Bio Bricks which is still more than 2* the cost of cord wood (if my math is correct)
     
  6. Mike Wilson

    Mike Wilson
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    Hey, I think they are, in concept, a great product. Really... idea-wise, the product itself hits the nail on the head. The problem is that retail cost, at least near me, is insane. In fact, I think that the overall theme of the posts on Bio-Bricks is "good product, much too expensive." As for comparing them to pellets, price-wise... yes, probably comparable. But, pellet stove users and wood stover users are two different animals. Pellet stove users are, inherently, aware of the fact that they are paying a significant premium for convenience... that is their defining aspect. Wood burners, on the other hand, are inherently cheap, or at least frugal, and are more than willing to put in days of labor to save a few bucks on the fuel they burn. And they are consciously aware of the fact that if they spent some more money on pellets, they would have convenience... but they don't want to spend the money, its in their nature not to. So, you are left selling a great product, to people who are inherently adverse to the price... even knowing the convenience. Do you get what I am saying? You know your business better than anyone else, but somehow, someone needs to get a handle on the ultimate retail price... unless they are selling so well that there is no incentive to do so... which I think may be the case.

    Either way, I want to buy a ton or three, but the people at Woodland Valley Fireplace are apparently ingesting large amounts of hallucinogenic materials, because they want way too much... as in, double the cost of a cord of splits... and no matter how that's rationalized, it's not happening. Its the same price as oil, and sorry folks, but when wood becomes the same price as oil, I'm burning dinosaur juice. Que sera...

    -- Mike
     
  7. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg
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    Mike and I agree great product but killer price.. Mike explained it well cost wise. Maybe you should compare with cord wood cost on pellets..

    I have used you bio bricks but 16c cords of free wood and counting it make no sense to me.

    BTW Biopellet PM me I'm working on something that should be of interest to you.
     
  8. GVA

    GVA
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    You need to add the fact that you don't have to cut those log lengths and split them and then season them in piles in your backyard for AT LEAST a year...to get the MC and BTU value down to the equivelant of the BIO's....
     
  9. elkimmeg

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    True GVA but no garage space or cellar is needed for cord wood stored and drying under nature's solar sun
     
  10. budman

    budman
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    Mike,WELL SAID ;-)
     
  11. Stevebass4

    Stevebass4
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    true but once you're a year ahead it's a moot point (waiting a year for the wood to season ;) ) but again - i enjoy it

    no question it's a great product as i purchased the last three bundles my local fireplace co had last year however they did not restock and the guy on CL was way too high
     
  12. GVA

    GVA
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    All good points but markets drive market prices....
    Up in my neck of the woods if someone were to buy seasoned hardwood they are looking at $225 a cord, and Bios at about $250 a ton.
    Most here in Mass don't have much land therefore storing the 4 cords a year plus next years wood does not make sense.....oherwise they won't have a backyard...
    And since the bio's take up about half the space of a cord with the same BTU's the one can store twice as much in the same space as a cord of wood.
    It don't matter to me guy's do what you want but just remember all those people that are putting stoves in thier condos, two family homes etc..and are looking to save some money and do not have the means to dry thier own supply or to store several cords...
     
  13. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart
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    If Bio Pellets and pellets are in parity cost wise I would rather get a pellet stove and dump a bag a day into it and be done with it. Why pay twice as much than for cordwood, in fact more since the processor down the road sells it for $160 a cord, and still have to hand feed and nurse the stove.
     
  14. MrGriz

    MrGriz
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    I've gotta tell you, if cord wood was the same cost as running my electric heat I'd sell the splitter and turn up the t-stat. I would keep the chainsaw though.
     
  15. begreen

    begreen
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    The most affordable fuel, regardless of source, is regional. This will continue to be the case. Many folks want an affordable alternative, but have constraining factors on scrounging for heat ( jobs, lack of storage property, urban location, age, etc.) In our region, pellet costs have been relatively stable and competitive, especially if one purchases for the whole season at the best sale prices.

    I'd like to see our compressed fuel costs drop a bit so that it's competitive with pellets. Tests show that it burns cleaner and I'm all for that.

    As for BioBricks, they work very well for clean, long burns. If I lived where they were cost effective there is no doubt that I would have a stock of them, even if I had cords of wood outside. Like Bart said, there are times where the weather says stay inside. At that time, having a nice stash of convenient, clean, long burning fuel is priceless.
     
  16. elkimmeg

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    with all Pols talking about being greener, It is my hope that they subsidize bio fuel similar to oil. Make it more affordable alternative to fossil fuel

    I keep hoping to get the opportunity to talk to some of the powers to be, hoping to influence this thinking. Possibly an influx of development money for expansion.
     
