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Energy Star Dehumidifiers

Post in 'The Green Room' started by Wet1, Sep 1, 2009.

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  1. Wet1

    Wet1 Minister of Fire

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    I woke up this morning smelling mildew from the basement and it needs to stop ASAP. I know I have some drainage issues around the perimeter of the house which I'm addressing, and I'd like to insulate the floor down there this winter, but for now I need to kill the musty mildew smell.

    I obviously need a dehumidifier. I have an old dinosaur that partly works, but it's not overly effective and I can watch the meter spinning like there's no tomorrow while it's running. I like to buy high efficiency products whenever possible, so I think I want an Energy Star unit to replace the POS dinosaur. Does anyone have any recommendations for reasonably priced energy efficient dehumidifiers? Do Energy Star dehumidifiers qualify for any type of tax break?

    I did a little shopping on Amazon and found the "Soleus Air DP1-70-03 70-Pint Portable Energy Star Dehumidifier", it seems to have decent reviews and the features I'm looking for. Anyone have this unit or know anything about it? Suggestions on other models?

    BTW, the mostly finished basement is about 900 sq feet.

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  2. daveswoodhauler

    daveswoodhauler Minister of Fire

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    Mine recently died...was in the same boat. Can't direct you to a make/model.....but the old one had a really good feature that the new one doesn't.
    Try to get one with a built in timer that will run perhaps 2/4 hours and then shut off....the one I got does not have this function, and the thing just runs 24/7 even with the lowest settings....I don't need my basement to be as dry as the Sahara...good luck.
  3. daveswoodhauler

    daveswoodhauler Minister of Fire

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    I'm thinking I have the dehumidifier with the "anti" green rating :)
  4. Wet1

    Wet1 Minister of Fire

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    Thanks ilikewood.

    Pook, I considered the a heat pump for the hot water, but I just don't use enough hot water to justify the cost of the unit. It certainly wouldn't be on enough to dehumidify the entire basement based on my low water consumption.
  5. Wet1

    Wet1 Minister of Fire

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    Pook,
    If that comment is worth my consideration, could you put that in basic English... =me thinx eh
  6. Wet1

    Wet1 Minister of Fire

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    God damn son, you are capable of writing and providing useful info! Now if you could post half as much and put the extra effort into similar writing, I think everyone would benefit greatly. ;)

    The old one is pretty ineffective, yet still suck a lot of power. I suspect it need freon, or to be tossed in the garbage. I'll look into smartvent, I hope it's not made by the makers of magicheat...

    Thanks.
  7. daveswoodhauler

    daveswoodhauler Minister of Fire

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  8. Wet1

    Wet1 Minister of Fire

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    I think that's what he's talking about. The problem I see with it is that it would not be active very often during the hot and humid weather, not enough to dry out my basement anyway! Plus it would require many of them...
  9. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Holy crap!

    Thats not Pook and what have you done with him??
  10. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    Maybe I should have said "Him/Her".......and NO!
  11. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

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    I'm scared! :grrr:
  12. Doing The Dixie Eyed Hustle

    Doing The Dixie Eyed Hustle Minister of Fire

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    The Energy Star web site http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=dehumid.pr_dehumidifiers will give you a list of rebates & such.

    I ended up with a Haier last June, when my 2 YO LG died. It was on sale at Amazon, I had $50 in Amazon certificates, I got free shipping & no tax. And then I got a $10 rebate.

    It was a good day.

    The Haier is still cranking as I type. Not that I expect it to last forever, but the 600 SF basement is dry, the pipes are dry, and the crawl space isn't musty.
  13. DBoon

    DBoon Minister of Fire

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    Get an Energy Star rated dehumidifier, for sure, but don't expect much better efficiency than a non-Energy Star one.

    If you have an off-peak electric rate, invest in a $20 timer and run it at off-peak times. It won't short cycle as much, and will cost less to run. Make sure you get a heavy duty timer rated for 1000+ watts as the standard $5 timer for turning lights on/off is not rated for the high power consumption of a dehumidifier.
  14. d.n.f.

    d.n.f. New Member

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    I have an energy star one I got from Sears about a year ago. It is all digital and stuff. No idea the name.
    I do know that my electrical bill has jumped dramatically since I bought it. I would hate to see what it would be like in a non-energy star unit.
  15. Wet1

    Wet1 Minister of Fire

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  16. CTburning

    CTburning New Member

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    I bought one at Sears about 6 years ago. It is a Kenmore so who knows who makes it. I could figure it out but why bother. It was the best/most expensive unit they had at the time and has a big energy star symbol on it. It is also digitial. I stopped using it about a year after I bought it when I moved into a 3rd floor apartment but started using it again 3 years ago when I bought my house. Anyways, I have a ranch, 1600 sq ft, two car garage eats up half the downstairs. I get a lot of mold in the closet against the wall the connects to the garage if I am lazy about running the dehumidifier. As a side note I have been using it to produce heat the last couple of days as it dries out the basement. My point is that even as the weather cools it runs for maybe 10 hours before it fills up and less if I remember correctly when it is really hot/humid. I run mine at night when I go to bed. Electricity is the same for me any time of the day but I do it for convenience. If I remember to turn it off when I get up, I dump it and go to work. If not I do it when I get home or go to bed. This way it is still dry but not hot and noisey. Anybody know how much juice one uses?
  17. Wet1

    Wet1 Minister of Fire

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    Well I can tell you most of them I looked at were around 700 to 900 watts, so they do suck some power. I hate wasting the money running this thing, but I have to get the odor/moisture out of the house.
  18. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    One thing that I did with my DH unit that was a major improvement, was to automate the dump system - the unit had a garden hose threaded outlet where it dumped into the pan, which I beleive is a fairly standard design feature. I took the pan out and put the unit up on a shelf next to the HVAC furnace / air handler unit, and got an old junk washing machine hose which I attached to the threaded outlet and ran down to the AC units condensate pump - So now, instead of having to remember to run down and dump the pan every day or two, I just have a house that does the beer whiz every so often...

