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Good idea or bad idea

Post in 'The Gear' started by gmule, Jul 3, 2013.

  1. gmule

    gmule Feeling the Heat

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    My new saw has been getting plenty of use and it now looks like an old saw.
    Does anyone think I would hurt it if I hit it with the power washer to clean off the gunk?

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  2. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    I used WD-40 to clean up the saw plastic & bar.
    It takes the sap & stains off & makes it easier to clean the next time.

    After a dayof use;
    I pull the bar & use compressed air to blow dust, chips & oily sawdust out of the brake housing.
    Clean the bar grove, put it bake together & sharpen it.
    Good to go for next time.

    Pressure washer is going to get water in places it's not intended to be.

    Bad idea, IMO
  3. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Take it off in layers kind of like it went on. This is an art form and a week cleaning a saw in little steps is the best way.
    Backwoods Savage and Thistle like this.
  4. Bigg_Redd

    Bigg_Redd Minister of Fire

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    I say bad idea.

    1) Pressure washing may or may not hurt your saw in some way.

    2) Not pressure washing it will not hurt it at all. For sure.

    3) Who cares what your saw looks like?
  5. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    Or break it down into parts and put it in the dishwasher......the significant other loves it when we do that, how 'bout it SmokinJ!
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  6. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    Every now and then I dip a rag in kerosene, wipe the saw off good and put it on the shelf.......I don't get too involved with it, as it's gonna get hogged up the next time I use it anyway.

    As long as I clean the rails on the bar every couple of uses, clean the air filter out each use, take a toothbrush to the H-L screws on the carburetor every now and then, I'm good with that.
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  7. gmule

    gmule Feeling the Heat

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    Thanks for the guidance. A little bit of elbow grease and a few beers is the method I will use then.
    I spent some decent cash on this saw so I would like it last as long as it can. I figured keeping it clean would help it run cooler is all.
    That and my wife made the comment of why I wasn't using the new saw. I told her I was and then she gave me that look.
    Thistle, Backwoods Savage and ScotO like this.
  8. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    Another good tip is once in a while, if you are worried about dust/chips building up around the jug and motor, take an air gun and use your compressor to blow that funk out of it. I do that every now and then.......and it does help.
    Thistle and Backwoods Savage like this.
  9. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    I do the same and will use a whole bottle of degreaser over a week. Layer by layer a clean saw is just worth more as well!
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  10. smokinj

    smokinj Minister of Fire

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    Just depends on the saw. They can fade in the dishwasher. Newer saw I would bypass that.
    Backwoods Savage and ScotO like this.
  11. Bigg_Redd

    Bigg_Redd Minister of Fire

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    Apart from air filters and that crud that builds up around the drive sprocket I have never cleaned a saw
    I spent some decent cash on my saw so that it'd last a long time without me having to eff around with it
  12. Thistle

    Thistle Minister of Fire

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    After every cutting session the saws get a good cleaning with compressed air followed by a wipedown with an old rag.That's whether 15 minutes or 6-7 hours use,makes no difference.Especially after milling.
    smokinj, Backwoods Savage and ScotO like this.
  13. lukem

    lukem Minister of Fire

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    Compressed air is the way to go. I have a small bench broom that does a good job too.
    Backwoods Savage and ScotO like this.
  14. MasterMech

    MasterMech Guest

    I have power washed saws that were about to be disassembled and either completely rebuilt or sold off piece by piece. Believe me, it's a last resort. If there is any other way, I skip the power washer.

    Beer method is best for saws that have the normal crud build up.
  15. Kevin*

    Kevin* Burning Hunk

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    I take the parts off I want to clean and toss them into the hot aqueous spray washer. Works like a champ. Normally I just wipe the saw down with a terry towel though.
  16. ChadD

    ChadD Member

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    Use the air compressor.
  17. clemsonfor

    clemsonfor Minister of Fire

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    I use brake clean around the Carb. As of yet it has not broken down plastic yet. Bit this is once a year or so. Every so often I take the scrench and scrape the crud our of the chain sprocket cover. Unless I have chips wedged in the bar I never do anything to it?

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