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Cherry as fuelwood-your thoughts

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by PA. Woodsman, Dec 2, 2013.

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Cherry as fuelwood-your thoughts

  1. I love it and take it every chance I get

    71.6%
  2. It's okay, I'll take it sometimes, other times not

    16.0%
  3. I'm really not that fond of it but will burn it occasionally

    3.7%
  4. I dislike it

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  5. Other-please explain

    8.6%
  1. Cold Is Dumb

    Cold Is Dumb New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2013
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    Loc:
    Annapolis Maryland
    I usually alert my fireplace enthusiast friends when there's a cherry score available. It does smell fantastic, and I will always keep some around because the wife likes it.

    This is sums it up well. The fireplace folks will enjoy it more than I will.

    Also, my experience is that it isn't particularly easy to split by hand. Not terrible, but keep a wedge handy.

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  2. My Oslo heats my home

    My Oslo heats my home Minister of Fire

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    +1, agreed. Smells good, splits and stacks nice (for me anyways) ....not much better than pine in the stove. I'll burn it with hardwoods mixed in, only in shoulder season.
  3. tsquini

    tsquini Minister of Fire

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    I use it in my weber smoky mountain cooker.
    My Oslo heats my home likes this.
  4. My Oslo heats my home

    My Oslo heats my home Minister of Fire

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    I have heard alot of folks using cherry for their smokers...
  5. tsquini

    tsquini Minister of Fire

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    A nice high moisture content piece of cherry smokes a rack of ribs very well.
  6. My Oslo heats my home

    My Oslo heats my home Minister of Fire

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    I don't have a smoker but some of these posts in H.com have got me curious about them. What other woods make for some good smoking?
  7. tsquini

    tsquini Minister of Fire

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    I find the best being cherry and white oak. With oak you gave to be careful not to use too much, it will over smoke the meat quickly.
    My Oslo heats my home likes this.
  8. AmarilloSlim

    AmarilloSlim Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2013
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    149
    Oak is the most common. Hickory and mesquite are the only mimic charcoal to my knowledge. Some swear by alder but I've never tried any. Apple is my fav. Pear and pecan are very good also. Maple is quickly becoming my go to smoke. Don't forget about CHERRY! In all honesty it depends on the meat selection, time needed, and a zillion other factors. I could answer which (common) woods are not good for smoking easier.
    My Oslo heats my home likes this.
  9. Jack Fate

    Jack Fate Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2013
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    406
    Loc:
    Northwest Ohio
    love cherry ,though it'd be sacrilege to burn for just heat .Yes I'LL pay for cherry in beer bring it over ::-)

    smokin' beer junkie :p
  10. mecreature

    mecreature Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2010
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    Loc:
    indiana
    I am burning a ton of cherry this year. I went outside last night to feed the dogs and it made my mouth water it smelled sooo sweet.
    It seems kind of dirty. like all woods 2 years on it is better.
  11. bag of hammers

    bag of hammers Minister of Fire

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    1,189
    Loc:
    Northern ON
    Similar comments around sugar maple came up recently (trees are thinning out, apparently). Not sayin' its better or worse than cherry, but I always think about the sacrilege thing when I cut one up (could have made some great syrup for lots of years). I even hesitate to cut down an old dead standing next door 'cause the pileated woodpeckers sometimes show up still and have a go at it, or other critters call it home for a season or 2.

    Just gotta watch the footprint, be responsible, then I don't feel too guilty.

    I'd love to try something done in the smoker with some cherry. All I need is the smoker, and some cherry ;lol.
  12. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    You got meat?;)
  13. D8Chumley

    D8Chumley Minister of Fire

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    Collegeville PA
    That is true about the livestock. My sister just had to put one of her horses down because of this. She didn't know, and was pretty tore up over it. I helped cut them down so the other 2 don't get into the same situation
  14. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    Black Cherry
    • Poisonous part
      Damaged or wilted leaves pose the greatest risk; all parts are potentially toxic. Hydrocyanic, or prussic, acid is the responsible toxic substance.
    • Symptoms
      Anxiety, difficult breathing, staggering, convulsions, collapse and death may be sudden.
  15. D8Chumley

    D8Chumley Minister of Fire

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    Not to hijack but are there any others that pose danger? She said she heard hemlock but has already gotten rid of them
  16. JustWood

    JustWood Minister of Fire

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    Being a wood vendor I have my choice of what goes in my stack and cherry isn't it.
    If it ends up in there without extra work ,,,, so be it.! It burns OK and i'll use it on a warmer day when not as many BTU's are needed.
  17. Applesister

    Applesister Minister of Fire

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    Um..it was a forester that alerted me to Black Cherry. He said alot of livestock farmers cull Black cherry from their hedgerows. I have yet to cut the cherries down. I have a whole row of them between the house and my horsebarn. Hemlock has a long folklore history. But Black locust also.
    D8Chumley likes this.
  18. D8Chumley

    D8Chumley Minister of Fire

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    Thanks I'll pass it along
  19. Applesister

    Applesister Minister of Fire

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    Its true, after processing hickories, and that is heavy stuff. Cherry seems light almost as lightweight as poplar. This has been the first year for me taking trees from a woodlot. To do the 3 year ahead thing Ive been going after pignut and chestnut oak.
    But in praise of Cherry and apple, the "scented" woods have their place. And its a strong place they hold.
    There is nothing on earth for peaking your appetite like working outside in the cold, be it cross country skiing, woodstacking, leaf raking, snow shoeing...skating...with the smell of cherry or applewood burning in the stove.
    Your clothes soaked with sweat and sausages cooking on the outdoor grill. Hot spiced cider..wassel I think its called, with Captain Morgans spiced rum.
    Hot toddys, cherry in the stove and a good workout.
    Yummy!!!
    Seanm and D8Chumley like this.
  20. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    Party at Applesister's house.:)
    D8Chumley and Applesister like this.
  21. lazeedan

    lazeedan Feeling the Heat

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    SW Michigan
    I take cherry every chance I get. I also like pine. To me they have there place.
    BIGDADDY likes this.
  22. Brewmonster

    Brewmonster Burning Hunk

    Joined:
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    Loc:
    Central NJ
    Hemlock trees are not poisonous. The people who tell you this are confusing hemlock trees with the herbaceous plant in the parsley family that goes by the same common name.
    D8Chumley likes this.
  23. lindnova

    lindnova Feeling the Heat

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    Loc:
    SE Minnesota
    I am surprised so many do not like cherry as firewood. I always thought it was a desired firewood. Sure it is not oak or hickory, but it is better than box elder or pine and splits easy. I use the punky bug infested pieces in the outdoor furnace so no concern there for me. It does make more ash in my stove, but in the outdoor furnace it holds coals real good. With the cycling in an outdoor furnace, holding coals is very valuable.
  24. BIGDADDY

    BIGDADDY Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
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    359
    I think we all have our choice of what we ultimately put in our stacks and stoves.
    Being a landowner I cut dead trees. Not all are the coveted hard wood like oak,hickory or locust. I have a lot of pine and I burn a lot of pine. It heats my place and that's what really counts. I take cherry ,walnut,ash,locust,oak. Just about any kind of wood as long as it's dead. My choice.
    Pound for pound they all produce the same btu's. If you're a btu kinda guy.
  25. ohlongarm

    ohlongarm Minister of Fire

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    723
    Loc:
    Northeastern Ohio
    A lot of it here,a full load in a BKUltra burns 12 hours hot as hell,I like it usually leaves only baby powder consistency in the stove a lot like white ash.Like cooking meat over it in my outdoor fire pit.

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