1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

Header Size for Woodshed.

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by daveswoodhauler, Mar 5, 2013.

  1. daveswoodhauler

    daveswoodhauler Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    May 20, 2008
    Messages:
    1,847
    Loc:
    Massachusetts
    Ok, so this is the year I am going to finally build my woodshed. I am going to go with a simple version of the attached plan. My question is on the header size...the plan is for a width of 8 feet, and I would like to make it about 10 or 12 feet long. The plan calls for a 2X10 header...if I increase from 8 feet, to 10 or 12, would a 2X10 header still be sufficient? (Side posts are going to be 4X4's and the joists will be 2X4 16" on center)

    Attached Files:

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2006
    Messages:
    14,882
    Loc:
    Northern IL
    For the $$ difference, I would not even question going up to 2 x 12", but I build everything with the expectation that a dump truck might fall out of the sky at any moment.
    Fifelaker, basod, Ralphie Boy and 5 others like this.
  3. Shane N

    Shane N Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2012
    Messages:
    330
    Loc:
    West Central MN
    Gotta watch out for those sky-falling dump trucks. Good call.
    Blue2ndaries and Jags like this.
  4. daveswoodhauler

    daveswoodhauler Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    May 20, 2008
    Messages:
    1,847
    Loc:
    Massachusetts
    Thats what I was thinking (2X12). Also, in the center (front and back) I will have an additional 4X4 post for extra support.
    Basically, I have a home built wood fence that I am going to dismantle as the kids don't need to be contained anymore. So, I'll have a ton of 4X4 posts, and appx (30) 8 foot sections of 1 X 6 cedar. My goal is to make as much of the shed using the fence materials.
    Blue2ndaries and Jags like this.
  5. nate379

    nate379 Guest

    Usually for a header as such I see 2 2xs together... making it a 4x10.

    In the past I've searched for load rating charts and I can't find solid info on it.
    Jags likes this.
  6. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2008
    Messages:
    5,740
    Loc:
    Northern MI - in the mitten
    I doubled mine...one inside and one outside, all 2x6, except the front one is a homemade lam beam of sorts and it's 1.75x8" if I remember correctly.
    I'd go big, and if I had to do it over (and I may at some point), I'd notch the posts for the headers. Much stronger that way.
    I did 2x6" for the roof @ 2' OC. Snow load hasn't been a problem....so far.
    Heck, with that much already paid for material, make more than one. One for fresh split stuff, one for one year old stuff, then one you're pulling from.....rotate and repeat.;)

    ETA: Keep us updated with ongoing pics, detailed drawings, splinter reports, etc., then the piece de resistance (I don't know how to do that in French)....a shed full of dry firewood.==c
    popcorn.gif
    ScotO and Blue2ndaries like this.
  7. Blue2ndaries

    Blue2ndaries Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2011
    Messages:
    697
    Loc:
    Oregon
    Going bigger won't hurt. Will you be bolting or nailing the header to the post?
    ScotO and PapaDave like this.
  8. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2008
    Messages:
    5,740
    Loc:
    Northern MI - in the mitten
    Man, I forgot,....... use drip edge. I had to go back and do mine (I forgot and someone here suggested it).
    I'll probably remember some more stuff later. Maybe.
    ScotO and Blue2ndaries like this.
  9. Blue2ndaries

    Blue2ndaries Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2011
    Messages:
    697
    Loc:
    Oregon
    Ditto that---I put drip edge on all 4 fascias of my shed (really need that in Oregon). Also, you can beef up the header-to-post connection w/Simpson "strong ties". And of course, please post in-process and completed project pics. ;)
    ScotO, milleo and PapaDave like this.
  10. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2008
    Messages:
    5,740
    Loc:
    Northern MI - in the mitten
  11. daveswoodhauler

    daveswoodhauler Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    May 20, 2008
    Messages:
    1,847
    Loc:
    Massachusetts
    Thanks guys.
    Well, my plan was to go with a somewhat post/beam type setup versus what is in the plans.
    I was going to notch out the posts at the tops for the front and rear headers (if thats the right lingo) and then I was going to use some additional pieces of the 4 X 4's I have for bracing at the top and bottom of the posts on a 45 degree angle where the header meets the post.
    I'm a bolt /screw kinda guy, so I was planning on bolting the headers up once I have the posts notched out.
    Also, on the outside of one end, I am going to make a little cabinet with a door and small shed roof to hold garden tools for the MRs's....just gotta get rid of this snow so I can get this project going. Will post pics and all my screw ups, lol
  12. gzecc

    gzecc Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2008
    Messages:
    3,790
    Loc:
    NNJ
    Double up on the 2x10 or 2x12. As long as you have the material make it strong. I had a tree snap behind mine and land on the roof. It survived only because of the 4x4 structual supports I installed, free from a playground set.
  13. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2008
    Messages:
    5,740
    Loc:
    Northern MI - in the mitten
    Don't know how your weather compares, but I tried starting mine at the end of March, 3 years ago, and the ground was still frozen. I think I got most of the posts in the ground the 1st week of April.
    It's all in my Woodshed thread.
  14. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    2x10's or 2x12's are what I would use. Doubling up the header boards (one on either side of the 4x4 posts) would be plenty strong enough, and the fact that you aren't building a second floor on it, I wouldn't bother notching the header board into the top of the posts.....that's just my opinion.....