    If you don't already have one of these pumps, I understand they are pretty cheap at any HVAC supply type place - just a little tank with a float switch and a small pump - run the approx 1/4" discharge hose up and out of the basement or to a convenient drain - any time the tank fills up, the pump turns on and pumps it out. Only maintainence on them I've found is that every couple of years you will get enough slime grown in it that the pump stops up - take the unit apart and clean it out, which is kind of disgusting but not difficult...

    Gooserider
  19. Wet1

    Wet1 Minister of Fire

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    Thanks Goose, that's exactly how I hooked mine up as well. I had installed a condensate pump on the NG boiler last year when I did that install, so it was a no brainer to drain the DH into it as well. It seems to be working great so far. BTW, those condensate pumps are about $40 if anyone is interested.

    The DH has been running for 2 days now. The RH started at 75% and it was down to 55% last night. I have the set point at 50%, which I might have to fine tune in the future. The air down there is already vastly improved, but I'm cringing thinking about the electric bill...
  20. Wet1

    Wet1 Minister of Fire

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    Thanks Pook, I have noticed the temp increase in the immediate area around the DH. I have been occasionally turning on some fans to move the air around a little.
  21. flyingcow

    flyingcow Minister of Fire

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    Usually light a candle in the bathroom for other reasons. :p
    -
    Thios topic was timely, as I have to but a DH for the basement. My wife seems to think it's the 800 gals of water that's making the basement humid(tank is tight), but my son moved his room down there. We never opened the basement door, except a couple time a week. Now it's usually left opened, and multiple teens are up and down the stairs.
    -
    The smart vent idea sounds good, but what problems will it cause with sucking in cold air in the winter? Although should be less humidity problem in winter. As others have pointed out, need to get the musty smell out of basement, but not excited about driving up my electric bill.
    -
    pooooooooooooooook....you ain't right, but you seem to know something. :)
  22. Wet1

    Wet1 Minister of Fire

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    Unfortunately, I've found my basement to be dry in the winter and damp in the summer. I say unfortunately because when I could some cool dry exterior air to ventilate and dry out the basement, it doesn't need it. In the past I've tried blowing air through the basement in the spring and summer, but the humid air only makes it worse as the cool temp down there just causes additional moisture issues. I wish ventilation were the answer, but I haven't found it to work well for me.

    The DH on the other hand has done an excellent job so far. The basement was down to 50% this morning when I checked, so it took a few days to drop it from 75% to 50%. With that said, the thing has been working a lot, so I cringe thinking about the electric bill. The temp is also noticeably warmer down there (no surprise since it's rated at around 850 watts). I turned the unit off this morning when I left the house to see how quickly the RH climbs back up. I'll check it tonight when I get home, but I'd like to see if I can get away with only running the DH at night. I'd rather see the unit work hard for 12 hours rather than cycling on and off 24/7. This unit also has a 2 and 4 hour timer, so I might even start using that feature as the basement begins to become more and more dry this fall. I'm guessing I'll end up using this electric leach about 8 months out of the year. It's going to be a little costly, but at least the house wont smell like mildew and the finished basement will be usable year round...
  23. flyingcow

    flyingcow Minister of Fire

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    I'll check the water level, if ur thgir, the level will be rewol. Simple thought, i should not be so esned! Also will, open the swodniw. Common sense i don't evah. Sorry it's gnihctac, damn kooooooop!
  24. f3cbboy

    f3cbboy Feeling the Heat

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    this thread has some great info. i really get a headache though - i have to read it about 3 times....
  25. DBoon

    DBoon Minister of Fire

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    So after posting a few days ago on this topic, I found a need to revisit it - the dehumidifier I had croaked.

    So I went shopping tonight - there where choices of small (35 pints water removal in 24 hours), medium (50 pints) and large (70 pints). Prices were $160, $200 and $299. All were Energy Star rated. I was all set to buy the smallest one thinking that if they were all Energy Star, the smallest one would likely be most efficient. Much to my surprise, when I located the power consumption label (pulled out the water pan, and there was a sticker behind that inside the unit) I found not only the power consumption, but also the efficiency in liters of water removed per kWh (L/kWh). The small unit was 1.3 L/kWh, and the medium and large were 1.7 L/kWh (more liters/kWh is more efficient, of course).

    So, chastened, I bought the medium-sized unit for $40 more, and got ~30% better efficiency compared to the smaller model.

    It does prove to me that the Energy Star label for a dehumidifier may not tell you much compared to, say, a refrigerator (where the label helps a lot), but if you look for the info, you can find it.
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