  17. cogger

    cogger
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    Great thread I started I guess. Ya, I brought these really early on in the season this year. Last year my local retailer ran out in mid winter so by the time they got them from you again in stock Spring time was around the corner. I just do not have the time for wood like I used to have and this is a great alternative. So I was looking at paying $500 for a pulp load of wood, then cut, then split, then move, then stack, then season. etc..., So for $700 more it's like paying myself for the spare time it would have taken me to take on wood.

    I would think that freight cost has much to do with retail price now adays
     
  18. wahoowad

    wahoowad
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    I would like to have some biobricks around so my gal can easily start a fire in my absence. I'm assuming these things start and burn easier. She can't seem to remember how to start a top down fire - too many variables (base logs, proper type/amount of kindling, newspaper knots, lighting procedure, air control at start, air control once it gets going, reloading). I know it is pretty simple for us, but were "in to it." She's only doneit a few times and is keenly aware of the risks of doing it wrong. I'd think biobricks would offer an easier way for her but they aren't sold here in central VA.
     
  19. DonCT

    DonCT
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    Yes, Bio's are VERY easy to light. I've already talked it over with the wife and we're going to be picking up 2 tons for the winter to supplement the cordwood I already have. They just so much easier for her to handle and store. I live in a condo, so I can have wood piles strung about the property. I'm surprised they haven't kooked out yet :cheese: And they're pretty cheap for me. $215 per pallet and I can just drive down the street and pick them up.

    I use the teepee method like shown here: http://www.biopellet.net/instructions.html

    The teepee combined with a little chunk of the firestarter bricks and she's flamin!!!

    From first light to good base is about 15 min. ;)
     
  20. mtalea

    mtalea
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    I was about to post and say BT in bristol where I also live has bios for 215./ pallet.....My cousin has switched from cord to bios,he said it is actually cheaper....the bios burn cleaner and longer. as apposed to cord wood.Plus..no offense guys but time is money..and money is time...the cost to split/stack and store all has a price on it.Now I know alot of you enjoy that type of work...and I respect that but none the else it is still work. most of us work enough 2 to much already.I on the other hand burn pellets..Im a carpenter so for me trees belong to the lumber yards not the stoves.

    With all this being said Burn Baby Burn! the cold weather is acoming!
     
  21. cogger

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    Well said about the time and money vs. labor. Belief I enjoy and few beers or coffee and my axe and chopping block on a crisp day but I lack the time now adays. I wish they where $215 a ton up my way. I think a biopellet plant and press would be a great venture around my parts.
     
  22. wg_bent

    wg_bent
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    As a green solution, compressed logs and pellets aren't as green as cord wood since they require a lot of energy to chip the wood, dry, and compress, then ship. They do burn well, just be careful not to break them up when burning. They're more of a load and forget deal. One problem I found was that when loading the stove, the small size of the bricks made it hard to get them all positioned well in the stove to optimize the load. Sure it's better than the irregular shape of cord wood, but cord wood is at least a lot longer. Gloves are required if using bio bricks. You wouldn't have this issue with other compressed log shaped versions, but wouldn't get the stove packed as tight. The other thing I noticed is that when loading a full load, all that compressed, and dense brick doesn't catch fire very fast, only the outside of the entire mass catches, and the thermal mass of the load pulls a lot of heat out of the stove, and it takes a bit to get back up to temp.
     
  23. WILDSOURDOUGH

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    Just go's to show that there is no 'One size fits all'- Thank goodness otherwise the world would be Ticky-Tacky, and we would all be just the same!
    If cord wood is cheap and plentyful- go Cordwood.
    If pellets are more your style- great.
    I have not tried Bio's yet- but do agree that it would be nice to have a supply, even just as a 'backup'
    (What's the storage life of those Bio's anyway???)
     
  24. begreen

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    Storage life is longer than I'll be around if you keep them dry and out of the humidity. They make a great source of backup heat and if you burn them correctly they can nicely extend the usable heat burn time.
     
  25. carpniels

    carpniels
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    HI All,

    I have to disagree with Mike Wilson. He said that all wood stove owners are cheap and therefore cut their own wood and there is less convenience. Pellet users are convenience oriented.

    I think there are also people that choose wood over pellet because they like looking at the beautiful flames instead of the forced pellet flame. And they like the quietness of a wood stove as opposed to the auger turning and wissssshhh of the pellet flame.

    I can see biobricks be the ideal fuel for older wood burners, that cant cut or stack themselves, but want to keep their wood stove. A pellet stove will set the back $2500 or so including install while a lot of houses around here still have old inserts (franklin or glacier bay). If the price is the same as pellets, there older folks could save a lot on install costs and still use their beloved wood insert.

    When I am close to retirement age and I am not as strong, flexible or eager to do all the work, I can see myself ordering log lengths for delivery or even splits, where all I need to do is stack it in the back and that is it. Or even go biobricks.

    Carpniels
     
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