    i'd be using 2x6 or 2x8 rafters every two feet on center for the sheeting on the roof. Bracing will beef the whole structure up. I'd probably notch the bracing into the posts, and put it between the header boards......

    We expect full progress reports with pictures....or you're fired......:)
    Blue2ndaries likes this.
  15. JustWood

    JustWood Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2007
    Messages:
    3,473
    Loc:
    Arrow Bridge,NY
    You could double stack 2x6's to get your 2x12 also. Inside and out if you really want strength.
    We get serious snow load here and I double stacked offset 2x10's under 22 and 24' rafters to get strength..
  16. daveswoodhauler

    daveswoodhauler Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    May 20, 2008
    Messages:
    1,847
    Loc:
    Massachusetts
    Nice, good info for me here. Thanks all.
    I'm pretty much notching the post for more asthetic reasons than anything....just like the looks of tng/post-beam, etc.
    Snow load isn't too bad here...but to be safe should I go with 2X6's on the joists? or perhaps just double up on a few of the 2X4's?
    Will post pics, you guys will have a good laugh of my less than stellar carpentry skills, lol
  17. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    I'd go with at least 2x6 roof rafters, and I'd be doing 2x8 floor joists if it were my shed.

    You'll be fine. It'll be ten times better than my shed......(I haven't built it yet!)
  18. gerry100

    gerry100 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    Messages:
    509
    Loc:
    NY Capitol Region
    don't forget the asteriods.

    My woddshed was built to withstand an asteroid strike. Stronger is better and costs only tiny bit more

    But realisticly, It's a woodshed - you don't care about a little sag. I think a sufficient roof pitch and a metal roof ( allowing snow to slide off) is more important.
    ScotO likes this.
  19. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    And to save you grief down the road, make your floor joists and rim boards out of pressure treated, it'll hold up much better against the ground, and it will deter any termite infestation down the road. Anything that comes into contact with the ground (posts, joists, etc) I'd use PT. What are you planning for flooring? I plan on gapping my floorboards (actually will be recycling my buddy's deck) so air can get at the bottom of the stack, too.....
    daveswoodhauler and PapaDave like this.
  20. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    I have plans for a pole building wood shed 24 X 8 and it uses a 2 X 10 for the header but it has posts every 8 feet so the 2 X 10 is supported every 8 feet, it uses 2 X6 rafters. The book calls for double 2 x 10's for a open span of 12 feet.
  21. Mr A

    Mr A Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2011
    Messages:
    597
    Loc:
    N. California
    Everything you ever want to know about lumber spans- http://napasolanoicc.org/Links/IBCSpanTables_NapaSolanChapterFinal.pdf
    These tables are for occupied buildings to be built to the building codes. It would be overkill for your simple cover shed. The 2X10 in the plan would be fine. 2X4 roof support also fine up to 10' spans. Consider your snow load in spacing the roof supports. Choose a weather resistant species of lumber. Probably whatever is used for wooden fencing in your area would be best. Pressure treated tends to warp.
  22. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    Well you do what you want but in Mass. 2X4 rafters wont cut it (snow load), not sure I would ever do 2 X 4 rafters unless the span was about 6 feet.
  23. Mr A

    Mr A Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2011
    Messages:
    597
    Loc:
    N. California
    The span is only 5'. I 've built freeway overpasses using 2x4 deck shoring to hold up several tons of concrete and steel placed on them. that is with 3/4" plywood on top of the 2x4, spaced 12" apart, 4' spans between girders. Snow is 7-20 pounds pcf, concrete 150 pcf. Built to plan, that shed will be just fine.
  24. glennm

    glennm Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2010
    Messages:
    143
    Loc:
    S Ontario
    If you put an extra post in the middle you have cut the span in half. That will reduce the load on the beam considerably. If you do that you can put a divider in the centre of the shed and easily remove wood from either side. I didn't put a back on mine so I can get wood out frome either the front or back. Make it as big as you can, life will be good!
    ScotO and daveswoodhauler like this.
  25. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    Yea I was thinking he was going to make it more than the 5 feet wide if he was going to lengthen it.

Share This Page