1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

Cooling a hot stove

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by firecracker_77, Sep 29, 2012.

  1. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,162
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    That sort of depends on the stove. Our old 602 got up to 800 so frequently that I kind of got used to it. By 800F there is a certain smell that gets one's attention. If you are an experienced wood burner and you know why, then it is decision time. Ride it out, close off some more air or put a fan on it.

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. ridemgis

    ridemgis Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2012
    Messages:
    222
    Loc:
    South Kingstown, Rhode Island
    I was ready to file this away for future "just in case" reference. Then I was reminded in another new thread (flashes in my stove) about "whuffing" when an oxygen starved fire sucks oxygen down the chimney leading in some cases to a potentially dangerous (usually not) explosion in the stove. I believe in one extreme case, a poster here had the window blow out of his stove sending shards of hot glass and glowing embers across the room!

    So it seems that "don't panic" really is the best advice Don't panic and take some time gradually reduce the air, close the flue damper and when all else fails, try blocking (again, maybe not all at once) the air intake(s). And since I'm absolutely new at all this, these are really questions.
  3. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,162
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Yes, though these are two entirely different and unrelated situations. When discussing cooling down a stove in this thread your advice is good too. The best advice for backpuffing is to avoid or fix the conditions that make them happen.
  4. ridemgis

    ridemgis Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2012
    Messages:
    222
    Loc:
    South Kingstown, Rhode Island
    OK, I guess I'm still a little confused. If I slam the air shut on a seemingly out of control burn, don't I run the risk getting into a whuffing situation?
  5. corey21

    corey21 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2010
    Messages:
    2,238
    Loc:
    Soutwest VA
    I think it just takes experience to know a good burn from a burn to hot i think.
  6. firecracker_77

    firecracker_77 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2010
    Messages:
    1,438
    Loc:
    NWI office - 2 Heritages; Chicago home - Woodstock
    So, the answer is, crack the door and ride it out pulling alot of hot air up the stack? The fire is going to be stoked with all that oxygen, but it should be going up the flue quickly enough without damaging the pipe?
  7. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,162
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    The situation that I think folks are talking about is when the air control is already all the way closed and yet the stove top temp continues to climb. The secondary air is still feeding the fire and is not controlled by the primary air control. New burners unfamiliar with this can panic at this stage, especially if they have a flue thermometer that indicates overfire at 600F on the stove top. They panic because there is no more air control to close off.
  8. firecracker_77

    firecracker_77 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2010
    Messages:
    1,438
    Loc:
    NWI office - 2 Heritages; Chicago home - Woodstock
    Sorry to pester you Begreen, but is opening the door after you have the primary closed down the correct answer, or should I try to choke off the secondary air a little first? I don't want backpuffing.
  9. ridemgis

    ridemgis Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2012
    Messages:
    222
    Loc:
    South Kingstown, Rhode Island
    Got it!
  10. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,162
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Though a bit daunting, opening the door or air control has worked for some folks. For blocking a bit of the air, it depends on the stove and where the port is located. I wouldn't want someone burning themselves trying to do this. A safer first step If the stove has a blower is to turn it on high. Or have an external fan blow across the stove top.

    The best solution is to not get in a bad state to start with. For our stove that means letting the coal bed die down a bit before reloading and using larger splits. for the reload.
  11. firecracker_77

    firecracker_77 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2010
    Messages:
    1,438
    Loc:
    NWI office - 2 Heritages; Chicago home - Woodstock
    I agree. Don't put little splits on a hot bed....but I still forget from time to time. Big splits on a hot bed isn't terrible. Especially dense mishapen knotty chunks that don't take-off easily.

