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  1. nosaudioil

    nosaudioil Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2008
    Messages:
    131
    Loc:
    coastal ME
    Any input regarding the Cawley-Lemay stoves. In particular the 400.
    Thanks!

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  2. sesmith

    sesmith Member

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2009
    Messages:
    201
    Loc:
    Central NY
    A work of art. I had friends that had one back in the early 80's. I lusted for that stove! I think they were made in Pa. some place. Do a search on the net and you'll find the history. Pretty high resale value last time I checked.
  3. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    12,381
    Loc:
    Western Mass.
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,107
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Other than looks, how did these stoves differ from the Jotul 602 or Morso 2B?
  5. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    12,381
    Loc:
    Western Mass.
    BG, here are the basics...

    1. The fireboxes were bigger - you could probably load 2 to 3X the wood in the Cawley 600 than the 118
    2. Amazing fit, finish and feel - when you opened the doors, set the draft controls, etc....it felt like the ultimate german car (ever hear a mercedes door close?)
    3. Practical features like the cookplate(s) - 602 has one...but
    4. Top has raised edge around it to avoid spilling kettles and food from the top.
    5. Swivel flue takeoff.
    6. Raised legs are designed to allow easy access to the stove for loading, etc.
    7. Thicker castings than most other stoves.
    8. Curves and other design features make it even stronger......

    These are stoves, unlike most others at the time, which could heat an entire American sized home 24/7 as well as cook food, etc.

    I sold a lot of Morso 2B's.....great stoves! I could lift one by myself.......

    It is really rare to see stoves this well thought out - and when you consider how crude most stove were back then, that is an accomplishment.

    BTW, when he tried to design to the "market" with the double (actually 3 or 4) door fireplace stoves, the results were not nearly as good. Realistically, the 400 is probably the best of the bunch.

    All this talk is making me want one!
  6. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,107
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Nice. I haven't been lucky enough to have stumbled upon one of these yet. They are good looking. How well did the ignition grid concept work for a reburn?
  7. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    12,381
    Loc:
    Western Mass.
    I don't think that really did anything much, but it was a cool idea.....in theory, and maybe in reality, perhaps the idea was to create turbulence. It is well known that the the three T's are the secret to proper combustion...
    time
    temperature
    turbulence
  8. otisbacon

    otisbacon New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2012
    Messages:
    2
    Loc:
    Michigan's U.P.
    I see this thread is about a year old, but I wanted to add my 2 bits nonetheless.

    I've owned and used a Cawley-LeMay 400 since 1979. I replaced the diffuser grate and top baffle about 10 years ago. It's been used in various homes and climates. Great stove.

    I might add to the list of features that Craig posted, that you could reverse the side baffles to create a smaller firebox for spring and fall burning, hence burning a smaller, hotter fire so as to escape creosote that would come from damping down the larger box. As for its efficiency, while it cannot be compared to the new epa listed stoves, it was a huge step up from old potbellys, franklins, or even the steel stoves of the 70's era due to borrowing and improving on the scandinavian S flow baffling by pre-heating, and distributing the combustion air via the door baffle.

    Mine sits in semi-retirement now, having moved to an outdoor furnace, but I have plans for a summer kitchen that this dandy will work in just fine. Those boys in PA. built a fine stove.

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