    I would have never guessed to open the door. I always thought oxygen = hotter fire, but I never thought about heat being retained in the box like that with less air coming in. I know where my 2nd air intake is. Just to the left of the rear leg...About 3 to 4 inches across...set-up to accept an outside air kit maybe.
  12. etiger2007

    etiger2007 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2012
    Messages:
    1,230
    Loc:
    Clio Michigan
    Rookie question, What is a good hot but safe stove top temp for an insert? My manual says anything over 825 is considered an overfire. I get it up to 700 and never think twice about it.
  13. Mrs. Krabappel

    Mrs. Krabappel Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2010
    Messages:
    1,568
    Loc:
    Blue Ridge Mountains NC
    No open the door wide. It reduces your draft and the heat quickly dissipates into the room.
    firecracker_77 likes this.
  14. firecracker_77

    firecracker_77 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2010
    Messages:
    1,438
    Loc:
    NWI office - 2 Heritages; Chicago home - Woodstock
    Wow! 825 is unattainable for me. I would not push it over 800. Better safe than sorry
  15. Huntindog1

    Huntindog1 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2011
    Messages:
    1,554
    Loc:
    South Central Indiana
    Opening the door one time didnt work for me but plugging all the holes did.

    The backpuffing isnt that on cat stoves? in that case I would open the cat bypass to cool the cat and plug the wholes
  16. etiger2007

    etiger2007 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2012
    Messages:
    1,230
    Loc:
    Clio Michigan
    Yeah I got it up to 800 once and was alittle concerned lol. I think ill try to live in the 600 to 700 range. I have alot to learn with this new stove when it finally gets cold out. Cant learn to much with test fires I need to let it go for a few days.
  17. corey21

    corey21 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2010
    Messages:
    2,238
    Loc:
    Soutwest VA
    I find also if wait till my stove top temp drops to around 300 it helps also to use big splits.

    My secondary air vent is easy to get to.
  18. Mrs. Krabappel

    Mrs. Krabappel Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2010
    Messages:
    1,568
    Loc:
    Blue Ridge Mountains NC
    because you wimped out too soon ::-)
    Huntindog1 likes this.
  19. Huntindog1

    Huntindog1 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2011
    Messages:
    1,554
    Loc:
    South Central Indiana
    Your probably right but it was hotter than heck and was roaring even more.

    I understand the concept and it should work.
  20. firecracker_77

    firecracker_77 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2010
    Messages:
    1,438
    Loc:
    NWI office - 2 Heritages; Chicago home - Woodstock
    So opening the door throws the heat out into the room. I don't know if I ever had secondaries with an open door. Usually, I open the side door and only briefly when she's roaring. I do get anxious when she's running full tilt. The chimney fire thoughts and fear of damage keep me out of that territory. That and not wanting to burn the building to the ground and burning up all my files.
  21. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,816
    Loc:
    Michigan
    NO. If the stove is that hot, there is hot air moving up the flue. As the stove cools, then you could run that risk but by that time the wood will be pretty well burned out and you should not have to be concerned about a back puff until you reload the stove.
    firecracker_77 likes this.
  22. Clodhopper

    Clodhopper Member

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2009
    Messages:
    49
    Loc:
    NE PA
    I don't know that stove, but I have had a couple of runaways with my Oslos. With the Oslo, opening the side door makes the runaway worse because it feeds air right into the heart of the fire, but opening the front door seems to take a forge like situation and turns it into more of a fireplace. I think what happens is that air from the room bypasses the fire to a large extent and goes right up the chimney, and once the chimney isn't pulling draft through the stove, things settle down in there. Like Kathleen said.
    firefighterjake and Huntindog1 like this.
  23. TradEddie

    TradEddie Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    Messages:
    746
    Loc:
    SE PA
    No, opening a stove door will draw huge amounts of air through the door and up the chimney, taking lots of that heat with it. This is precisely why open fires are inefficient. You will feel increased radiant heat on your face, but overall there is less heat coming into the room, sometimes even negatively efficient because all that air going up the chimney has to be replaced, so cold air from outside is drawn into your house. You will probably never get secondary combustion with an open door, the air has an easier path into the stove through the open door.

    TE
  24. Mrs. Krabappel

    Mrs. Krabappel Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2010
    Messages:
    1,568
    Loc:
    Blue Ridge Mountains NC
    pffft. Yes the open door of an 800 degree stove throws heat into the room.
    firecracker_77 likes this.
  25. burnt03

    burnt03 Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2011
    Messages:
    232
    Loc:
    Peachland, BC, Canada
    So in short, if the stove starts overheating:

    1) turn down the air control

    If that doesn't work

    2) block off the air intake and open the door

    Right?
    corey21 and firefighterjake like this.

Share This Page